1 year MBA in the US - employment / career options in the US


Quon190
I am considering doing a 1 year MBA In the US, at a school such as Emory, Notre Dame, or Cornell for example.

I am not a US resident! I am originally from China but I am currently working in Europe on assignment. I would like my next step to be to the US (through a short MBA).

I want to understand better the career prospects after doing 1 year MBA in the US. I would like to work in the US for at least a year before returning to China because experience in the US is valued in my industry.

My main question is which school should I pursue? Which 1 year MBA is the best for career prospects? I would also like to understand if STEM certification can apply to 1 year MBAs so that I can get a longer work visa. Thank you for reading.
I am considering doing a 1 year MBA In the US, at a school such as Emory, Notre Dame, or Cornell for example.

I am not a US resident! I am originally from China but I am currently working in Europe on assignment. I would like my next step to be to the US (through a short MBA).

I want to understand better the career prospects after doing 1 year MBA in the US. I would like to work in the US for at least a year before returning to China because experience in the US is valued in my industry.

My main question is which school should I pursue? Which 1 year MBA is the best for career prospects? I would also like to understand if STEM certification can apply to 1 year MBAs so that I can get a longer work visa. Thank you for reading.
quote
Duncan
Some MBAs have qualified as STEM courses. However, if you have no US work experience a one year MBA is a risky way to look for work. Internships and projects are really vital to the job hunt. Maybe consider places that are easier to migrate to, like Canada or Australia?
Some MBAs have qualified as STEM courses. However, if you have no US work experience a one year MBA is a risky way to look for work. Internships and projects are really vital to the job hunt. Maybe consider places that are easier to migrate to, like Canada or Australia?
quote
mba hipste...
I think Purdue offers (used to offer) a one-year STEM qualified MBA:

https://find-mba.com/board/usa/purdue-launches-one-year-mba-for-stem-professionals-32640

... I can't seem to find evidence of it now though, so maybe they killed it. Otherwise, I am not sure that there are any 1 year programs that are also STEM certified.

Overall, it depends on what your goals are. Losing out on an internship would definitely hurt your prospects.

If you were looking to not change career fields too drastically, and would be ok with just working in the US for the period of the OPT visa (and probably, be willing to take a job that undervalues your experience) before going back to China, it could work.

However, you should also think about your long-term future: will studying in the US really help your opportunities back home?
I think Purdue offers (used to offer) a one-year STEM qualified MBA:

https://find-mba.com/board/usa/purdue-launches-one-year-mba-for-stem-professionals-32640

... I can't seem to find evidence of it now though, so maybe they killed it. Otherwise, I am not sure that there are any 1 year programs that are also STEM certified.

Overall, it depends on what your goals are. Losing out on an internship would definitely hurt your prospects.

If you were looking to not change career fields too drastically, and would be ok with just working in the US for the period of the OPT visa (and probably, be willing to take a job that undervalues your experience) before going back to China, it could work.

However, you should also think about your long-term future: will studying in the US really help your opportunities back home?
quote
Duncan
Isn't that their MSIA?
Isn't that their MSIA?
quote
Quon190
Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized.
Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized.
quote
Duncan
Looks like Alabama and Texas Tech are the options. The rarity of the format speaks to low employer demand.
Looks like Alabama and Texas Tech are the options. The rarity of the format speaks to low employer demand.
quote
Ayon
Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized.


Even though you may not chase the H1B - from the recruiters point of view - you are a risky bet. They realize that there is always a clock ticking with you. STEM OPT doesn't guarantee 3 years of work authorization. The way it works is all students (STEM or otherwise) gets 1 year of work authorization that the student has to request from USCIS indicating a start date. e.g. if you are graduating in May and anticipate getting employment in July. Then you would submit your request to USCIS to start the 1 year clock in July. Let's say if you don't get employment till Sept - well tough luck you have eaten into that 1 year clock and you have 90 days from the start of clock to find employment in line with your education - paid or unpaid.

After "1 year" you need to file again for an extension to USCIS - this is only available to STEM OPT. Please note that the USCIS can still reject your extension application citing reasons that your employment doesn't require master's degree or your employment is not in line with your education. So no - one cannot work in a McDonalds just to meet the criteria after doing MBA - I know because I asked this question to my school immigration officer during a seminar.

All the above - I mention - just to bring home a point that you become a risky investment for an employer. Now unless you bring some skill set that is just not there in US then only will a company be ready to hire you. Most of such jobs are high-tech and/or involve some way shape or form of analytics or awareness with coding.

By default most MBA programs are "generalist" in nature - even the specialist ones aren't deep enough to make you a subject matter expert if you are changing functions.
MBA/MS programs will accept you if you meet their criteria - Chinese/Middle Eastern students bring in lot of money for US tuition - this is common knowledge.

From a recruitment point - it may work in your favor if you find your way to China specific recruiting in US offices of Big 4, or something like the IBM Blue program. Companies like Huawei publishes several jobs for which they prefer bilingual Mandarin / English speaker.
[quote]Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized. [/quote]

Even though you may not chase the H1B - from the recruiters point of view - you are a risky bet. They realize that there is always a clock ticking with you. STEM OPT doesn't guarantee 3 years of work authorization. The way it works is all students (STEM or otherwise) gets 1 year of work authorization that the student has to request from USCIS indicating a start date. e.g. if you are graduating in May and anticipate getting employment in July. Then you would submit your request to USCIS to start the 1 year clock in July. Let's say if you don't get employment till Sept - well tough luck you have eaten into that 1 year clock and you have 90 days from the start of clock to find employment in line with your education - paid or unpaid.

After "1 year" you need to file again for an extension to USCIS - this is only available to STEM OPT. Please note that the USCIS can still reject your extension application citing reasons that your employment doesn't require master's degree or your employment is not in line with your education. So no - one cannot work in a McDonalds just to meet the criteria after doing MBA - I know because I asked this question to my school immigration officer during a seminar.

All the above - I mention - just to bring home a point that you become a risky investment for an employer. Now unless you bring some skill set that is just not there in US then only will a company be ready to hire you. Most of such jobs are high-tech and/or involve some way shape or form of analytics or awareness with coding.

By default most MBA programs are "generalist" in nature - even the specialist ones aren't deep enough to make you a subject matter expert if you are changing functions.
MBA/MS programs will accept you if you meet their criteria - Chinese/Middle Eastern students bring in lot of money for US tuition - this is common knowledge.

From a recruitment point - it may work in your favor if you find your way to China specific recruiting in US offices of Big 4, or something like the IBM Blue program. Companies like Huawei publishes several jobs for which they prefer bilingual Mandarin / English speaker.
quote
mba hipste...
That's a great point. It seems that many US employers are increasingly wary of hiring internationals:

https://find-mba.com/articles/international-mba-students-find-it-tougher-to-get-a-h-1b-visa-in-the-us
That's a great point. It seems that many US employers are increasingly wary of hiring internationals:

https://find-mba.com/articles/international-mba-students-find-it-tougher-to-get-a-h-1b-visa-in-the-us
quote
priya08
Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized.


Even though you may not chase the H1B - from the recruiters point of view - you are a risky bet. They realize that there is always a clock ticking with you. STEM OPT doesn't guarantee 3 years of work authorization. The way it works is all students (STEM or otherwise) gets 1 year of work authorization that the student has to request from USCIS indicating a start date. e.g. if you are graduating in May and anticipate getting employment in July. Then you would submit your request to USCIS to start the 1 year clock in July. Let's say if you don't get employment till Sept - well tough luck you have eaten into that 1 year clock and you have 90 days from the start of clock to find employment in line with your education - paid or unpaid.

After "1 year" you need to file again for an extension to USCIS - this is only available to STEM OPT. Please note that the USCIS can still reject your extension application citing reasons that your employment doesn't require master's degree or your employment is not in line with your education. So no - one cannot work in a McDonalds just to meet the criteria after doing MBA - I know because I asked this question to my school immigration officer during a seminar.

All the above - I mention - just to bring home a point that you become a risky investment for an employer. Now unless you bring some skill set that is just not there in US then only will a company be ready to hire you. Most of such jobs are high-tech and/or involve some way shape or form of analytics or awareness with coding.

By default most MBA programs are "generalist" in nature - even the specialist ones aren't deep enough to make you a subject matter expert if you are changing functions.
MBA/MS programs will accept you if you meet their criteria - Chinese/Middle Eastern students bring in lot of money for US tuition - this is common knowledge.

From a recruitment point - it may work in your favor if you find your way to China specific recruiting in US offices of Big 4, or something like the IBM Blue program. Companies like Huawei publishes several jobs for which they prefer bilingual Mandarin / English speaker.


Hi, these are great insights! I had similar questions as the OP, although, have a few follow up questions:

Since you say US firms look for those with high-valued skills like Analytics, do you think it is a safer bet to get, let's say, an MS in Marketing Analytics from a place like Fordham or Purdue?

Do you think, it's advisable to do a 1 year MS in Marketing (STEM approved) versus doing an MBA in General Management which only gives a 1 year CPT?

Thank you.

[Edited by priya08 on Mar 27, 2019]

[quote][quote]Just to clarify I am not interesting in chasing an H1B visa, I'd be happy with the normal post MBA work visa but I would like to extend it by doing a STEM degree. Is there anything like this that is 1 year long?

I have also thought about Canada or Australia but in my industry work experience in the US is highly prized. [/quote]

Even though you may not chase the H1B - from the recruiters point of view - you are a risky bet. They realize that there is always a clock ticking with you. STEM OPT doesn't guarantee 3 years of work authorization. The way it works is all students (STEM or otherwise) gets 1 year of work authorization that the student has to request from USCIS indicating a start date. e.g. if you are graduating in May and anticipate getting employment in July. Then you would submit your request to USCIS to start the 1 year clock in July. Let's say if you don't get employment till Sept - well tough luck you have eaten into that 1 year clock and you have 90 days from the start of clock to find employment in line with your education - paid or unpaid.

After "1 year" you need to file again for an extension to USCIS - this is only available to STEM OPT. Please note that the USCIS can still reject your extension application citing reasons that your employment doesn't require master's degree or your employment is not in line with your education. So no - one cannot work in a McDonalds just to meet the criteria after doing MBA - I know because I asked this question to my school immigration officer during a seminar.

All the above - I mention - just to bring home a point that you become a risky investment for an employer. Now unless you bring some skill set that is just not there in US then only will a company be ready to hire you. Most of such jobs are high-tech and/or involve some way shape or form of analytics or awareness with coding.

By default most MBA programs are "generalist" in nature - even the specialist ones aren't deep enough to make you a subject matter expert if you are changing functions.
MBA/MS programs will accept you if you meet their criteria - Chinese/Middle Eastern students bring in lot of money for US tuition - this is common knowledge.

From a recruitment point - it may work in your favor if you find your way to China specific recruiting in US offices of Big 4, or something like the IBM Blue program. Companies like Huawei publishes several jobs for which they prefer bilingual Mandarin / English speaker.[/quote]

Hi, these are great insights! I had similar questions as the OP, although, have a few follow up questions:

Since you say US firms look for those with high-valued skills like Analytics, do you think it is a safer bet to get, let's say, an MS in Marketing Analytics from a place like Fordham or Purdue?

Do you think, it's advisable to do a 1 year MS in Marketing (STEM approved) versus doing an MBA in General Management which only gives a 1 year CPT?

Thank you.
quote
Ayon
Depends on what you want to do? What are you career goal? If your goal is to find a job - any job - and you like analytics then MS (STEM or otherwise) makes sense over MBA any day.

If you want to work in Finance Planning & Analysis then maybe MBA in Finance would open more doors than MS in Analytics.

1 year MS in Analytics from places like Fordham, Purdue and CUNY are still better than MBA from similarly ranked schools IF your sole criteria is having the flexibility to work for 3 year on an OPT in US. MS programs are 1 year so your cost of living and wages lost is only for 1 year instead of 2 years needed in MBA. Of course ROI will depend upon fees, scholarships, cost of living, your salary post MBA/MS.
Depends on what you want to do? What are you career goal? If your goal is to find a job - any job - and you like analytics then MS (STEM or otherwise) makes sense over MBA any day.

If you want to work in Finance Planning & Analysis then maybe MBA in Finance would open more doors than MS in Analytics.

1 year MS in Analytics from places like Fordham, Purdue and CUNY are still better than MBA from similarly ranked schools IF your sole criteria is having the flexibility to work for 3 year on an OPT in US. MS programs are 1 year so your cost of living and wages lost is only for 1 year instead of 2 years needed in MBA. Of course ROI will depend upon fees, scholarships, cost of living, your salary post MBA/MS.
quote
Larry
Also, it depends on your career level. A job for somebody with an MBA will be more managerial-oriented and at a different level than a job for somebody who's coming out of a specialized master program.
Also, it depends on your career level. A job for somebody with an MBA will be more managerial-oriented and at a different level than a job for somebody who's coming out of a specialized master program.
quote
priya08
Depends on what you want to do? What are you career goal? If your goal is to find a job - any job - and you like analytics then MS (STEM or otherwise) makes sense over MBA any day.

If you want to work in Finance Planning & Analysis then maybe MBA in Finance would open more doors than MS in Analytics.

1 year MS in Analytics from places like Fordham, Purdue and CUNY are still better than MBA from similarly ranked schools IF your sole criteria is having the flexibility to work for 3 year on an OPT in US. MS programs are 1 year so your cost of living and wages lost is only for 1 year instead of 2 years needed in MBA. Of course ROI will depend upon fees, scholarships, cost of living, your salary post MBA/MS.


Thank you for confirming! I definitely want to be able to gain more than a year-long work experience if I can. My interest area will primarily be Marketing. Although, I wanted someone to give me an honest opinion on any demerits of coming to the US to specialize in Marketing. As far as I know, home-grown talent in Marketing is not lacking. Considering this, does it make sense for an immigrant to come to the US to get a concentration in Marketing (MBA/MS) and expect job opportunities - especially since recruiters are wary of employing immigrants full time or filing an H1B for them?

Thank you!
[quote]Depends on what you want to do? What are you career goal? If your goal is to find a job - any job - and you like analytics then MS (STEM or otherwise) makes sense over MBA any day.

If you want to work in Finance Planning & Analysis then maybe MBA in Finance would open more doors than MS in Analytics.

1 year MS in Analytics from places like Fordham, Purdue and CUNY are still better than MBA from similarly ranked schools IF your sole criteria is having the flexibility to work for 3 year on an OPT in US. MS programs are 1 year so your cost of living and wages lost is only for 1 year instead of 2 years needed in MBA. Of course ROI will depend upon fees, scholarships, cost of living, your salary post MBA/MS. [/quote]

Thank you for confirming! I definitely want to be able to gain more than a year-long work experience if I can. My interest area will primarily be Marketing. Although, I wanted someone to give me an honest opinion on any demerits of coming to the US to specialize in Marketing. As far as I know, home-grown talent in Marketing is not lacking. Considering this, does it make sense for an immigrant to come to the US to get a concentration in Marketing (MBA/MS) and expect job opportunities - especially since recruiters are wary of employing immigrants full time or filing an H1B for them?

Thank you!
quote
Ayon
Marketing is a very broad area. Usually marketing roles go to local people since they know the culture best. Any client facing or strategy associated roles would go to locals. (e.g. Product Management - non technical, Brand strategy etc.)

The area where there may not be enough locals is analytics - marketing analytics. They usually look for a tool person. who can run xxx tool and provides insights. Usually local talent pool doesn't want to limit themselves to the "tool guy" or girl.

My sister after completing her MSMI from Fordham is working in UM worldwide as Sr. analyst. She had 5 years of experience in marketing back in India and was a Manager. Yet her company doesn't promote her. She and her 4-5 colleagues from India are all sulking at Analyst/Sr. Analyst roles since that's the ceiling. whereas a 23 year old English graduate joins and after 3 months is promoted to Manager. Since she was a "better fit". Call it racism or whatever. US can work in your favor only when you have a skill set that's lacking in US market.

Check out jobs at Capital One. They very clearly mention for positions like Project Management, Process Management, etc. that they won't sponsor H1B. They hire undergrads who then become manager in 1-2 years. All Indians apply for Operations Analyst / Data Analyst / coding roles and keep doing that kind of work for years. So they Join as Analyst and after 5 years their title change to Principle Data Analyst.
Marketing is a very broad area. Usually marketing roles go to local people since they know the culture best. Any client facing or strategy associated roles would go to locals. (e.g. Product Management - non technical, Brand strategy etc.)

The area where there may not be enough locals is analytics - marketing analytics. They usually look for a tool person. who can run xxx tool and provides insights. Usually local talent pool doesn't want to limit themselves to the "tool guy" or girl.

My sister after completing her MSMI from Fordham is working in UM worldwide as Sr. analyst. She had 5 years of experience in marketing back in India and was a Manager. Yet her company doesn't promote her. She and her 4-5 colleagues from India are all sulking at Analyst/Sr. Analyst roles since that's the ceiling. whereas a 23 year old English graduate joins and after 3 months is promoted to Manager. Since she was a "better fit". Call it racism or whatever. US can work in your favor only when you have a skill set that's lacking in US market.

Check out jobs at Capital One. They very clearly mention for positions like Project Management, Process Management, etc. that they won't sponsor H1B. They hire undergrads who then become manager in 1-2 years. All Indians apply for Operations Analyst / Data Analyst / coding roles and keep doing that kind of work for years. So they Join as Analyst and after 5 years their title change to Principle Data Analyst.
quote
mba hipste...
That's some great background, Ayon. I'd add that yes, these skills are in demand by US firms - especially for roles at the analyst level - and if you want to land a job like that a specialized MSc in analytics / etc. is a good way to go. Just be aware of the visa issues involved - many immigrants have to return home when they lose out on the H1B lottery. Not always the case but it does happen. If your overall goal is to work in the US, and you can't get into a top 20 MBA, then this (a quant MSc to an analyst-level job) is a valid route.
That's some great background, Ayon. I'd add that yes, these skills are in demand by US firms - especially for roles at the analyst level - and if you want to land a job like that a specialized MSc in analytics / etc. is a good way to go. Just be aware of the visa issues involved - many immigrants have to return home when they lose out on the H1B lottery. Not always the case but it does happen. If your overall goal is to work in the US, and you can't get into a top 20 MBA, then this (a quant MSc to an analyst-level job) is a valid route.
quote
priya08
Marketing is a very broad area. Usually marketing roles go to local people since they know the culture best. Any client facing or strategy associated roles would go to locals. (e.g. Product Management - non technical, Brand strategy etc.)

The area where there may not be enough locals is analytics - marketing analytics. They usually look for a tool person. who can run xxx tool and provides insights. Usually local talent pool doesn't want to limit themselves to the "tool guy" or girl.

My sister after completing her MSMI from Fordham is working in UM worldwide as Sr. analyst. She had 5 years of experience in marketing back in India and was a Manager. Yet her company doesn't promote her. She and her 4-5 colleagues from India are all sulking at Analyst/Sr. Analyst roles since that's the ceiling. whereas a 23 year old English graduate joins and after 3 months is promoted to Manager. Since she was a "better fit". Call it racism or whatever. US can work in your favor only when you have a skill set that's lacking in US market.

Check out jobs at Capital One. They very clearly mention for positions like Project Management, Process Management, etc. that they won't sponsor H1B. They hire undergrads who then become manager in 1-2 years. All Indians apply for Operations Analyst / Data Analyst / coding roles and keep doing that kind of work for years. So they Join as Analyst and after 5 years their title change to Principle Data Analyst.


Thank you sharing your views! This answers a lot of my questions and motivates me to dig deeper into post-MBA job opportunities in the US. My goal was to get a concentration in Marketing if I did an MBA, and if not, I was precisely looking up the MSMI program at Fordham. Thank you for sharing your sister and her colleagues' journies. Also, if it is not too much to ask, is it possible to connect with your sister on LinkedIn to know more about the MSMI program from an alumni's prospective? I too am an Indian female so learning more about her experiences and background should give me more clarity. :)

Also, when you say that US works in your favor only when you have a skillset that's lacking in the US market, do you mean that jobs one gets via the "MS route?" And, what according to you, should be the safest (or more job gauranteeing) concentration / specialization to get in an MBA program in the US for immigrants?

I'm sorry if I am asking too many questions, but I think I gain to learn more all your views before I invest in an expensive degree and a few years of my life. So, thank you so much for all your time!
[quote]Marketing is a very broad area. Usually marketing roles go to local people since they know the culture best. Any client facing or strategy associated roles would go to locals. (e.g. Product Management - non technical, Brand strategy etc.)

The area where there may not be enough locals is analytics - marketing analytics. They usually look for a tool person. who can run xxx tool and provides insights. Usually local talent pool doesn't want to limit themselves to the "tool guy" or girl.

My sister after completing her MSMI from Fordham is working in UM worldwide as Sr. analyst. She had 5 years of experience in marketing back in India and was a Manager. Yet her company doesn't promote her. She and her 4-5 colleagues from India are all sulking at Analyst/Sr. Analyst roles since that's the ceiling. whereas a 23 year old English graduate joins and after 3 months is promoted to Manager. Since she was a "better fit". Call it racism or whatever. US can work in your favor only when you have a skill set that's lacking in US market.

Check out jobs at Capital One. They very clearly mention for positions like Project Management, Process Management, etc. that they won't sponsor H1B. They hire undergrads who then become manager in 1-2 years. All Indians apply for Operations Analyst / Data Analyst / coding roles and keep doing that kind of work for years. So they Join as Analyst and after 5 years their title change to Principle Data Analyst.[/quote]

Thank you sharing your views! This answers a lot of my questions and motivates me to dig deeper into post-MBA job opportunities in the US. My goal was to get a concentration in Marketing if I did an MBA, and if not, I was precisely looking up the MSMI program at Fordham. Thank you for sharing your sister and her colleagues' journies. Also, if it is not too much to ask, is it possible to connect with your sister on LinkedIn to know more about the MSMI program from an alumni's prospective? I too am an Indian female so learning more about her experiences and background should give me more clarity. :)

Also, when you say that US works in your favor only when you have a skillset that's lacking in the US market, do you mean that jobs one gets via the "MS route?" And, what according to you, should be the safest (or more job gauranteeing) concentration / specialization to get in an MBA program in the US for immigrants?

I'm sorry if I am asking too many questions, but I think I gain to learn more all your views before I invest in an expensive degree and a few years of my life. So, thank you so much for all your time!
quote
priya08
That's some great background, Ayon. I'd add that yes, these skills are in demand by US firms - especially for roles at the analyst level - and if you want to land a job like that a specialized MSc in analytics / etc. is a good way to go. Just be aware of the visa issues involved - many immigrants have to return home when they lose out on the H1B lottery. Not always the case but it does happen. If your overall goal is to work in the US, and you can't get into a top 20 MBA, then this (a quant MSc to an analyst-level job) is a valid route.


Thanks for sharing and adding to Ayon's point above! So, when you say if not a t20 MBA, you mean it's not worth getting an MBA otherwise? And would you say a course like MSMI (MS in Marketing Intelligence) from Fordham should be equivalent to a t20 MBA career-prosepect wise, if not compensation wise? I also read that MSMI gives a 3 year OPT, so it's not really a bad route to try and look for an employer who may be able to file an H1B.

And, what according to you should be the skills sets most lacking in the US?
[quote]That's some great background, Ayon. I'd add that yes, these skills are in demand by US firms - especially for roles at the analyst level - and if you want to land a job like that a specialized MSc in analytics / etc. is a good way to go. Just be aware of the visa issues involved - many immigrants have to return home when they lose out on the H1B lottery. Not always the case but it does happen. If your overall goal is to work in the US, and you can't get into a top 20 MBA, then this (a quant MSc to an analyst-level job) is a valid route.[/quote]

Thanks for sharing and adding to Ayon's point above! So, when you say if not a t20 MBA, you mean it's not worth getting an MBA otherwise? And would you say a course like MSMI (MS in Marketing Intelligence) from Fordham should be equivalent to a t20 MBA career-prosepect wise, if not compensation wise? I also read that MSMI gives a 3 year OPT, so it's not really a bad route to try and look for an employer who may be able to file an H1B.

And, what according to you should be the skills sets most lacking in the US?
quote
Arjun 02
Good evening, can anybody tell me about the career prospects for an Indian students doing the 1 year MBA at the Katz Graduate School of Business?
Good evening, can anybody tell me about the career prospects for an Indian students doing the 1 year MBA at the Katz Graduate School of Business?
quote
mba hipste...
Assuming you don't already have a visa that allows you to work in the US, then you'd run into the same issues as the posters above: you'd leave the program with a temporary OPT visa, on which you'd be able to work in the country for one year. After that, assuming you land a job, you'd most likely need to transition to an H1B visa, which is awarded via lottery.

On specific opportunities: you should ask the school about who their recruiters are, and whether or not they tend to hire people in your situation. It's entirely likely that some employers might look at OPT visa holders as risky bets, given the temporary nature of the visa. However, some employers might also be willing to hire you on a one-year contract. It all depends on many factors, including the firms you want to work in, the industry, etc.
Assuming you don't already have a visa that allows you to work in the US, then you'd run into the same issues as the posters above: you'd leave the program with a temporary OPT visa, on which you'd be able to work in the country for one year. After that, assuming you land a job, you'd most likely need to transition to an H1B visa, which is awarded via lottery.

On specific opportunities: you should ask the school about who their recruiters are, and whether or not they tend to hire people in your situation. It's entirely likely that some employers might look at OPT visa holders as risky bets, given the temporary nature of the visa. However, some employers might also be willing to hire you on a one-year contract. It all depends on many factors, including the firms you want to work in, the industry, etc.
quote
Ayon
Katz is a good school - as in it provides great value for money. However last I checked, To be eligible for their 1 year MBA you should have done your undergrad in Business (usually a 4 year course) from a AACSB accredited school. Indian undergraduate studies in business doesn't qualify.
Katz is a good school - as in it provides great value for money. However last I checked, To be eligible for their 1 year MBA you should have done your undergrad in Business (usually a 4 year course) from a AACSB accredited school. Indian undergraduate studies in business doesn't qualify.
quote
Arjun 02
I see, I didn't realize that! I will have to come up with a new plan then.
I see, I didn't realize that! I will have to come up with a new plan then.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Business Schools

Atlanta, Georgia 29 Followers 60 Discussions
Notre Dame, Indiana 12 Followers 39 Discussions
Ithaca, New York 75 Followers 126 Discussions

Related Articles

Shorter, Faster, Better? One-Year MBA Programs in the US

Apr 27, 2015

A growing number of US-based business schools are offering one-year MBAs. How do they stack up to their two-year counterparts?

More Articles

Related Top 10 Lists

More Top 10 Lists