MBA in Germany


Duncan

The best way to do this is through research. Use LinkedIn to see the backgrounds of people in your target roles. Maybe reach out to some of them.

The best way to do this is through research. Use LinkedIn to see the backgrounds of people in your target roles. Maybe reach out to some of them.
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marshtea

I'm a 33yo from the US. I have been in Germany for 4 years now. While I don't work in your desired industry, my job is in corporate development/strategy, so it is the internal version of what you want to do.

I definitely want to second that this language is not easy. I learned English and tested native level within 6 months as a kid immigrating to the US, and I was at conversational level Spanish within 6 months of working in South America in my mid-20's. However I'm still no where near B1 right now in German. One reason is actually because of the work I do requires me to communicate myself in the most precise way, so I don't really speak German at work at all. Also my industry and Germany as a whole is pretty conservative, and I feel like broken German actually is worse than perfect English. The thing is the kind of work you want to do actually requires sophisticated, business German and not just normal conversational German. 

Speaking of career prospective, I made what many would call a good career development in the last 4 years and am now the head of my function and reporting directly to the C-suites. But, I do feel the limitations brought on by my lack of German abilities and am actually considering moving back to the states. I work in a mid-cap company with many international locations, but the HQ is still overwhelmingly German. This is typical for most companies here. I have friends who work in much larger companies and report much better globalization, and some of those companies have set the working language to English. However, in the end you're still looking at a very limited pool of such companies, and as a consultant you cannot afford to be so picky to which client you can serve. 

I'm a 33yo from the US. I have been in Germany for 4 years now. While I don't work in your desired industry, my job is in corporate development/strategy, so it is the internal version of what you want to do.<br><br>I definitely want to second that this language is not easy. I learned English and tested native level within 6 months as a kid immigrating to the US, and I was at conversational level Spanish within 6 months of working in South America in my mid-20's. However I'm still no where near B1 right now in German. One reason is actually because of the work I do requires me to communicate myself in the most precise way, so I don't really speak German at work at all. Also my industry and Germany as a whole is pretty conservative, and I feel like broken German actually is worse than perfect English. The thing is the kind of work you want to do actually requires sophisticated, business German and not just normal conversational German.&nbsp;<br><br>Speaking of career prospective, I made what many would call a good career development in the last 4 years and am now the head of my function and reporting directly to the C-suites. But, I do feel the limitations brought on by my lack of German abilities and am actually considering moving back to the states. I work in a mid-cap company with many international locations, but the HQ is still overwhelmingly German. This is typical for most companies here. I have friends who work in much larger companies and report much better globalization, and some of those companies have set the working language to English. However, in the end you're still looking at a very limited pool of such companies, and as a consultant you cannot afford to be so picky to which client you can serve.&nbsp;<br><br>
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Duncan

It's never too late. Your background is unusual, but that brings perspectives that will be useful, as will your CFA charter. 

I think the challenge isn't your approach, but rather having clarity on the specific outcomes. Without that, it's hard to assess the fit of the available options. For example, and how can you hard a sharper focus than "UK/Germany/Denmark/Netherlands "

It's never too late. Your background is unusual, but that brings perspectives that will be useful, as will your CFA charter.&nbsp;<br><br>I think the challenge isn't your approach, but rather having clarity on the specific outcomes. Without that, it's hard to assess the fit of the available options. For example, and how can you hard a sharper focus than "UK/Germany/Denmark/Netherlands&nbsp;"
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Inactive User

Great advice above ^^ about the language.

At the end, if you're not showing up ready to start your MBA without a solid understanding of German - either fluent or near to fluent - you will probably have to expect to take a hit on seniority / salary when you exit the program.

There might be more technically-oriented roles available to people without a perfect command of the language, but 'MBA' level / management roles will be fewer and far between. 

Great advice above ^^ about the language.<br><br>At the end, if you're not showing up ready to start your MBA without a solid understanding of German - either fluent or near to fluent - you will probably have to expect to take a hit on seniority / salary when you exit the program.<br><br>There might be more technically-oriented roles available to people without a perfect command of the language, but 'MBA' level / management roles will be fewer and far between.&nbsp;
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