ASU - Carey Announces 120 Full-Tuition MBA Scholarships

New scholarship program aimed at people who want to give back to their communities

Arizona State University's Carey School of Business has announced that it is launching a large number of full-tuition MBA scholarships, aimed at students who desire to do good. 

In the "Forward Focus" MBA initiative, up to 120 scholarships will be available to give back to their communities through nonprofit work or innovative startups struggling to launch.

For example, if "someone has a great start-up idea, and they know they would be more successful in their venture if they had the skills and networking that an MBA would give them, they might be concerned about spending the money because it takes away from the capital needed for the start-up venture,” according to dean Amy Hillman.

Likewise, MBA expertise in fields like supply chain management could be a huge benefit for a leader of a non-profit relief agency who must coordinate transportation and logistics.

The scholarships will be available for full-time MBA students beginning in the fall of 2016; and the school says it's committed to the program beyond next year. The normal tuition fees for Carey's full-time MBA program is $54,000 for Arizona residents, $87,000 for non-residents, and $90,000 for international students.

For more information, please see the ASU - Carey news release announcing the launch of the Forward Focus MBA program.

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