Schools interested in candidates of age 30 and beyond?


ramdi
Hi friends,
It's a common observation that Business schools all over the world are prefering younger candidates. Admission for aspirants who are in 30 - 35 years category with experience from 6 - 12 years is getting tougher. Actually such students are considered too old for an MBA and too young for an Executive MBA. What do you think is the best solution for such candidates?
Please also mention the schools, you think are interested (or consider actively) in such candidates in US, Europe and Asia.
I am sure a lot of candidates must have felt this way (or would be in the same boat). Hence any observations/feedback/comments in this regard are gratefully welocme.

Thanks and regards,
Ram
Hi friends,
It's a common observation that Business schools all over the world are prefering younger candidates. Admission for aspirants who are in 30 - 35 years category with experience from 6 - 12 years is getting tougher. Actually such students are considered too old for an MBA and too young for an Executive MBA. What do you think is the best solution for such candidates?
Please also mention the schools, you think are interested (or consider actively) in such candidates in US, Europe and Asia.
I am sure a lot of candidates must have felt this way (or would be in the same boat). Hence any observations/feedback/comments in this regard are gratefully welocme.

Thanks and regards,
Ram
quote
ramdi
Lots of views but no comments !!!
Am I the only one to have faced or observed this? :-)

Hi friends,
It's a common observation that Business schools all over the world are prefering younger candidates. Admission for aspirants who are in 30 - 35 years category with experience from 6 - 12 years is getting tougher. Actually such students are considered too old for an MBA and too young for an Executive MBA. What do you think is the best solution for such candidates?
Please also mention the schools, you think are interested (or consider actively) in such candidates in US, Europe and Asia.
I am sure a lot of candidates must have felt this way (or would be in the same boat). Hence any observations/feedback/comments in this regard are gratefully welocme.

Thanks and regards,
Ram
Lots of views but no comments !!!
Am I the only one to have faced or observed this? :-)

<blockquote>Hi friends,
It's a common observation that Business schools all over the world are prefering younger candidates. Admission for aspirants who are in 30 - 35 years category with experience from 6 - 12 years is getting tougher. Actually such students are considered too old for an MBA and too young for an Executive MBA. What do you think is the best solution for such candidates?
Please also mention the schools, you think are interested (or consider actively) in such candidates in US, Europe and Asia.
I am sure a lot of candidates must have felt this way (or would be in the same boat). Hence any observations/feedback/comments in this regard are gratefully welocme.

Thanks and regards,
Ram</blockquote>
quote
Hi Ram,

My advice would be to look for a list of target schools and then find the age range of all of them. There are many many B-Schools aorund the world, and if you have a good profile, no matter of age.

For instance, in Europe, IMD has an MBA which is very exclusive and most of the class is around 30s-35s, so you would fit very well. But, of course they are very demanding regarding the quality of the applications.

Which kind of experience do you have? Where are you from? Your GMAT? Your career goals (sector/ geograph)?
These are important questions that you should provide to the forum in order to receive more feedback.

SingleSpain
Hi Ram,

My advice would be to look for a list of target schools and then find the age range of all of them. There are many many B-Schools aorund the world, and if you have a good profile, no matter of age.

For instance, in Europe, IMD has an MBA which is very exclusive and most of the class is around 30s-35s, so you would fit very well. But, of course they are very demanding regarding the quality of the applications.

Which kind of experience do you have? Where are you from? Your GMAT? Your career goals (sector/ geograph)?
These are important questions that you should provide to the forum in order to receive more feedback.

SingleSpain

quote
ramdi
Hi SingleSpain,
Thanks a lot for your reply.
I am in Electronics industry, working for Siemens in Singapore. I have a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering from the top university in India (IIT). My total work experience is 8 years in Electronics indistry and I have worked for Motorla and Philips in the past. The downside is my GMAT score (660) which I may have to take once again and my nationality (India). After all, an Indian, IT male is the most common species in the MBA application pool :-). An age of 32 makes it even worse.
Post-MBA, I want to go into management consulting or corporate strategy ....
Coming to IMD, it does not have lots of seats (just 90) and that means just one or two seats for an Indian (IT & male to top it...). I applied there this year and got a ding. Actually I started this thread only after hearing from them :-( There seem to be very few colleges which entertain applicants in 30+ pool..... I feel I am too old for an MBA but too young for an executive MBA...
What's your suggestion in this regard and the colleges I should target?

Hi Ram,

My advice would be to look for a list of target schools and then find the age range of all of them. There are many many B-Schools aorund the world, and if you have a good profile, no matter of age.

For instance, in Europe, IMD has an MBA which is very exclusive and most of the class is around 30s-35s, so you would fit very well. But, of course they are very demanding regarding the quality of the applications.

Which kind of experience do you have? Where are you from? Your GMAT? Your career goals (sector/ geograph)?
These are important questions that you should provide to the forum in order to receive more feedback.

SingleSpain

Hi SingleSpain,
Thanks a lot for your reply.
I am in Electronics industry, working for Siemens in Singapore. I have a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering from the top university in India (IIT). My total work experience is 8 years in Electronics indistry and I have worked for Motorla and Philips in the past. The downside is my GMAT score (660) which I may have to take once again and my nationality (India). After all, an Indian, IT male is the most common species in the MBA application pool :-). An age of 32 makes it even worse.
Post-MBA, I want to go into management consulting or corporate strategy ....
Coming to IMD, it does not have lots of seats (just 90) and that means just one or two seats for an Indian (IT & male to top it...). I applied there this year and got a ding. Actually I started this thread only after hearing from them :-( There seem to be very few colleges which entertain applicants in 30+ pool..... I feel I am too old for an MBA but too young for an executive MBA...
What's your suggestion in this regard and the colleges I should target?

<blockquote>Hi Ram,

My advice would be to look for a list of target schools and then find the age range of all of them. There are many many B-Schools aorund the world, and if you have a good profile, no matter of age.

For instance, in Europe, IMD has an MBA which is very exclusive and most of the class is around 30s-35s, so you would fit very well. But, of course they are very demanding regarding the quality of the applications.

Which kind of experience do you have? Where are you from? Your GMAT? Your career goals (sector/ geograph)?
These are important questions that you should provide to the forum in order to receive more feedback.

SingleSpain

</blockquote>
quote
Hello Ram,

your information is very usefull in order to understand your position.
As you mention, your profile is the most common for Indians applicants, but you should higlight your candidature not only for the "facts and numbers" but also for your quality and potential as a future manager.

I would choose a pool of schools, at least 5 (if your target is Europe) as your chances of being accepted are higher. Also note that this year with the Financial Crisis, many people will consider to apply to a B-School than a non-crisis year.

Also, UK Schools, as you may see at their web pages, tend to have a more senior profile.

My preferences in the UK: LBS, Oxford, Cambridge, Crainfield, Manchester.

If you consider Spanish Schools, I may also give some kind of advice (IE, ESADE, IESE).

HEC and RSM are also very good choices.

Regards,

SingleSpain
Hello Ram,

your information is very usefull in order to understand your position.
As you mention, your profile is the most common for Indians applicants, but you should higlight your candidature not only for the "facts and numbers" but also for your quality and potential as a future manager.

I would choose a pool of schools, at least 5 (if your target is Europe) as your chances of being accepted are higher. Also note that this year with the Financial Crisis, many people will consider to apply to a B-School than a non-crisis year.

Also, UK Schools, as you may see at their web pages, tend to have a more senior profile.

My preferences in the UK: LBS, Oxford, Cambridge, Crainfield, Manchester.

If you consider Spanish Schools, I may also give some kind of advice (IE, ESADE, IESE).

HEC and RSM are also very good choices.

Regards,

SingleSpain

quote
ramdi
Hi SingleSpain,
Thanks a lot for your prompt feedback.
Even I have realized now that I stand better chances of admission in European schools (rather than US schools). Yes, it's very cometitive this year and I am too late to apply too. My GMAT could also be a handicap for this year so it's better to improve the score again and apply next year...
However, just a few thoughts -
(1) I have been a bit sceptic about spanish schools as my goal is to join in consulting and I have no proficiency in any European languages besides English ;-) I think it would be a must to learn Spanish for a Spanish MBA program and a job in consultancy thereafter.... What do you say?

(2) What's your opinion on INSEAD (may be you forgot to include it in your list)? How do you compare it with HEC?

Thanks once again for your useful inputs!

Hello Ram,

your information is very usefull in order to understand your position.
As you mention, your profile is the most common for Indians applicants, but you should higlight your candidature not only for the "facts and numbers" but also for your quality and potential as a future manager.

I would choose a pool of schools, at least 5 (if your target is Europe) as your chances of being accepted are higher. Also note that this year with the Financial Crisis, many people will consider to apply to a B-School than a non-crisis year.

Also, UK Schools, as you may see at their web pages, tend to have a more senior profile.

My preferences in the UK: LBS, Oxford, Cambridge, Crainfield, Manchester.

If you consider Spanish Schools, I may also give some kind of advice (IE, ESADE, IESE).

HEC and RSM are also very good choices.

Regards,

SingleSpain

Hi SingleSpain,
Thanks a lot for your prompt feedback.
Even I have realized now that I stand better chances of admission in European schools (rather than US schools). Yes, it's very cometitive this year and I am too late to apply too. My GMAT could also be a handicap for this year so it's better to improve the score again and apply next year...
However, just a few thoughts -
(1) I have been a bit sceptic about spanish schools as my goal is to join in consulting and I have no proficiency in any European languages besides English ;-) I think it would be a must to learn Spanish for a Spanish MBA program and a job in consultancy thereafter.... What do you say?

(2) What's your opinion on INSEAD (may be you forgot to include it in your list)? How do you compare it with HEC?

Thanks once again for your useful inputs!

<blockquote>Hello Ram,

your information is very usefull in order to understand your position.
As you mention, your profile is the most common for Indians applicants, but you should higlight your candidature not only for the "facts and numbers" but also for your quality and potential as a future manager.

I would choose a pool of schools, at least 5 (if your target is Europe) as your chances of being accepted are higher. Also note that this year with the Financial Crisis, many people will consider to apply to a B-School than a non-crisis year.

Also, UK Schools, as you may see at their web pages, tend to have a more senior profile.

My preferences in the UK: LBS, Oxford, Cambridge, Crainfield, Manchester.

If you consider Spanish Schools, I may also give some kind of advice (IE, ESADE, IESE).

HEC and RSM are also very good choices.

Regards,

SingleSpain

</blockquote>
quote
Hi Ramdi,

Yes, is a bit late, but I would try to apply to some of the schools that may give you a good feedback regarding the timing (ask admit com of each school).

Regarding Spanish Schools:
a. Yes, learning Spanish is a must. Many people start from scratch and that's up to you how much you can learn. At least you should have an interest for the language.

b.Consultancy. Few foreign MBAs end working in Spain for consultancy because salaries are lower than in the UK or US and also because consultancies for their Spanish offices tend to hire Spanish people. IESE is the one´s that have more MBAs ending in Consultancy, but is a 2 years program. Esade has also 1 Year which should be good for a profile like you -mid 30s. Then, IE has the International MBA and the Domestic MBA, where the only interesting for you is the International.

Regarding Insead, of course is one of the top in Europe, and very well considered for Consultancy, probably you will find there many MCks or BCGs for their MBA and then they come back to their company. Regarding the comparison with HEC, Insead is the most global of both (for countries like India is more well known) and the alumni has a more extensive presence worldwide than HEC. But HEC has a also a very good reputation and is not very expensive as others.
Hi Ramdi,

Yes, is a bit late, but I would try to apply to some of the schools that may give you a good feedback regarding the timing (ask admit com of each school).

Regarding Spanish Schools:
a. Yes, learning Spanish is a must. Many people start from scratch and that's up to you how much you can learn. At least you should have an interest for the language.

b.Consultancy. Few foreign MBAs end working in Spain for consultancy because salaries are lower than in the UK or US and also because consultancies for their Spanish offices tend to hire Spanish people. IESE is the one´s that have more MBAs ending in Consultancy, but is a 2 years program. Esade has also 1 Year which should be good for a profile like you -mid 30s. Then, IE has the International MBA and the Domestic MBA, where the only interesting for you is the International.

Regarding Insead, of course is one of the top in Europe, and very well considered for Consultancy, probably you will find there many MCks or BCGs for their MBA and then they come back to their company. Regarding the comparison with HEC, Insead is the most global of both (for countries like India is more well known) and the alumni has a more extensive presence worldwide than HEC. But HEC has a also a very good reputation and is not very expensive as others.

quote
ramdi
Thanks SingleSpain for the useful insight.

Anyone else to add on to the current discussion? :-)

Hi Ramdi,

Yes, is a bit late, but I would try to apply to some of the schools that may give you a good feedback regarding the timing (ask admit com of each school).

Regarding Spanish Schools:
a. Yes, learning Spanish is a must. Many people start from scratch and that's up to you how much you can learn. At least you should have an interest for the language.

b.Consultancy. Few foreign MBAs end working in Spain for consultancy because salaries are lower than in the UK or US and also because consultancies for their Spanish offices tend to hire Spanish people. IESE is the one´s that have more MBAs ending in Consultancy, but is a 2 years program. Esade has also 1 Year which should be good for a profile like you -mid 30s. Then, IE has the International MBA and the Domestic MBA, where the only interesting for you is the International.

Regarding Insead, of course is one of the top in Europe, and very well considered for Consultancy, probably you will find there many MCks or BCGs for their MBA and then they come back to their company. Regarding the comparison with HEC, Insead is the most global of both (for countries like India is more well known) and the alumni has a more extensive presence worldwide than HEC. But HEC has a also a very good reputation and is not very expensive as others.

Thanks SingleSpain for the useful insight.

Anyone else to add on to the current discussion? :-)

<blockquote>Hi Ramdi,

Yes, is a bit late, but I would try to apply to some of the schools that may give you a good feedback regarding the timing (ask admit com of each school).

Regarding Spanish Schools:
a. Yes, learning Spanish is a must. Many people start from scratch and that's up to you how much you can learn. At least you should have an interest for the language.

b.Consultancy. Few foreign MBAs end working in Spain for consultancy because salaries are lower than in the UK or US and also because consultancies for their Spanish offices tend to hire Spanish people. IESE is the one´s that have more MBAs ending in Consultancy, but is a 2 years program. Esade has also 1 Year which should be good for a profile like you -mid 30s. Then, IE has the International MBA and the Domestic MBA, where the only interesting for you is the International.

Regarding Insead, of course is one of the top in Europe, and very well considered for Consultancy, probably you will find there many MCks or BCGs for their MBA and then they come back to their company. Regarding the comparison with HEC, Insead is the most global of both (for countries like India is more well known) and the alumni has a more extensive presence worldwide than HEC. But HEC has a also a very good reputation and is not very expensive as others.

</blockquote>
quote
ramdi
anybody else? :-)
anybody else? :-)
quote
a_mukerjee
Hi Ramdi,

I am not so sure about your evaluation of that age group. In fact average age varies significantly among the different MBA programs in the world.
What you say might be valid for US schools, because they are not so focussed on students with professional experience. But in Europe several years of work experience are a must to be accepted in good programs, so students tend to be in their end twenties. If you are between 30 and 35 you are likely to be among the older students though.

I think it is also a good age to do an EMBA, if you have the according work experience which qualifies you to be accepted.
Hi Ramdi,

I am not so sure about your evaluation of that age group. In fact average age varies significantly among the different MBA programs in the world.
What you say might be valid for US schools, because they are not so focussed on students with professional experience. But in Europe several years of work experience are a must to be accepted in good programs, so students tend to be in their end twenties. If you are between 30 and 35 you are likely to be among the older students though.

I think it is also a good age to do an EMBA, if you have the according work experience which qualifies you to be accepted.
quote
Regarding EMBA /MBA, I would recommend a fulltime MBA if you want to change your career (as you mentioned). Normally, very few EMBAS are career changes, because is nos very easy working and studying and also thinking in new companies.
Another interesting factor is the 1/2 years program dilema. In the case of the 30s, a 1 year is probably a better decision.
Regarding EMBA /MBA, I would recommend a fulltime MBA if you want to change your career (as you mentioned). Normally, very few EMBAS are career changes, because is nos very easy working and studying and also thinking in new companies.
Another interesting factor is the 1/2 years program dilema. In the case of the 30s, a 1 year is probably a better decision.




quote
ramdi
Regarding EMBA /MBA, I would recommend a fulltime MBA if you want to change your career (as you mentioned). Normally, very few EMBAS are career changes, because is nos very easy working and studying and also thinking in new companies.
Another interesting factor is the 1/2 years program dilema. In the case of the 30s, a 1 year is probably a better decision.



Hi SingleSpain,
Another question here -
how good are one-year MBAs for career change? Doesn't one miss out on internship opportunities?

Do you have any inklings on 1-year MBA programs in US (especially when they are compared to the ones from Europe)?

Thanks!
<blockquote>Regarding EMBA /MBA, I would recommend a fulltime MBA if you want to change your career (as you mentioned). Normally, very few EMBAS are career changes, because is nos very easy working and studying and also thinking in new companies.
Another interesting factor is the 1/2 years program dilema. In the case of the 30s, a 1 year is probably a better decision.




</blockquote>
Hi SingleSpain,
Another question here -
how good are one-year MBAs for career change? Doesn't one miss out on internship opportunities?

Do you have any inklings on 1-year MBA programs in US (especially when they are compared to the ones from Europe)?

Thanks!
quote
The 2 Year program is the most suitable kind of MBA for career changes, as you stated, the internship opp is the best opp for a change. Nevertheless, some MBAs have an internship opp also after the 1 year, and then, they are hired fulltime.

In the US, I am not as familiar with the 1 year MBAs. As far as I know, Kellog and Cornell are one year. Both very well considered schools, among top 15 in the US.

Personally, my opinion is that in the mid 30s, the opp cost is too high for a 2 years MBA, so I would prefer for you a 1 year MBA. Checkout HEC MBA wich is the middle - 16 month- and they have also an internships.
The 2 Year program is the most suitable kind of MBA for career changes, as you stated, the internship opp is the best opp for a change. Nevertheless, some MBAs have an internship opp also after the 1 year, and then, they are hired fulltime.

In the US, I am not as familiar with the 1 year MBAs. As far as I know, Kellog and Cornell are one year. Both very well considered schools, among top 15 in the US.

Personally, my opinion is that in the mid 30s, the opp cost is too high for a 2 years MBA, so I would prefer for you a 1 year MBA. Checkout HEC MBA wich is the middle - 16 month- and they have also an internships.

quote
I am in a similar dilemma. I will be 33 at matriclation with 5 yrs of industrial experience (R&D) after PhD-Engineering. Any suggestions for me in consulting, finance for full time MBA in US? Many schools prefer younger candidates as said in the above quotes
I am in a similar dilemma. I will be 33 at matriclation with 5 yrs of industrial experience (R&D) after PhD-Engineering. Any suggestions for me in consulting, finance for full time MBA in US? Many schools prefer younger candidates as said in the above quotes
quote
ibanker
I think you should consider a 1 year MBA to minimize your opportunity cost. But you must be aware that the Careers functions of most schools will be geared towards helping younger students. So you will need to be prepared to network extensively yourself during the program. May be worth contacting headhunters now to get their opinion on whether they could help you.
I think you should consider a 1 year MBA to minimize your opportunity cost. But you must be aware that the Careers functions of most schools will be geared towards helping younger students. So you will need to be prepared to network extensively yourself during the program. May be worth contacting headhunters now to get their opinion on whether they could help you.
quote
RSMMBAGrad
I recently did an MBA at RSM and was over 30 when I entered. You will find that in the USA the average age at the programs is 26-28 but in Europe it is 29-31 at most programs. Given this, you are a better candidate for a European MBA program. Anyone with 8 years or more experience can go for an executive MBA program also, depending on the program. Be very careful about choosing an MBA program. Do not go to RSM -- a quarter of the students can't speak proper English, the professors are awful (2/3rds are flown in from other places since they are cheaper -- many came from the third world), the career centre hardly functions and very few people got good jobs, and the school is very badly run.

For full-time MBA programs, the ones that are really worth it in Europe are IMD, INSEAD, and LBS and maybe Cambridge, HEC (but only for jobs in France), and some of the Spanish schools (but only for jobs in Spain). Beyond that, the MBA programs are probably not worth the cost plus time out of the job market.
I recently did an MBA at RSM and was over 30 when I entered. You will find that in the USA the average age at the programs is 26-28 but in Europe it is 29-31 at most programs. Given this, you are a better candidate for a European MBA program. Anyone with 8 years or more experience can go for an executive MBA program also, depending on the program. Be very careful about choosing an MBA program. Do not go to RSM -- a quarter of the students can't speak proper English, the professors are awful (2/3rds are flown in from other places since they are cheaper -- many came from the third world), the career centre hardly functions and very few people got good jobs, and the school is very badly run.

For full-time MBA programs, the ones that are really worth it in Europe are IMD, INSEAD, and LBS and maybe Cambridge, HEC (but only for jobs in France), and some of the Spanish schools (but only for jobs in Spain). Beyond that, the MBA programs are probably not worth the cost plus time out of the job market.
quote
I am particularly looking at US/Canada locations. I know my 33 age at matriculation will be a concern. But still will give it a shot at scholarships. I am particularly interested in consulting and finance after my R&D experience in science. Let me know any fruitful advices on schools to apply in US canada regions and 1 yr MBAs for career changers
I recently did an MBA at RSM and was over 30 when I entered. You will find that in the USA the average age at the programs is 26-28 but in Europe it is 29-31 at most programs. Given this, you are a better candidate for a European MBA program. Anyone with 8 years or more experience can go for an executive MBA program also, depending on the program. Be very careful about choosing an MBA program. Do not go to RSM -- a quarter of the students can't speak proper English, the professors are awful (2/3rds are flown in from other places since they are cheaper -- many came from the third world), the career centre hardly functions and very few people got good jobs, and the school is very badly run.

For full-time MBA programs, the ones that are really worth it in Europe are IMD, INSEAD, and LBS and maybe Cambridge, HEC (but only for jobs in France), and some of the Spanish schools (but only for jobs in Spain). Beyond that, the MBA programs are probably not worth the cost plus time out of the job market.
I am particularly looking at US/Canada locations. I know my 33 age at matriculation will be a concern. But still will give it a shot at scholarships. I am particularly interested in consulting and finance after my R&D experience in science. Let me know any fruitful advices on schools to apply in US canada regions and 1 yr MBAs for career changers <blockquote>I recently did an MBA at RSM and was over 30 when I entered. You will find that in the USA the average age at the programs is 26-28 but in Europe it is 29-31 at most programs. Given this, you are a better candidate for a European MBA program. Anyone with 8 years or more experience can go for an executive MBA program also, depending on the program. Be very careful about choosing an MBA program. Do not go to RSM -- a quarter of the students can't speak proper English, the professors are awful (2/3rds are flown in from other places since they are cheaper -- many came from the third world), the career centre hardly functions and very few people got good jobs, and the school is very badly run.

For full-time MBA programs, the ones that are really worth it in Europe are IMD, INSEAD, and LBS and maybe Cambridge, HEC (but only for jobs in France), and some of the Spanish schools (but only for jobs in Spain). Beyond that, the MBA programs are probably not worth the cost plus time out of the job market.</blockquote>
quote
JohnnyL
I can only underline what the alumnus from RSM says. Europe may be the better place for you. Schools there are particularly interested in older candidates with a significant amount of work experience. And their programs normally last one year.
I can only underline what the alumnus from RSM says. Europe may be the better place for you. Schools there are particularly interested in older candidates with a significant amount of work experience. And their programs normally last one year.
quote
Magnet
RSM MBA - average age is 28 and I believe that the EMBA participants are a bit older.

Quite a cool 'what the participants say' videos on their website: http://www.rsm.nl/home/mba/emba/rsm_emba/participants

Helps you see what some of your potential class mates will be like!
RSM MBA - average age is 28 and I believe that the EMBA participants are a bit older.

Quite a cool 'what the participants say' videos on their website: http://www.rsm.nl/home/mba/emba/rsm_emba/participants

Helps you see what some of your potential class mates will be like!
quote
Many schools will value your professional work experience!

As Dean of MBA Programs at Suffolk University, let me introduce you to the Suffolk Global MBA.

Requires at least 3 years of professional work experience for admission consideration. Most admitted have more. IE I have excellent individuals in our incoming Fall 2010 class with 7 years, 10 years, 14 years of work experience.

*Is based on the strength of the MBA core curriculum.
*Every course beyond the core focuses on international business.
*Includes an intensive concentration in either international finance or international marketing.
Includes a one-week Global Travel Seminar to one of five countries.
*Most importantly, in the full-time program, it requires a 3-month full-time internship outside your home country - that must include a significant project in finance or marketing that adds value to the company.

We are only one example of a program that values professional work experience. Contact individual programs that provide the career focus you are interested in. Contact them and give them very brief facts about yourself and ask candidly if you would be considered a viable applicant. Do not ask, "will I be admitted?" or "Will you consider me?" Ask if you would be considered a viable applicant for XX program and also then ask, "please let me know the names of some current students who might have a similar background who would be willing to have an email conversation with me." Many schools will put you in touch with someone, alum or current student, who acts as an ambassador for the program.

Your GMAT score is excellent. Unfortunately, for Fall 2010 it is late. Some schools are on a rolling admission basis (as are we) and still accepting applications. Others are not. Check with the schools you are interested in. Also, ask in terms of deadlines, is the date for admission versus admission with scholarship different? That may or may not be a key for your consideration. Some schools have January starts....but always ask before you apply for a January start, are there opportunities for scholarships/fellowships for January admits? In some schools, most money in terms of scholarships, is given to Fall admits. If financing your degree is not an issue, a January admit date might be a good option for you.

Hopefully I've given you some good generic advice here....in addition to some information about our program. There are many excellent schools out there and I'm certain many will value your credentials!

www.globalmba.typepad.com Suffolk Global MBA internship blog - interning in Summer 2010 in 10 countries

www.suffolk.edu/globalmba for more information on the program

@DeanofBiz - Twitter

Best wishes!
Many schools will value your professional work experience!

As Dean of MBA Programs at Suffolk University, let me introduce you to the Suffolk Global MBA.

Requires at least 3 years of professional work experience for admission consideration. Most admitted have more. IE I have excellent individuals in our incoming Fall 2010 class with 7 years, 10 years, 14 years of work experience.

*Is based on the strength of the MBA core curriculum.
*Every course beyond the core focuses on international business.
*Includes an intensive concentration in either international finance or international marketing.
Includes a one-week Global Travel Seminar to one of five countries.
*Most importantly, in the full-time program, it requires a 3-month full-time internship outside your home country - that must include a significant project in finance or marketing that adds value to the company.

We are only one example of a program that values professional work experience. Contact individual programs that provide the career focus you are interested in. Contact them and give them very brief facts about yourself and ask candidly if you would be considered a viable applicant. Do not ask, "will I be admitted?" or "Will you consider me?" Ask if you would be considered a viable applicant for XX program and also then ask, "please let me know the names of some current students who might have a similar background who would be willing to have an email conversation with me." Many schools will put you in touch with someone, alum or current student, who acts as an ambassador for the program.

Your GMAT score is excellent. Unfortunately, for Fall 2010 it is late. Some schools are on a rolling admission basis (as are we) and still accepting applications. Others are not. Check with the schools you are interested in. Also, ask in terms of deadlines, is the date for admission versus admission with scholarship different? That may or may not be a key for your consideration. Some schools have January starts....but always ask before you apply for a January start, are there opportunities for scholarships/fellowships for January admits? In some schools, most money in terms of scholarships, is given to Fall admits. If financing your degree is not an issue, a January admit date might be a good option for you.

Hopefully I've given you some good generic advice here....in addition to some information about our program. There are many excellent schools out there and I'm certain many will value your credentials!

www.globalmba.typepad.com Suffolk Global MBA internship blog - interning in Summer 2010 in 10 countries

www.suffolk.edu/globalmba for more information on the program

@DeanofBiz - Twitter

Best wishes!
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