Please evaluate my profile


zor
Hi,can some one please evaluate my profile
Gmat:taken twice and the highest i could score is 590(v-34,m-38)
Toefl:98
Workex:3 years in india in an international investment firm as an accounting analyst worked on high networth institutional accounts.
Extracuricullar activities: play volleball at district level
Am looking for a 2 year MBA program in finance and want to pursue a career in corporate finance
please can you suggest me colleges in US which fit my profile
Hi,can some one please evaluate my profile
Gmat:taken twice and the highest i could score is 590(v-34,m-38)
Toefl:98
Workex:3 years in india in an international investment firm as an accounting analyst worked on high networth institutional accounts.
Extracuricullar activities: play volleball at district level
Am looking for a 2 year MBA program in finance and want to pursue a career in corporate finance
please can you suggest me colleges in US which fit my profile
quote
ralph
Your GMAT score is your weak point - if you think you are able to get some tutoring or other targeted advising and then retake to get 650+, your choices would be substantially better. But with that kind of score, you're really looking at programs like this:

Baruch/Zicklin
University of Miami
University of Tennessee/Knoxville
Syracuse University/Whitman

All have concentrations in finance - although whether it's worth it to do a concentration versus a general program is debatable (I'd say do a general program.)

Also, try to narrow down your options in terms of where in the States you'd like to be - because then you can get more specific about programs to target (and where you want to end up networking and working.) Like India, the US is a big place with vast differences in markets and industries depending on where exactly you are.
Your GMAT score is your weak point - if you think you are able to get some tutoring or other targeted advising and then retake to get 650+, your choices would be substantially better. But with that kind of score, you're really looking at programs like this:

Baruch/Zicklin
University of Miami
University of Tennessee/Knoxville
Syracuse University/Whitman

All have concentrations in finance - although whether it's worth it to do a concentration versus a general program is debatable (I'd say do a general program.)

Also, try to narrow down your options in terms of where in the States you'd like to be - because then you can get more specific about programs to target (and where you want to end up networking and working.) Like India, the US is a big place with vast differences in markets and industries depending on where exactly you are.
quote
Duncan
A low GMAT is especially a problem for finance. Which area of finance are you looking at?

I think Ralph might be a little optimistic. I'd suggest you look at Arkansas, Rutgers, Rollins, American, Bentley, Hofstra, Florida State,
A low GMAT is especially a problem for finance. Which area of finance are you looking at?

I think Ralph might be a little optimistic. I'd suggest you look at Arkansas, Rutgers, Rollins, American, Bentley, Hofstra, Florida State,
quote
zor
hi Ralph & Duncan,
Firstly,Thank u very much for d advice..am looking to pursue a career in Corporate finance.
i worte dis post on d day i gav d exam..i was paniced..gradually i came to my senses tht a good score atleast a 670+ is required to gt into a gud college.so i have started preparing...i hope my experince of 3 years wuld be sufficent since i quit d job to prepare for d gmat and hope to crack d gmat dis tym...
Regards.
hi Ralph & Duncan,
Firstly,Thank u very much for d advice..am looking to pursue a career in Corporate finance.
i worte dis post on d day i gav d exam..i was paniced..gradually i came to my senses tht a good score atleast a 670+ is required to gt into a gud college.so i have started preparing...i hope my experince of 3 years wuld be sufficent since i quit d job to prepare for d gmat and hope to crack d gmat dis tym...
Regards.
quote
Nalin
Retake GMAT, and improve your score. Your Indian background is a disadvantage for you. I found this statistics on a website. It was given by the person who developed business week B-school ranking.

"it?s important to keep in mind that the top U.S. business schools, relative to the overall applicant pool, are flooded with applications from Indian IT guys. That means that in general terms you are at a disadvantage. I have recently seen some fascinating data from a top ten school that I am willing to share with you to make this point: Last year, some 22% of all the applications received at this top ten school came from India alone. But only 7% of those Indian applicants were admitted to the school, and roughly 8% enrolled. In comparison, this school received 28% of its applicants from women but admitted 34% of the women and 30% ultimately enrolled. Some 7% of applicants were black and 9% were admitted, while 4% enrolled. In other words, you get the picture. The competition among Indians to get into top U.S. business schools is severe. So it?s keenly important that you are able to differentiate yourself in the pool."

Some of these schools have acceptance rate of over 25% but for Indians it's less than 10%. This just keeps me wondering about what admission committees say all the time that they don't distinguish applicants based on nationality but they seem to to do so. The above statement also makes the same claim.

So bottom line is improve your GMAT score even if you are not from IT background and not looking at high ranked colleges.
Retake GMAT, and improve your score. Your Indian background is a disadvantage for you. I found this statistics on a website. It was given by the person who developed business week B-school ranking.

"it?s important to keep in mind that the top U.S. business schools, relative to the overall applicant pool, are flooded with applications from Indian IT guys. That means that in general terms you are at a disadvantage. I have recently seen some fascinating data from a top ten school that I am willing to share with you to make this point: Last year, some 22% of all the applications received at this top ten school came from India alone. But only 7% of those Indian applicants were admitted to the school, and roughly 8% enrolled. In comparison, this school received 28% of its applicants from women but admitted 34% of the women and 30% ultimately enrolled. Some 7% of applicants were black and 9% were admitted, while 4% enrolled. In other words, you get the picture. The competition among Indians to get into top U.S. business schools is severe. So it?s keenly important that you are able to differentiate yourself in the pool."

Some of these schools have acceptance rate of over 25% but for Indians it's less than 10%. This just keeps me wondering about what admission committees say all the time that they don't distinguish applicants based on nationality but they seem to to do so. The above statement also makes the same claim.

So bottom line is improve your GMAT score even if you are not from IT background and not looking at high ranked colleges.
quote
ralph
Nalin makes some good points. Indeed, the "Indian with an IT background profile" is perhaps the most competitive one when applying to b-school.

That said, OP works in investments - which sets him apart from that profile class. But even so, he should still think about ways to get an edge - a better GMAT score being the obvious first step. But there are also other aspects to an applicant's profile, and I'd urge him to think about how he could set himself apart from the pack, especially in his application letters: what aspects of his background or experience make him unique compared to everybody else in his class?
Nalin makes some good points. Indeed, the "Indian with an IT background profile" is perhaps the most competitive one when applying to b-school.

That said, OP works in investments - which sets him apart from that profile class. But even so, he should still think about ways to get an edge - a better GMAT score being the obvious first step. But there are also other aspects to an applicant's profile, and I'd urge him to think about how he could set himself apart from the pack, especially in his application letters: what aspects of his background or experience make him unique compared to everybody else in his class?
quote

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