P/T or EMBA central CA area


Hello folks! I am a Federal GS employee in search of a EMBA or part time MBA program within a reasonable distance of Monterey CA. Reasonable being two hours or less.

My requirements are:
1. Must be delivered in a "real" classroom setting.
2. Preferably weekend format(Friday/Saturday) or other "live" format that would be conducive for a commuter.
3. Two hours or less from Monterey, CA.
4. Something that can be done as quickly as possible.
5. Preferably a program with some recognition.

Cal State has an online program close by but my taste for online course delivery is pretty low, and I get the feeling that the program has zero recognition.

What say the experts here on FMBA?
Hello folks! I am a Federal GS employee in search of a EMBA or part time MBA program within a reasonable distance of Monterey CA. Reasonable being two hours or less.

My requirements are:
1. Must be delivered in a "real" classroom setting.
2. Preferably weekend format(Friday/Saturday) or other "live" format that would be conducive for a commuter.
3. Two hours or less from Monterey, CA.
4. Something that can be done as quickly as possible.
5. Preferably a program with some recognition.

Cal State has an online program close by but my taste for online course delivery is pretty low, and I get the feeling that the program has zero recognition.

What say the experts here on FMBA?
quote
mcgr
Not an expert, but it seems like Berkeley or Wharton SF EMBA would be your best bet although both are at the range of your commute. The Berkeley program is Thursday - Saturday every three weeks, and Wharton is Fri-Sat every other week.

Here's a list of some of the best programs on the West Coast. Maybe another one of these programs will jump out at you.

https://www.ivyexec.com/best-executive-mba-rankings/west

[Edited by mcgr on Jun 03, 2017]

Not an expert, but it seems like Berkeley or Wharton SF EMBA would be your best bet although both are at the range of your commute. The Berkeley program is Thursday - Saturday every three weeks, and Wharton is Fri-Sat every other week.

Here's a list of some of the best programs on the West Coast. Maybe another one of these programs will jump out at you.

https://www.ivyexec.com/best-executive-mba-rankings/west

quote
MCGR, thank you very much for the reply. Both of those programs sound great, but the cost is prohibitive. How the heck can people afford to attend these programs?
It looks like SFSU or Pepperdine may be an option? If you have any other suggestions, please chime in.

Thank you
MCGR, thank you very much for the reply. Both of those programs sound great, but the cost is prohibitive. How the heck can people afford to attend these programs?
It looks like SFSU or Pepperdine may be an option? If you have any other suggestions, please chime in.

Thank you
quote
mcgr
No doubt they are very expensive, but when you look at things like average salary and salary growth after completing the programs, it can be easier to justify the cost. But the big question is what are you looking to get out of an MBA? Do you want to stay in the same area you're in now? Same type of work, but just in a more advanced position, or switching to something else? If an MBA is just a requirement you need to check a box to be eligible for a promotion in your federal position, and wage levels are fixed by position, than there might not be the same ROI for a top program you would get if you were in the private sector. So knowing why you want an MBA will go a long way to help narrow down your choices.

But in the meantime, another option to consider is some of the global EMBA programs. Some of these are structured in such a way that you're still getting face to face instruction for most of the class work, but those take place in a handful of international residencies in different countries. Duke has two programs that are very similar, but aimed at people at different stages of their career. University of Toronto is another, and it has the advantage of being pretty affordable. Both of these are pretty short programs also, with Duke's lasting 16 months and the UT one 18 I think. Just something to consider if you can have that kind of flexibility with your job.
No doubt they are very expensive, but when you look at things like average salary and salary growth after completing the programs, it can be easier to justify the cost. But the big question is what are you looking to get out of an MBA? Do you want to stay in the same area you're in now? Same type of work, but just in a more advanced position, or switching to something else? If an MBA is just a requirement you need to check a box to be eligible for a promotion in your federal position, and wage levels are fixed by position, than there might not be the same ROI for a top program you would get if you were in the private sector. So knowing why you want an MBA will go a long way to help narrow down your choices.

But in the meantime, another option to consider is some of the global EMBA programs. Some of these are structured in such a way that you're still getting face to face instruction for most of the class work, but those take place in a handful of international residencies in different countries. Duke has two programs that are very similar, but aimed at people at different stages of their career. University of Toronto is another, and it has the advantage of being pretty affordable. Both of these are pretty short programs also, with Duke's lasting 16 months and the UT one 18 I think. Just something to consider if you can have that kind of flexibility with your job.
quote
Those are very good questions MCGR! Actually I am trying to leave the federal system and go back to the private sector. An MBA would go a long way towards making the leap into the private sector. Ideally I would like to get back towards the Midwest, working in the same field, IT.
Having said that, the programs at Pepperdine and SFSU look like they might fit the bill. Or perhaps USF Executive MBA.
Do you have any opinions on these programs?
Thanks again for your input.
Those are very good questions MCGR! Actually I am trying to leave the federal system and go back to the private sector. An MBA would go a long way towards making the leap into the private sector. Ideally I would like to get back towards the Midwest, working in the same field, IT.
Having said that, the programs at Pepperdine and SFSU look like they might fit the bill. Or perhaps USF Executive MBA.
Do you have any opinions on these programs?
Thanks again for your input.


quote
mcgr
I'm just a prospective student as well, so no real input on any specific schools, but I will repeat the advice that's been given to me and many others on this board. If you can swing it, picking a school in the same general vicinity as where you'd like to relocate is a really smart idea, because you can use the alumni networks that will predominantly be from that vicinity as a resource to find opportunities where you want to work. That gives you a much better leg up than just the MBA credential without that local network.

There's a number of great options in the Midwest. I'm not sure which part of the Midwest you're thinking about, but Purdue's Global EMBA might work for you assuming you can get a sign off from your employer for that type of schedule.

https://www.ivyexec.com/best-executive-mba-rankings/imm-global-emba-program-review

The programs you mention in California are probably pretty good programs, but you need to ask if they'll be the best suited to meeting your long term goals vs. just being the most convenient now.
I'm just a prospective student as well, so no real input on any specific schools, but I will repeat the advice that's been given to me and many others on this board. If you can swing it, picking a school in the same general vicinity as where you'd like to relocate is a really smart idea, because you can use the alumni networks that will predominantly be from that vicinity as a resource to find opportunities where you want to work. That gives you a much better leg up than just the MBA credential without that local network.

There's a number of great options in the Midwest. I'm not sure which part of the Midwest you're thinking about, but Purdue's Global EMBA might work for you assuming you can get a sign off from your employer for that type of schedule.

https://www.ivyexec.com/best-executive-mba-rankings/imm-global-emba-program-review

The programs you mention in California are probably pretty good programs, but you need to ask if they'll be the best suited to meeting your long term goals vs. just being the most convenient now.

quote
Duncan
Purdue totally jumps out as a great option.

PS Its Global EMBA is the same price as the regular EMBA, and so better value. But if your focus is on the USA only then the regular EMBA (or even its much less costly weekend MBA, if you travel well) are options.

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 04, 2017]

Purdue totally jumps out as a great option.

PS Its Global EMBA is the same price as the regular EMBA, and so better value. But if your focus is on the USA only then the regular EMBA (or even its much less costly weekend MBA, if you travel well) are options.
quote
Duncan and mcgr, thank you both for the thoughtful replies. The Purdue program sounds interesting, but I don't think I could do the travel to W. Lafayette and Monterey CA.
Duncan, what's your take on the programs at Pepperdine and SFSU? Do they carry much weight outside of the CA/Bay area?
Thanks again for all the information and input.

[Edited by HyattHyatt on Jun 05, 2017]

Duncan and mcgr, thank you both for the thoughtful replies. The Purdue program sounds interesting, but I don't think I could do the travel to W. Lafayette and Monterey CA.
Duncan, what's your take on the programs at Pepperdine and SFSU? Do they carry much weight outside of the CA/Bay area?
Thanks again for all the information and input.

quote
mcgr
HyattHyatt,

I just want to make sure you realize, for the Global EMBA at Purdue, you would only need to travel to W. Lafayette for the first 5 day launch week. The other modules are spread out over 5 international residencies over 19 months. So basically you take a trip every 6 weeks or so to meetup in person with your cohort in a different country to learn the core MBA curriculum, but in the context of international business. As Duncan rightly notes, that might not be appropriate for someone who is focused on the U.S., but the plus side is that the structure makes it possible for people to attend these programs no matter where they are located.

For the West Coast schools, one resource is to look at the LinkedIn profile for the school, and see where the alumni have settled and in what companies and positions. Probably not surprising that most alumni of Pepperdine's business school are in the L.A. and Orange County area.

https://www.linkedin.com/school/15099501/alumni/
HyattHyatt,

I just want to make sure you realize, for the Global EMBA at Purdue, you would only need to travel to W. Lafayette for the first 5 day launch week. The other modules are spread out over 5 international residencies over 19 months. So basically you take a trip every 6 weeks or so to meetup in person with your cohort in a different country to learn the core MBA curriculum, but in the context of international business. As Duncan rightly notes, that might not be appropriate for someone who is focused on the U.S., but the plus side is that the structure makes it possible for people to attend these programs no matter where they are located.

For the West Coast schools, one resource is to look at the LinkedIn profile for the school, and see where the alumni have settled and in what companies and positions. Probably not surprising that most alumni of Pepperdine's business school are in the L.A. and Orange County area.

https://www.linkedin.com/school/15099501/alumni/
quote
Duncan
The Purdue EMBA has the same travel-friendly structure as its Global EMBA, except the modules are no overseas.
The Purdue EMBA has the same travel-friendly structure as its Global EMBA, except the modules are no overseas.
quote
mcgr
The Purdue EMBA has the same travel-friendly structure as its Global EMBA, except the modules are no overseas.


Good to know. I must have been looking at the P/T program that is every other weekend instead of the EMBA.
[quote]The Purdue EMBA has the same travel-friendly structure as its Global EMBA, except the modules are no overseas. [/quote]

Good to know. I must have been looking at the P/T program that is every other weekend instead of the EMBA.
quote
Duncan
I looked at the Global EMBA there when I was shopping around for MBAs, I am was very impressed with the solid curriculum design. It's very easy to produce an EMBA that just entertains the students (Which I guess is Pepperdine's reputation) or has dozens of micro-courses so the students don't have to really master the basics. Purdue makes sure that students go into the core MBA toolkit deeply and confidently (as, for example, Chicago also does). If one weekend a month might work for you, also look at the Simon EMBA.
I looked at the Global EMBA there when I was shopping around for MBAs, I am was very impressed with the solid curriculum design. It's very easy to produce an EMBA that just entertains the students (Which I guess is Pepperdine's reputation) or has dozens of micro-courses so the students don't have to really master the basics. Purdue makes sure that students go into the core MBA toolkit deeply and confidently (as, for example, Chicago also does). If one weekend a month might work for you, also look at the Simon EMBA.
quote
mcgr
Would Rochester make sense for someone looking to relocate to the Midwest?
Would Rochester make sense for someone looking to relocate to the Midwest?
quote
Duncan
Not as much as Purdue. The Fisher EMBA at OSU is also an option: it's three days a month.
Not as much as Purdue. The Fisher EMBA at OSU is also an option: it's three days a month.
quote
I looked at the Global EMBA there when I was shopping around for MBAs, I am was very impressed with the solid curriculum design. It's very easy to produce an EMBA that just entertains the students (Which I guess is Pepperdine's reputation) or has dozens of micro-courses so the students don't have to really master the basics. Purdue makes sure that students go into the core MBA toolkit deeply and confidently (as, for example, Chicago also does). If one weekend a month might work for you, also look at the Simon EMBA.

I definetly want to avoid any programs that are in the "entertain the students" category. Having said that it sounds like Pepperdine is not the way to go. That leaves me with SFSU here in the central CA area.
What's the opinion of the SFSU program?

Thanks again Duncan and mcgr.

I will check out the Purdue program.
[quote]I looked at the Global EMBA there when I was shopping around for MBAs, I am was very impressed with the solid curriculum design. It's very easy to produce an EMBA that just entertains the students (Which I guess is Pepperdine's reputation) or has dozens of micro-courses so the students don't have to really master the basics. Purdue makes sure that students go into the core MBA toolkit deeply and confidently (as, for example, Chicago also does). If one weekend a month might work for you, also look at the Simon EMBA. [/quote]
I definetly want to avoid any programs that are in the "entertain the students" category. Having said that it sounds like Pepperdine is not the way to go. That leaves me with SFSU here in the central CA area.
What's the opinion of the SFSU program?

Thanks again Duncan and mcgr.

I will check out the Purdue program.
quote

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