MSc Energy Mgmt. RGU vs. Strathclyde vs. ESCP


MirrorZ
Hello everyone,

as the headline displays already I am considering to take part in an Energy Management program, preferably of one of those institutions stated above.

Currently I am in my last semester of my undergraduate business studies and would like to get into one of the energy majors Management trainee programs (i.e. Shell, BP etc.). My interest would be especially related to commercial upstream programs as well as commercial downstream programs. (preference in the order listed)

Given the fact that I have just about one year of working experience (internships; partly in the oil and gas sector - supplier) I think an Energy Mgmt. Program would enhance my 'hard skills' necessary to improve my chances for both getting selected and performing well from the very beginning.


The key criteria for my decision would be as following:

1.) close hiring relationships with the energy industry (esp. Oil & Gas)

2.) genuine value-adding (industry related) input for a business undergrad.

3.) 12-15 months program

4.) location in Europe (due to study fees and further reasons)


Some pros and cons:

RGU: (Master in Energy Management) (9000 GBP)
pro:
- strong ties to the (local) Energy industry (Oil & Gas) for a considerable period (good related hiring record)
- well known for its Oil & Gas MBA (courses in the MSc Energy Mgmt. program abt 50% identical)
- strong focus on upstream
- intensive workload (90 ECTS --> 60+ ECTS energy related)
- Aberdeen as Oil & Gas centre of Europe

cons:
- none of the important accreditions (AACSB; EQUIS; AMBA)


Strathclyde (MSc in Global Energy Mgmt) (13000 GBP)
pro:
- strong ties to the (local) Energy industry (Oil & Gas) for considerable period
- Tripple crown accredition (good related hiring record)
- focus more mid-to-downstream
- certain degree of prestige

cons:
-program only partly energy related (about 35 ECTS out of 60 course related ECTS) as well as less Oil & Gas focused rather than generalized energy input


ESCP (MSc in Energy Management) (18500 GBP)
pro:
- Most prestigious among those instituions listed
- Triple Crown accredition
- Confirmation of value-adding courses by one of my friends studying the related program (more Finance focused input) (40 ECTS out of 60 ECTS energy related input)
- good mentoring program
- mid-to-downstream focused

cons:
- no obvious strong relationships with the Energy industry (esp. Oil and Gas) at the non-executive level. New program, started sept. 2013
- strong ESCP "umbrella brand", yet Energy Mgmt. just one of 18 random Mgmt courses (besides their flagship programs MEB and MIM)


The list stated above could be regarded as the information I have filtered from my personal research so far. However I would welcome any input from your side, helping me to find the most suitable match (as far as it can be derived by the given information above).

I am well aware that chances in this industry would be better with a solid engineering background. Nevertheless those Mgmt. programs I am aiming for are clearly labeled as commercial which encourages me to go for it.

Thank you for your input in advance!

Regards,
Hello everyone,

as the headline displays already I am considering to take part in an Energy Management program, preferably of one of those institutions stated above.

Currently I am in my last semester of my undergraduate business studies and would like to get into one of the energy majors Management trainee programs (i.e. Shell, BP etc.). My interest would be especially related to commercial upstream programs as well as commercial downstream programs. (preference in the order listed)

Given the fact that I have just about one year of working experience (internships; partly in the oil and gas sector - supplier) I think an Energy Mgmt. Program would enhance my 'hard skills' necessary to improve my chances for both getting selected and performing well from the very beginning.


The key criteria for my decision would be as following:

1.) close hiring relationships with the energy industry (esp. Oil & Gas)

2.) genuine value-adding (industry related) input for a business undergrad.

3.) 12-15 months program

4.) location in Europe (due to study fees and further reasons)


Some pros and cons:

RGU: (Master in Energy Management) (9000 GBP)
pro:
- strong ties to the (local) Energy industry (Oil & Gas) for a considerable period (good related hiring record)
- well known for its Oil & Gas MBA (courses in the MSc Energy Mgmt. program abt 50% identical)
- strong focus on upstream
- intensive workload (90 ECTS --> 60+ ECTS energy related)
- Aberdeen as Oil & Gas centre of Europe

cons:
- none of the important accreditions (AACSB; EQUIS; AMBA)



Strathclyde (MSc in Global Energy Mgmt) (13000 GBP)
pro:
- strong ties to the (local) Energy industry (Oil & Gas) for considerable period
- Tripple crown accredition (good related hiring record)
- focus more mid-to-downstream
- certain degree of prestige

cons:
-program only partly energy related (about 35 ECTS out of 60 course related ECTS) as well as less Oil & Gas focused rather than generalized energy input



ESCP (MSc in Energy Management) (18500 GBP)
pro:
- Most prestigious among those instituions listed
- Triple Crown accredition
- Confirmation of value-adding courses by one of my friends studying the related program (more Finance focused input) (40 ECTS out of 60 ECTS energy related input)
- good mentoring program
- mid-to-downstream focused

cons:
- no obvious strong relationships with the Energy industry (esp. Oil and Gas) at the non-executive level. New program, started sept. 2013
- strong ESCP "umbrella brand", yet Energy Mgmt. just one of 18 random Mgmt courses (besides their flagship programs MEB and MIM)


The list stated above could be regarded as the information I have filtered from my personal research so far. However I would welcome any input from your side, helping me to find the most suitable match (as far as it can be derived by the given information above).

I am well aware that chances in this industry would be better with a solid engineering background. Nevertheless those Mgmt. programs I am aiming for are clearly labeled as commercial which encourages me to go for it.

Thank you for your input in advance!

Regards,
quote
Duncan
I don't see why ESCP's portfolio of courses is any more or less random than anyone else's: it shows that ESCP has a portfolio of MS and MSc degrees where it is strong, rather than a general management MBA.

It has an amazing alumni network in energy companies like Total, EDF, GDF Suez, Shell, Areva.... and, if the 683 ESCP energy alumni on LinkedIn are representative, that network is split evenly between France and the rest of the world.

But if you don't speak French, I don't think it makes sense.

It sounds like RGU meets your criteria.
I don't see why ESCP's portfolio of courses is any more or less random than anyone else's: it shows that ESCP has a portfolio of MS and MSc degrees where it is strong, rather than a general management MBA.

It has an amazing alumni network in energy companies like Total, EDF, GDF Suez, Shell, Areva.... and, if the 683 ESCP energy alumni on LinkedIn are representative, that network is split evenly between France and the rest of the world.

But if you don't speak French, I don't think it makes sense.

It sounds like RGU meets your criteria.
quote
MirrorZ
Thank you for your input Duncan,

i agree you got a point concerning the ESCP Master program portfolio. Furthermore you indicated the ESCP has an outstanding 'brand value' especially as one of the 'grandes écoles' in France.
My french is probably not fluent enough to hit the french job market. However I have to admit that this one won't be one of my target markets.

What do you think about the strength of the student cohorts of any of the related schools listed?

Beyond that issue I have some thoughts about the different level of Accredition of my short listed schools. Do you think employers care a lot about it or would a strong energy-industry profile outweigh this 'lack' significantly? Same question related to potential business schools for Executive MBAs 10-15 years down the road.

Thank you!
Thank you for your input Duncan,

i agree you got a point concerning the ESCP Master program portfolio. Furthermore you indicated the ESCP has an outstanding 'brand value' especially as one of the 'grandes écoles' in France.
My french is probably not fluent enough to hit the french job market. However I have to admit that this one won't be one of my target markets.

What do you think about the strength of the student cohorts of any of the related schools listed?

Beyond that issue I have some thoughts about the different level of Accredition of my short listed schools. Do you think employers care a lot about it or would a strong energy-industry profile outweigh this 'lack' significantly? Same question related to potential business schools for Executive MBAs 10-15 years down the road.

Thank you!
quote
Duncan
Both are strong programmes with accreditation by the Energy Institute. RGU offers a huge discount for Europeans, and that's interesting.

I don't think there will be much difference, but I guess the Strathclyde programme will be more diverse, in terms of their professional and national backgrounds. Strathclyde seems to have more of a focus on renewables.

In terms of MBAs, then I think there will be a huge difference in the outcomes: a more diverse cohort will challenge people's soft skills.
Both are strong programmes with accreditation by the Energy Institute. RGU offers a huge discount for Europeans, and that's interesting.

I don't think there will be much difference, but I guess the Strathclyde programme will be more diverse, in terms of their professional and national backgrounds. Strathclyde seems to have more of a focus on renewables.

In terms of MBAs, then I think there will be a huge difference in the outcomes: a more diverse cohort will challenge people's soft skills.
quote

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