MBA in Global Affairs / International Business -- First/Next steps?


Hi All:

I need to bounce off some ideas. You seem to be thinking out of the box. :-)

I need to digress a little bit: I am German. After graduation I worked in Ireland and the US (did an internship in Russia during my college time, lived in Turkey as a child). I did have the US Green Card, but due to a family situation, I needed to leave the US, and since I stayed longer than a year outside the US I lost my Green Card. I know, I know. -- Long story why this happened. This is a very sore point. But it's done, and I need to move forward.

I speak 2 languages fluently (German and English) and 3 on intermediate level (French, Turkish, Russian). I have been looking for a job in Germany, but without any success. Currently, I am doing some consulting, but basically I am between jobs. I am 44 years old, and I need to work until at least 67, So, I feel it is still time to make a career change which is frowned upon here in Germany (here, I am considered old). Hence, it took me over a year to realize that I still could go back to college -- I was drifting for a while. -- Plus, I have been unhappy with my current profession which is a niche area of project management, and there are hardly any jobs in Germany, and I am considered old at the age of 44 (which also at times means too expensive). I miss the vibrant, diverse, and international life I had in the US. I just need to be again in an English-speaking country. Germany doesn't do it for me any longer which is definitely no adverse judgment on the country.

I like working in an international environment, I am interested in world affairs and world politics, and I feel that I can contribute to multinationals with my international background. I have been in the globalization field for quite some time now and I would like to fully move in that direction.

I would like to get an MBA in international business management / international affairs / global management, not just business administration in general.

I face the same issues as the others:
1) Selecting the country to study in. -- I am looking at the US, Canada, and UK.
2) Selecting the corresponding college.
3) Funding the student loan. -- This is issue # 1.

I am stuck. Ideally, I would like to start in Fall 2015 which seems to be out of the question. So, I am eyeing January 2016, but not sure if that's doable either.

From the outside, things might be clear, but sometimes it is difficult to see the woods for the trees. And since I have been getting "you can't" advice from my environment in Germany, I feel that I lost the ability to think out of the box. So, a fresh perspective from you is highly appreciated.

Thank you very much.
Hi All:

I need to bounce off some ideas. You seem to be thinking out of the box. :-)

I need to digress a little bit: I am German. After graduation I worked in Ireland and the US (did an internship in Russia during my college time, lived in Turkey as a child). I did have the US Green Card, but due to a family situation, I needed to leave the US, and since I stayed longer than a year outside the US I lost my Green Card. I know, I know. -- Long story why this happened. This is a very sore point. But it's done, and I need to move forward.

I speak 2 languages fluently (German and English) and 3 on intermediate level (French, Turkish, Russian). I have been looking for a job in Germany, but without any success. Currently, I am doing some consulting, but basically I am between jobs. I am 44 years old, and I need to work until at least 67, So, I feel it is still time to make a career change which is frowned upon here in Germany (here, I am considered old). Hence, it took me over a year to realize that I still could go back to college -- I was drifting for a while. -- Plus, I have been unhappy with my current profession which is a niche area of project management, and there are hardly any jobs in Germany, and I am considered old at the age of 44 (which also at times means too expensive). I miss the vibrant, diverse, and international life I had in the US. I just need to be again in an English-speaking country. Germany doesn't do it for me any longer which is definitely no adverse judgment on the country.

I like working in an international environment, I am interested in world affairs and world politics, and I feel that I can contribute to multinationals with my international background. I have been in the globalization field for quite some time now and I would like to fully move in that direction.

I would like to get an MBA in international business management / international affairs / global management, not just business administration in general.

I face the same issues as the others:
1) Selecting the country to study in. -- I am looking at the US, Canada, and UK.
2) Selecting the corresponding college.
3) Funding the student loan. -- This is issue # 1.

I am stuck. Ideally, I would like to start in Fall 2015 which seems to be out of the question. So, I am eyeing January 2016, but not sure if that's doable either.

From the outside, things might be clear, but sometimes it is difficult to see the woods for the trees. And since I have been getting "you can't" advice from my environment in Germany, I feel that I lost the ability to think out of the box. So, a fresh perspective from you is highly appreciated.

Thank you very much.
quote
ezra
Firstly, "Global Affairs / International Business" are quite broad and vague. I suggest you hone your career goals based on the following:

- what exactly do you see yourself doing after your MBA? Any specific functional area that interests you?
- do you have specific firms in mind?

From there you can research others who have jobs similar to what you're looking for and figure out the best strategy to get there.

Keep in mind that, depending on your career goals, you might see a lot of "you can't"s, regardless of where you are. I don't think that it's out of the question to make a career shift, but some industries and firms (the big consulting firms for instance,) are going to be generally looking for younger candidates. Other career paths might be more open, especially given your project management background.

In terms of starting in the spring, that's going to be very hard in the US, since most programs there start in the fall. Europe would be a better option: HEC Paris, RSM, EDHEC, and IMD all might be options. I think the application deadline for INSEAD's January start has passed.
Firstly, "Global Affairs / International Business" are quite broad and vague. I suggest you hone your career goals based on the following:

- what exactly do you see yourself doing after your MBA? Any specific functional area that interests you?
- do you have specific firms in mind?

From there you can research others who have jobs similar to what you're looking for and figure out the best strategy to get there.

Keep in mind that, depending on your career goals, you might see a lot of "you can't"s, regardless of where you are. I don't think that it's out of the question to make a career shift, but some industries and firms (the big consulting firms for instance,) are going to be generally looking for younger candidates. Other career paths might be more open, especially given your project management background.

In terms of starting in the spring, that's going to be very hard in the US, since most programs there start in the fall. Europe would be a better option: HEC Paris, RSM, EDHEC, and IMD all might be options. I think the application deadline for INSEAD's January start has passed.
quote
@ezra

Great tips. Thank you so much. I hadn't considered researching others who have jobs similar jobs and see how they made it. I know that I definitely need a degree in the business area. I have humanities and programming/some IT covered.

One mistake I made is that I have been contemplating for a very long time, because I thought that the job search would work out soon. And I didn't want to start school and new job at the same time. Plus, I need the income to be able to start school.

I would like to go into business analysis for globalization. So, when a company is considering business overseas or is already overseas and things are not working right, I would come in, analyze, and offer solution(s).

As for age, I don't consider 40 or 50 old. If we are old, then what is someone who is 60? :-) I am hoping that nontraditional applicants such as me will be considered because we have some life experience and a lot of work experience. A good mix of young, older, middle aged and 60+ isn't bad for a company.

I am more and more inclined to study in the UK. I won't be able to get a H1B visa, and it doesn't make sense to get the MBA in the US and then try to find work in the UK.

Thanks again for your feedback.
@ezra

Great tips. Thank you so much. I hadn't considered researching others who have jobs similar jobs and see how they made it. I know that I definitely need a degree in the business area. I have humanities and programming/some IT covered.

One mistake I made is that I have been contemplating for a very long time, because I thought that the job search would work out soon. And I didn't want to start school and new job at the same time. Plus, I need the income to be able to start school.

I would like to go into business analysis for globalization. So, when a company is considering business overseas or is already overseas and things are not working right, I would come in, analyze, and offer solution(s).

As for age, I don't consider 40 or 50 old. If we are old, then what is someone who is 60? :-) I am hoping that nontraditional applicants such as me will be considered because we have some life experience and a lot of work experience. A good mix of young, older, middle aged and 60+ isn't bad for a company.

I am more and more inclined to study in the UK. I won't be able to get a H1B visa, and it doesn't make sense to get the MBA in the US and then try to find work in the UK.

Thanks again for your feedback.
quote
ezra
Right, sounds like you're on the right track.

I didn't mean that 40 or 50 was too old. What I was suggesting was that there are certain fields and companies -- top tier consulting firms, for instance -- that prefer to hire younger candidates. This is just the nature of the business and the fact that they like candidates early in their careers who can be 'molded.' It's not every company and it's not every industry, and certainly there are exceptions, but it's just something to be aware of, especially for the firms that traditionally hire MBAs.
Right, sounds like you're on the right track.

I didn't mean that 40 or 50 was too old. What I was suggesting was that there are certain fields and companies -- top tier consulting firms, for instance -- that prefer to hire younger candidates. This is just the nature of the business and the fact that they like candidates early in their careers who can be 'molded.' It's not every company and it's not every industry, and certainly there are exceptions, but it's just something to be aware of, especially for the firms that traditionally hire MBAs.
quote
Elbrus
Hi, I am 42 too and on the same crossroads. Probably, I could give you some ideas, including those of financing. Have you passed your GMAT test yet? Have you considered doing an MBA on international affairs? What is your basic degree?

[Edited by Elbrus on Aug 05, 2015]

Hi, I am 42 too and on the same crossroads. Probably, I could give you some ideas, including those of financing. Have you passed your GMAT test yet? Have you considered doing an MBA on international affairs? What is your basic degree?
quote
@ezra

Thanks. No worries, I didn't take it the wrong way regarding age. Those jobs that the younger generation is entering aren't the ones I am looking for.

@Elbrus
Many thanks. I have a degree in engineering and translation studies, but I haven't worked as a translator since 2004. I moved to software localization and project management. I have experience in pharmacovigilance and the regulated environment in general as well. As a localization project manager, I am getting too old (which often means expensive). And I have done enough localization projects that I'd like to do something else or do something that is a notch higher. I have always been interested in international politics and affairs. Localization is a subset of globalization and on product level, but I'd like to go more on the business level. Both, localization and globalization, help companies to do business worldwide.

Additionally, I have a certificate in computer programming, and since I have been working in the software and hardware environment, I have been picking up a lot of IT stuff as well. As you know, we all learn on the job for which we do not have a degree to show.

I haven't taken my GMAT yet.

MBA in international affairs sounds wonderful. Is it feasible at my age though? I was thinking about a degree in Business Analysis.

Thank you.
@ezra

Thanks. No worries, I didn't take it the wrong way regarding age. Those jobs that the younger generation is entering aren't the ones I am looking for.

@Elbrus
Many thanks. I have a degree in engineering and translation studies, but I haven't worked as a translator since 2004. I moved to software localization and project management. I have experience in pharmacovigilance and the regulated environment in general as well. As a localization project manager, I am getting too old (which often means expensive). And I have done enough localization projects that I'd like to do something else or do something that is a notch higher. I have always been interested in international politics and affairs. Localization is a subset of globalization and on product level, but I'd like to go more on the business level. Both, localization and globalization, help companies to do business worldwide.

Additionally, I have a certificate in computer programming, and since I have been working in the software and hardware environment, I have been picking up a lot of IT stuff as well. As you know, we all learn on the job for which we do not have a degree to show.

I haven't taken my GMAT yet.

MBA in international affairs sounds wonderful. Is it feasible at my age though? I was thinking about a degree in Business Analysis.

Thank you.
quote
Elbrus
Don't be obsessed with what others think about your age, be obsessed with what you think about it !!
I am 42 and I have asked several unis whether I could fit well in the cohort. They said your age is not a drawback but you must be aware your peers are going to be 10-15 years your younger, the rest is up to you.
There is an MBA in international affairs at the University of Geneve, Switzerland. I met them once at an MBA event. The costs are around 35000 euros, and this MBA may help you hop on an NGO, UN and a number of UN agencies in the city. If you are German, this could be a nice place for you, but you must dig deeper yourself.
Regarding Business Analytics please ask others. I think, such MBAs are aplenty.

[Edited by Elbrus on Aug 07, 2015]

Don't be obsessed with what others think about your age, be obsessed with what you think about it !!
I am 42 and I have asked several unis whether I could fit well in the cohort. They said your age is not a drawback but you must be aware your peers are going to be 10-15 years your younger, the rest is up to you.
There is an MBA in international affairs at the University of Geneve, Switzerland. I met them once at an MBA event. The costs are around 35000 euros, and this MBA may help you hop on an NGO, UN and a number of UN agencies in the city. If you are German, this could be a nice place for you, but you must dig deeper yourself.
Regarding Business Analytics please ask others. I think, such MBAs are aplenty.
quote
@Elbrus

Many thanks.
@Elbrus

Many thanks.
quote

Reply to Post