Female friendly and & unfriendly schools: what the MiM ranking shows


Duncan

The gender gap refuses to improve at many schools. I used today's new MiM ranking to add the percentage of female faculty and students are the ranked schools. The schools with the highest and lowest totals are ranked below. The order of attributes is: School, Female faculty (%), Female students (%)



Highest

School Female faculty (%) Female students (%)

Trinity College Dublin, Trinity Business School 49 66

EM Strasbourg Business School 58 56

St Petersburg University, Graduate School of Management 54 58

Tongji University School of Economics and Management 40 71

University of Ljubljana, School of Economics and Business 51 57

Paris School of Business 52 53

University of Economics, Prague 51 54

Corvinus University of Budapest 40 64

WU (Vienna University of Economics and Business) 41 62

University of British Columbia: Sauder 29 74



Lowest



University of Cologne 21 46

WHU ‚ Otto Beisheim School of Management 30 36

HEC Paris 22 44

Frankfurt School of Finance and Management 19 41

Indian Institute of Management Udaipur 27 29

Indian Institute of Management Calcutta 23 32

Indian Institute of Management Bangalore 18 37

ESMT Berlin 16 38

HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management 27 26

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad 20 24

[Edited by Duncan on Sep 28, 2020]

The gender gap refuses to improve at many schools. I used today's new MiM ranking to add the percentage of female faculty and students are the ranked schools. The schools with the highest and lowest totals are ranked below. The order of attributes is: School, Female faculty (%), Female students (%)<br>
<br>
Highest<br>
School Female faculty (%) Female students (%)<br>
Trinity College Dublin, Trinity Business School 49 66<br>
EM Strasbourg Business School 58 56<br>
St Petersburg University, Graduate School of Management 54 58<br>
Tongji University School of Economics and Management 40 71<br>
University of Ljubljana, School of Economics and Business 51 57<br>
Paris School of Business 52 53<br>
University of Economics, Prague 51 54<br>
Corvinus University of Budapest 40 64<br>
WU (Vienna University of Economics and Business) 41 62<br>
University of British Columbia: Sauder 29 74<br>
<br>
Lowest<br>
<br>
University of Cologne 21 46<br>
WHU ‚ Otto Beisheim School of Management 30 36<br>
HEC Paris 22 44<br>
Frankfurt School of Finance and Management 19 41<br>
Indian Institute of Management Udaipur 27 29<br>
Indian Institute of Management Calcutta 23 32<br>
Indian Institute of Management Bangalore 18 37<br>
ESMT Berlin 16 38<br>
HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management 27 26<br>
Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad 20 24
quote
laurie

So in terms of the lowest, that's the majority of the German schools that are ranked (with the exception of Mannheim), as well as the majority of Indian schools (except SP Jain). 

So in terms of the lowest, that's the majority of the German schools that are ranked (with the exception of Mannheim), as well as the majority of Indian schools (except SP Jain).&nbsp;
quote
aslamo

So in terms of the lowest, that's the majority of the German schools that are ranked (with the exception of Mannheim), as well as the majority of Indian schools (except SP Jain). 


Indian schools I can understand, and I assume it's driven by long standing cultural attitudes towards women like in many Asian cultures. I am surprised about Germany though - any reason why that should be the case compared to other European countries?

[quote]So in terms of the lowest, that's the majority of the German schools that are ranked (with the exception of Mannheim), as well as the majority of Indian schools (except SP Jain).&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Indian schools I can understand, and I assume it's driven by long standing cultural attitudes towards women like in many Asian cultures. I am surprised about Germany though - any reason why that should be the case compared to other European countries?
quote
Duncan

I think those student numbers in Germany reflect the preferences of students from Asia, and their families, since Asians are the major consumer of MiM programmes in western Europe. Also, given the huge gap in price between the state universities and the private business schools I think it's very hard for local students to justify hight fees. On the faculty side, I think they certainly reflect gender bias in doctoral programmes and in the way childcare is supported in Germany, as well as the less family-friendly nature of the private German business schools. 

I think those student numbers in Germany reflect the preferences of students from Asia, and their families, since Asians are the major consumer of MiM programmes in western Europe. Also, given the huge gap in price between the state universities and the private business schools I think it's very hard for local students to justify hight fees. On the faculty side, I think they certainly reflect gender bias in doctoral programmes and in the way childcare is supported in Germany, as well as the less family-friendly nature of the private German business schools.&nbsp;
quote
mba hipste...

Broadly speaking, Germany has been investing in programs that aim to get more women into university orbit and eventually professorships / faculty / research.

The gender balance has shifted somewhat over the past years, but still isn't on par with some other European countries. 

I looked at the listing of faculty at Mannheim Business School and roughly 25% were women. I assume that lines up similarly with other b-schools in the country. 

Broadly speaking, Germany has been investing in programs that aim to get more women into university orbit and eventually professorships / faculty / research.<br><br>The gender balance has shifted somewhat over the past years, but still isn't on par with some other European countries.&nbsp;<br><br>I looked at the listing of faculty at Mannheim Business School and roughly 25% were women. I assume that lines up similarly with other b-schools in the country.&nbsp;
quote
laurie

I looked at the listing of faculty at Mannheim Business School and roughly 25% were women. I assume that lines up similarly with other b-schools in the country. 

That's pretty similar to elsewhere though. For instance look at Haas:

https://haas.berkeley.edu/faculty/

Including visiting professors, out of 290, 67 are female (23%). That's a school in California. 

[quote]I looked at the listing of faculty at Mannheim Business School and roughly 25% were women. I assume that lines up similarly with other b-schools in the country.&nbsp; [/quote]<br>That's pretty similar to elsewhere though. For instance look at Haas:<br><br>https://haas.berkeley.edu/faculty/<br><br>Including visiting professors, out of 290, 67 are female (23%). That's a school in California.&nbsp;
quote
StuartHE

You are somewhat mistaken. Rather than everywhere being rather similar, there are big differences between the schools. That is evidenced by the data in the post that opens this thread. 

You seem to feel that US schools should have more women than the rest of the world. But actually, US schools in the top 100 MBAs have fewer female faculty and students than those outside the USA.

What is often seen is that the percentage of female students is around one third higher than the percentage of female faculty. Another sight of being female friendly is that the school does is improving the percentage of female students, since that is easier to change than the number of female faculty. However, even there some schools stand out as poor performers. In some schools the percentage of female faculty is both low and equal to or higher than than the percentage of female students. The numbers are in the same order below: faulty and then students. 

  Indian
  Institute of Management Calcutta
  India
  23
  11


  University of Georgia: Terry
  US
  30
  16


  Brigham Young University:
  Marriott
  US
  11
  21


  Mannheim Business School
  Germany
  28
  21


  Indian Institute of
  Management Bangalore
  India
  19
  23


  Indian Institute of
  Management Ahmedabad
  India
  21
  23


  Purdue University: Krannert
  US
  22
  24


  University of Notre Dame:
  Mendoza
  US
  23
  24




You are somewhat mistaken. Rather than everywhere being rather similar, there are big differences between the schools. That is evidenced by the data in the post that opens this thread.&nbsp;<br><br>You seem to feel that US schools should have more women than the rest of the world. But actually, US schools in the top 100 MBAs have fewer female faculty and students than those outside the USA.<br><br>What is often seen is that the percentage of female students is around one third higher than the percentage of female faculty. Another sight of being female friendly is that the school does is improving the percentage of female students, since that is easier to change than the number of female faculty. However, even there some schools stand out as poor performers. In some schools the percentage of female faculty is both low and equal to or higher than than the percentage of female students. The numbers are in the same order below: faulty and then students.&nbsp;<br><br><div>&nbsp; Indian
</div><div>&nbsp; Institute of Management Calcutta
</div><div>&nbsp; India
</div><div>&nbsp; 23
</div><div>&nbsp; 11
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; University of Georgia: Terry
</div><div>&nbsp; US
</div><div>&nbsp; 30
</div><div>&nbsp; 16
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; Brigham Young University:
</div><div>&nbsp; Marriott
</div><div>&nbsp; US
</div><div>&nbsp; 11
</div><div>&nbsp; 21
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; Mannheim Business School
</div><div>&nbsp; Germany
</div><div>&nbsp; 28
</div><div>&nbsp; 21
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; Indian Institute of
</div><div>&nbsp; Management Bangalore
</div><div>&nbsp; India
</div><div>&nbsp; 19
</div><div>&nbsp; 23
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; Indian Institute of
</div><div>&nbsp; Management Ahmedabad
</div><div>&nbsp; India
</div><div>&nbsp; 21
</div><div>&nbsp; 23
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; Purdue University: Krannert
</div><div>&nbsp; US
</div><div>&nbsp; 22
</div><div>&nbsp; 24
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>&nbsp; University of Notre Dame:
</div><div>&nbsp; Mendoza
</div><div>&nbsp; US
</div><div>&nbsp; 23
</div><div>&nbsp; 24
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div>
</div><div><br></div>
quote
mba hipste...

You seem to feel that US schools should have more women than the rest of the world. But actually, US schools in the top 100 MBAs have fewer female faculty and students than those outside the USA.

Interesting, I wouldn't have thought that. 

[quote]You seem to feel that US schools should have more women than the rest of the world. But actually, US schools in the top 100 MBAs have fewer female faculty and students than those outside the USA.[/quote]<br>Interesting, I wouldn't have thought that.&nbsp;
quote

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