European MBA to radically alter your life?


Alantris
Hello,

I'm new here. I stumbled across this forum and found some of the most no-BS advice here compared to other MBA forums. I'd like to share my story and am hoping the good folks here can advice me how practical my plan is or if it is just folly. So here goes:

Me: Indian. Male. 29. Originally from New Delhi, presently in Canada. I'm a permanent Canadian resident and can apply to be a Canadian citizen in a few months.

Work: I've experience in event management, advertising and Marketing. Handled all advertising for a big liquor brand in India, which was a client of the advertising company I worked for. Presently running my own advertising and marketing firm in Canada.

GMAT: I attempted GMAT once and got a 620. Presently preparing again and I'm certain I'd breach 660.

My goal: To move to a different place and work there. I'd like to move to and live and work either in Italy, the States or Spain. In that order of preference. I'm hoping an MBA would help me in making the professional, geographic and personal transition that I'm looking for. Also, I want to do a 1-year MBA and as I want to get it done quickly and don't want to put my life on hold for 2 years.

I do not wish to stay in Canada or return to India and for this reason, I'm not even looking into Canadian schools.

Post MBA, I'd like to start my own business or get into Brand Management or Marketing.

Languages: Besides my 2 native Indian languages, I'm extremely fluent in English and speak and write native level English. Among my various work roles, I'm also a copywriter. As of now, I don't speak or know any Italian or Spanish.

Schools: I'm hoping to get an admit to a good business school in Italy or Spain. So far the schools I have shortlisted are SDA Bocconi, ESADE and IE. I'm also considering US schools but no decent US school has an MBA of less than 2 years' duration.

My plan: I'm hoping that after getting an MBA from one of the above-mentioned schools, I'd be able to find a decent job and be able to permanently live in either Italy, Spain or the States.

Now this is where I'm looking for some help, advice and wisdom. Firstly, is my plan practical or is it just folly?

Secondly, what are my chances of finding a job in Italy or Spain post MBA given that I don't speak the local language? I'm willing to the learn the language and generally tend to be good at picking up new languages, although of course, being in fluent in a new language is a whole another game.

Some of these European schools have exchange programs with schools in the US. Would that help me finding employment in the States in any way?

If somebody has knowledge about these schools, how likely is it for a graduate from these schools who is non-EU and doesn't speak the local language to find a worthy job post MBA?

Is what I'm planning even doable? Or get me the thing that I seek? Or are there any tweaks I should make in my plan to achieve what I'm after?

Again, I felt the members on this forum offered some of the most realistic advice among all MBA forums and would appreciate if the good folks here could share their thoughts, experiences and advice.

Thank you...

[Edited by Alantris on Jul 07, 2015]

Hello,

I'm new here. I stumbled across this forum and found some of the most no-BS advice here compared to other MBA forums. I'd like to share my story and am hoping the good folks here can advice me how practical my plan is or if it is just folly. So here goes:

Me: Indian. Male. 29. Originally from New Delhi, presently in Canada. I'm a permanent Canadian resident and can apply to be a Canadian citizen in a few months.

Work: I've experience in event management, advertising and Marketing. Handled all advertising for a big liquor brand in India, which was a client of the advertising company I worked for. Presently running my own advertising and marketing firm in Canada.

GMAT: I attempted GMAT once and got a 620. Presently preparing again and I'm certain I'd breach 660.

My goal: To move to a different place and work there. I'd like to move to and live and work either in Italy, the States or Spain. In that order of preference. I'm hoping an MBA would help me in making the professional, geographic and personal transition that I'm looking for. Also, I want to do a 1-year MBA and as I want to get it done quickly and don't want to put my life on hold for 2 years.

I do not wish to stay in Canada or return to India and for this reason, I'm not even looking into Canadian schools.

Post MBA, I'd like to start my own business or get into Brand Management or Marketing.

Languages: Besides my 2 native Indian languages, I'm extremely fluent in English and speak and write native level English. Among my various work roles, I'm also a copywriter. As of now, I don't speak or know any Italian or Spanish.

Schools: I'm hoping to get an admit to a good business school in Italy or Spain. So far the schools I have shortlisted are SDA Bocconi, ESADE and IE. I'm also considering US schools but no decent US school has an MBA of less than 2 years' duration.

My plan: I'm hoping that after getting an MBA from one of the above-mentioned schools, I'd be able to find a decent job and be able to permanently live in either Italy, Spain or the States.

Now this is where I'm looking for some help, advice and wisdom. Firstly, is my plan practical or is it just folly?

Secondly, what are my chances of finding a job in Italy or Spain post MBA given that I don't speak the local language? I'm willing to the learn the language and generally tend to be good at picking up new languages, although of course, being in fluent in a new language is a whole another game.

Some of these European schools have exchange programs with schools in the US. Would that help me finding employment in the States in any way?

If somebody has knowledge about these schools, how likely is it for a graduate from these schools who is non-EU and doesn't speak the local language to find a worthy job post MBA?

Is what I'm planning even doable? Or get me the thing that I seek? Or are there any tweaks I should make in my plan to achieve what I'm after?

Again, I felt the members on this forum offered some of the most realistic advice among all MBA forums and would appreciate if the good folks here could share their thoughts, experiences and advice.

Thank you...
quote
Duncan
To do this you need commitment. The fact that you are talking about work in the US, and that you are not learning a language, makes me think you lack it right now.
To do this you need commitment. The fact that you are talking about work in the US, and that you are not learning a language, makes me think you lack it right now.
quote
Alantris
Thanks for your swift reply Duncan. I see how the fact that I'm not learning a language can come across as a lack of commitment. However, before committing to something, I'm trying to find out if it's even practical given the downturn in the European economy.

As of now, I'm not 100% certain I'll get an admit in Bocconi or Esade or IE or none. Learning a language would help, sure, but if I start learning Italian and end up in Spain, that'd be worth nothing then. And learning a language is putting in hours and effort, not so worried about the effort but then time is money. If I end up up in Italy after learning Spanish or vice versa, the time spent learning the language could have been used doing something else worthwhile, perhaps even earning money for school.

What I'm trying to find out is if it'd be worth doing. Given that I'm not from EU and the European economy, if it'd be possible to achieve gainful and worthwhile employment post graduation from the above said schools. Also, whether I stand a chance to get an admit to one of these schools or not.

Working in the US is plan B, again given the rumors of a lack of employment opportunities in Europe for non-EU students.

Thank you.
Thanks for your swift reply Duncan. I see how the fact that I'm not learning a language can come across as a lack of commitment. However, before committing to something, I'm trying to find out if it's even practical given the downturn in the European economy.

As of now, I'm not 100% certain I'll get an admit in Bocconi or Esade or IE or none. Learning a language would help, sure, but if I start learning Italian and end up in Spain, that'd be worth nothing then. And learning a language is putting in hours and effort, not so worried about the effort but then time is money. If I end up up in Italy after learning Spanish or vice versa, the time spent learning the language could have been used doing something else worthwhile, perhaps even earning money for school.

What I'm trying to find out is if it'd be worth doing. Given that I'm not from EU and the European economy, if it'd be possible to achieve gainful and worthwhile employment post graduation from the above said schools. Also, whether I stand a chance to get an admit to one of these schools or not.

Working in the US is plan B, again given the rumors of a lack of employment opportunities in Europe for non-EU students.

Thank you.
quote
Duncan
So, no it's not worth doing if you don't speak the language before starting the program. Without business level language skills, something that the MBA will not give you, it would be pointless. My feeling is that Bocconi and the French schools will be a better fit for you than the Spanish schools, which looks more to Latin America.
So, no it's not worth doing if you don't speak the language before starting the program. Without business level language skills, something that the MBA will not give you, it would be pointless. My feeling is that Bocconi and the French schools will be a better fit for you than the Spanish schools, which looks more to Latin America.
quote
Hello,

I'm new here. I stumbled across this forum and found some of the most no-BS advice here compared to other MBA forums. I'd like to share my story and am hoping the good folks here can advice me how practical my plan is or if it is just folly. So here goes:

Me: Indian. Male. 29. Originally from New Delhi, presently in Canada. I'm a permanent Canadian resident and can apply to be a Canadian citizen in a few months.

Work: I've experience in event management, advertising and Marketing. Handled all advertising for a big liquor brand in India, which was a client of the advertising company I worked for. Presently running my own advertising and marketing firm in Canada.

GMAT: I attempted GMAT once and got a 620. Presently preparing again and I'm certain I'd breach 660.

My goal: To move to a different place and work there. I'd like to move to and live and work either in Italy, the States or Spain. In that order of preference. I'm hoping an MBA would help me in making the professional, geographic and personal transition that I'm looking for. Also, I want to do a 1-year MBA and as I want to get it done quickly and don't want to put my life on hold for 2 years.

I do not wish to stay in Canada or return to India and for this reason, I'm not even looking into Canadian schools.

Post MBA, I'd like to start my own business or get into Brand Management or Marketing.

Languages: Besides my 2 native Indian languages, I'm extremely fluent in English and speak and write native level English. Among my various work roles, I'm also a copywriter. As of now, I don't speak or know any Italian or Spanish.

Schools: I'm hoping to get an admit to a good business school in Italy or Spain. So far the schools I have shortlisted are SDA Bocconi, ESADE and IE. I'm also considering US schools but no decent US school has an MBA of less than 2 years' duration.

My plan: I'm hoping that after getting an MBA from one of the above-mentioned schools, I'd be able to find a decent job and be able to permanently live in either Italy, Spain or the States.

Now this is where I'm looking for some help, advice and wisdom. Firstly, is my plan practical or is it just folly?

Secondly, what are my chances of finding a job in Italy or Spain post MBA given that I don't speak the local language? I'm willing to the learn the language and generally tend to be good at picking up new languages, although of course, being in fluent in a new language is a whole another game.

Some of these European schools have exchange programs with schools in the US. Would that help me finding employment in the States in any way?

If somebody has knowledge about these schools, how likely is it for a graduate from these schools who is non-EU and doesn't speak the local language to find a worthy job post MBA?

Is what I'm planning even doable? Or get me the thing that I seek? Or are there any tweaks I should make in my plan to achieve what I'm after?

Again, I felt the members on this forum offered some of the most realistic advice among all MBA forums and would appreciate if the good folks here could share their thoughts, experiences and advice.

Thank you...
[quote]Hello,

I'm new here. I stumbled across this forum and found some of the most no-BS advice here compared to other MBA forums. I'd like to share my story and am hoping the good folks here can advice me how practical my plan is or if it is just folly. So here goes:

Me: Indian. Male. 29. Originally from New Delhi, presently in Canada. I'm a permanent Canadian resident and can apply to be a Canadian citizen in a few months.

Work: I've experience in event management, advertising and Marketing. Handled all advertising for a big liquor brand in India, which was a client of the advertising company I worked for. Presently running my own advertising and marketing firm in Canada.

GMAT: I attempted GMAT once and got a 620. Presently preparing again and I'm certain I'd breach 660.

My goal: To move to a different place and work there. I'd like to move to and live and work either in Italy, the States or Spain. In that order of preference. I'm hoping an MBA would help me in making the professional, geographic and personal transition that I'm looking for. Also, I want to do a 1-year MBA and as I want to get it done quickly and don't want to put my life on hold for 2 years.

I do not wish to stay in Canada or return to India and for this reason, I'm not even looking into Canadian schools.

Post MBA, I'd like to start my own business or get into Brand Management or Marketing.

Languages: Besides my 2 native Indian languages, I'm extremely fluent in English and speak and write native level English. Among my various work roles, I'm also a copywriter. As of now, I don't speak or know any Italian or Spanish.

Schools: I'm hoping to get an admit to a good business school in Italy or Spain. So far the schools I have shortlisted are SDA Bocconi, ESADE and IE. I'm also considering US schools but no decent US school has an MBA of less than 2 years' duration.

My plan: I'm hoping that after getting an MBA from one of the above-mentioned schools, I'd be able to find a decent job and be able to permanently live in either Italy, Spain or the States.

Now this is where I'm looking for some help, advice and wisdom. Firstly, is my plan practical or is it just folly?

Secondly, what are my chances of finding a job in Italy or Spain post MBA given that I don't speak the local language? I'm willing to the learn the language and generally tend to be good at picking up new languages, although of course, being in fluent in a new language is a whole another game.

Some of these European schools have exchange programs with schools in the US. Would that help me finding employment in the States in any way?

If somebody has knowledge about these schools, how likely is it for a graduate from these schools who is non-EU and doesn't speak the local language to find a worthy job post MBA?

Is what I'm planning even doable? Or get me the thing that I seek? Or are there any tweaks I should make in my plan to achieve what I'm after?

Again, I felt the members on this forum offered some of the most realistic advice among all MBA forums and would appreciate if the good folks here could share their thoughts, experiences and advice.

Thank you...[/quote]
quote
Hi,

It's not mentioned in your post, about your undergraduate major.

If you are really fed up with the extreme cold of Canada and the prevailing indifference in the job market towards the first generation immigrants there, instead of trying to move to enjoy some sunlight in Italy or Spain, it's a good idea to try to gain employment in US as you are going to have Canadian citizenship soon. You can do part time/flexible MBAs in US while you work.

[Edited by distance learner on Jul 08, 2015]

Hi,

It's not mentioned in your post, about your undergraduate major.

If you are really fed up with the extreme cold of Canada and the prevailing indifference in the job market towards the first generation immigrants there, instead of trying to move to enjoy some sunlight in Italy or Spain, it's a good idea to try to gain employment in US as you are going to have Canadian citizenship soon. You can do part time/flexible MBAs in US while you work.
quote
Mamit
I believe US is certainly a better option considering the language barrier in most European countries. However, I would recommend that you opt for a 2 years program if opting for US.
I believe US is certainly a better option considering the language barrier in most European countries. However, I would recommend that you opt for a 2 years program if opting for US.
quote
Alantris
@Duncan: Thank you for clearing that up. I guess that helps narrow my focus and I can look to studying the language and try and see how it'd (or not) work for me.

@Distance learner: You hit the nail on the head. And you bring up an interesting option which clearly makes sense.

@Mamit: Thank you for your advice. Could you please elucidate why a 2-year program would make more sense for US? Thanks,

I have a bachelor's degree in Commerce, from University of Delhi. While the option outlined by Distance Learner makes sense, there's a hurdle that I face when considering US (or even Canadian) schools.

Most US schools require a 4-year bachelor's degree for admission to MBA programs, while unfortunately, my degree is a 3-year bachelor's. That automatically renders me ineligible to apply for most MBA programs in the States.

Also, due to some personal reasons, I wish to live and work in the State of California only and therefore, it'd make sense to do an MBA from a California based school.

In my (amateurish) research efforts, I haven't been able to find a a decent California based program that accepts 3-year degrees. I'd greatly appreciate if someone could point me towards some good MBA programs that accept a 3-year degree.

As always, thank you for taking out the time to respond to my queries and helping me chart the course ahead.
@Duncan: Thank you for clearing that up. I guess that helps narrow my focus and I can look to studying the language and try and see how it'd (or not) work for me.

@Distance learner: You hit the nail on the head. And you bring up an interesting option which clearly makes sense.

@Mamit: Thank you for your advice. Could you please elucidate why a 2-year program would make more sense for US? Thanks,

I have a bachelor's degree in Commerce, from University of Delhi. While the option outlined by Distance Learner makes sense, there's a hurdle that I face when considering US (or even Canadian) schools.

Most US schools require a 4-year bachelor's degree for admission to MBA programs, while unfortunately, my degree is a 3-year bachelor's. That automatically renders me ineligible to apply for most MBA programs in the States.

Also, due to some personal reasons, I wish to live and work in the State of California only and therefore, it'd make sense to do an MBA from a California based school.

In my (amateurish) research efforts, I haven't been able to find a a decent California based program that accepts 3-year degrees. I'd greatly appreciate if someone could point me towards some good MBA programs that accept a 3-year degree.

As always, thank you for taking out the time to respond to my queries and helping me chart the course ahead.
quote
Why don't you think of doing a Masters in Finance from Canada(or from US), get good grades and then apply for an MBA of your choice?
Why don't you think of doing a Masters in Finance from Canada(or from US), get good grades and then apply for an MBA of your choice?
quote
Alantris
Hi again Distance Learner,

Thanks for the reply. I contemplated going down that route too. I wasn't too keen on it as it adds another year in school, (one of the reason's I wanted to do a 1-year MBA).

But primarily because I checked with the universities in Canada and I was told I was ineligible for their other master's programs too as they require a 4-year bachelor's degree. I didn't check with American Univs at that time but I'll check and try to explore that option.

Thank you.
Hi again Distance Learner,

Thanks for the reply. I contemplated going down that route too. I wasn't too keen on it as it adds another year in school, (one of the reason's I wanted to do a 1-year MBA).

But primarily because I checked with the universities in Canada and I was told I was ineligible for their other master's programs too as they require a 4-year bachelor's degree. I didn't check with American Univs at that time but I'll check and try to explore that option.

Thank you.
quote
mba hipste...
Most US schools require a 4-year bachelor's degree for admission to MBA programs, while unfortunately, my degree is a 3-year bachelor's. That automatically renders me ineligible to apply for most MBA programs in the States.

That's not true. Many business schools will accept a 3-year bachelor's, and I'd wager that most will have a lot of flexibility for international students with strong profiles. For instance:

From Columbia:
We accept applications from candidates with a three-year undergraduate degree. Those applications are reviewed on a case-by-case basis.


From UCLA:
International applicants with just a 3-year undergraduate degree may be admitted if the Admissions Committee determines that their entire academic profile and overall application are strong enough.


From Yale:
International applicants with a three-year degree from an accredited institution may apply. Typically, successful applicants whose degree was earned in fewer than 16 total years of education have completed an additional master's degree as well, although it is not required.


Darden:
It is expected that all applicants to Darden will have either completed their bachelor's degree at a college or university in the United States or hold a college or university degree equivalent to a four-year American baccalaureate degree. Darden will also recognize undergraduate degrees that were earned in only three years of study.


I'd suggest that if you were interested in particular schools, to ask them. There's a lot of leeway here.
[quote]Most US schools require a 4-year bachelor's degree for admission to MBA programs, while unfortunately, my degree is a 3-year bachelor's. That automatically renders me ineligible to apply for most MBA programs in the States. [/quote]
That's not true. Many business schools will accept a 3-year bachelor's, and I'd wager that most will have a lot of flexibility for international students with strong profiles. For instance:

From Columbia:
[quote]We accept applications from candidates with a three-year undergraduate degree. Those applications are reviewed on a case-by-case basis.[/quote]

From UCLA:
[quote]International applicants with just a 3-year undergraduate degree may be admitted if the Admissions Committee determines that their entire academic profile and overall application are strong enough.[/quote]

From Yale:
[quote]International applicants with a three-year degree from an accredited institution may apply. Typically, successful applicants whose degree was earned in fewer than 16 total years of education have completed an additional master's degree as well, although it is not required.[/quote]

Darden:
[quote]It is expected that all applicants to Darden will have either completed their bachelor's degree at a college or university in the United States or hold a college or university degree equivalent to a four-year American baccalaureate degree. Darden will also recognize undergraduate degrees that were earned in only three years of study.[/quote]

I'd suggest that if you were interested in particular schools, to ask them. There's a lot of leeway here.
quote
Hey, just jumping in here: how likely is it to land a job in Europe, without speaking the local language, if you do your MBA in a city where there are a lot of English speakers? I'm thinking of Copenhagen Business School and ESMT, for instance.
Hey, just jumping in here: how likely is it to land a job in Europe, without speaking the local language, if you do your MBA in a city where there are a lot of English speakers? I'm thinking of Copenhagen Business School and ESMT, for instance.
quote
Duncan
Not very. See Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713
Not very. See Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713
quote
mba hipste...
Hey, just jumping in here: how likely is it to land a job in Europe, without speaking the local language, if you do your MBA in a city where there are a lot of English speakers? I'm thinking of Copenhagen Business School and ESMT, for instance.

It's not just about who speaks which language in a city, it's about what language business is done in. And it's predominantly done in the language of the country you're in. The exceptions are, perhaps, international-facing organizations and many startups. I could see English-speaking MBAs fill positions in one of Copenhagen's NGOs for instance, or launch a startup in Berlin. However, these kinds of jobs are not the norm for MBAs.
[quote]Hey, just jumping in here: how likely is it to land a job in Europe, without speaking the local language, if you do your MBA in a city where there are a lot of English speakers? I'm thinking of Copenhagen Business School and ESMT, for instance.[/quote]
It's not just about who speaks which language in a city, it's about what language business is done in. And it's predominantly done in the language of the country you're in. The exceptions are, perhaps, international-facing organizations and many startups. I could see English-speaking MBAs fill positions in one of Copenhagen's NGOs for instance, or launch a startup in Berlin. However, these kinds of jobs are not the norm for MBAs.
quote
Duncan
CBS has very low placement for international students who don't speak Danish. And how can Berlin start-ups afford MBAs?
CBS has very low placement for international students who don't speak Danish. And how can Berlin start-ups afford MBAs?
quote
Ayon
My friend (Indian citizen) graduated from CBS. What he told me is that although English is spoken frequently in Copenhagen, they prefer someone with ability to speak Danish and at maybe one other European language.
There are several equally qualified students / people in the area who can speak fluent English, Danish and German.


My friend was able to land few interviews, but none worked out. While he was studying in CBS, his wife was working in Stockholm, so she was able to support him for several months before he eventually found a job in Stockholm.

You may get a job despite the language barrier but it may take upto 6-12 months after graduation.
My friend (Indian citizen) graduated from CBS. What he told me is that although English is spoken frequently in Copenhagen, they prefer someone with ability to speak Danish and at maybe one other European language.
There are several equally qualified students / people in the area who can speak fluent English, Danish and German.


My friend was able to land few interviews, but none worked out. While he was studying in CBS, his wife was working in Stockholm, so she was able to support him for several months before he eventually found a job in Stockholm.

You may get a job despite the language barrier but it may take upto 6-12 months after graduation.
quote
mba hipste...
CBS has very low placement for international students who don't speak Danish. And how can Berlin start-ups afford MBAs?

Agreed. As I said, these aren't the norm. And maybe "startup ecosystem" might have been a more appropriate term - ESMT puts grads into Rocket Internet, for instance. Plus, the larger companies in the ecosystem - your Soundclouds, Woogas, etc., take on MBAs regularly. Not nearly as many as in other industries, but it does happen.
[quote]CBS has very low placement for international students who don't speak Danish. And how can Berlin start-ups afford MBAs? [/quote]
Agreed. As I said, these aren't the norm. And maybe "startup ecosystem" might have been a more appropriate term - ESMT puts grads into Rocket Internet, for instance. Plus, the larger companies in the ecosystem - your Soundclouds, Woogas, etc., take on MBAs regularly. Not nearly as many as in other industries, but it does happen.
quote
Duncan
Well, for MBAs who have taken loans the pay of startups can be challenging.
Well, for MBAs who have taken loans the pay of startups can be challenging.
quote
I agree with Duncan however I think things are changing.
I have acceptance from cbs and esmt both. Alumni have given a good reason for knowing and not knowing the language. But surely language helps. Esmt is a fresh college but cbs is old and strong in nordics so it's a confusing situation.
I agree with Duncan however I think things are changing.
I have acceptance from cbs and esmt both. Alumni have given a good reason for knowing and not knowing the language. But surely language helps. Esmt is a fresh college but cbs is old and strong in nordics so it's a confusing situation.
quote
Duncan
I made a similar point about Germany on another post yesterday:- http://find-mba.com/board/europe/st-gallen-vs-esmt-42993 "The weak market for English-speaking MBAs in German is not a subjective weakness of the business schools which will erode after time. It is an objective reality of the German-speaking region that the language of business is German. Overwhelmingly, students who find work in these programmes will speak German, and will be either German or will come from (and return to) companies or countries that have a major trading partner in the German-speaking region. " The same is true of Denmark.

Actually the placement data for CBS are pretty clear. They have been discussed on this site before. Placement for non-Danish MBAs at CBS is less and less, with each successive year, in Denmark. That's not because of the cuts at CBS, although they have an effect, but because of the objective reality that people need to know the culture and the language to succeed as general managers.

There is no disadvantage to learning the language, and the in-country placement outcomes are totally different. I don't see what is confusing when LinkedIn and placement reports allow you so easily to triangulate the outcomes.
I made a similar point about Germany on another post yesterday:- http://find-mba.com/board/europe/st-gallen-vs-esmt-42993 "The weak market for English-speaking MBAs in German is not a subjective weakness of the business schools which will erode after time. It is an objective reality of the German-speaking region that the language of business is German. Overwhelmingly, students who find work in these programmes will speak German, and will be either German or will come from (and return to) companies or countries that have a major trading partner in the German-speaking region. " The same is true of Denmark.

Actually the placement data for CBS are pretty clear. They have been discussed on this site before. Placement for non-Danish MBAs at CBS is less and less, with each successive year, in Denmark. That's not because of the cuts at CBS, although they have an effect, but because of the objective reality that people need to know the culture and the language to succeed as general managers.

There is no disadvantage to learning the language, and the in-country placement outcomes are totally different. I don't see what is confusing when LinkedIn and placement reports allow you so easily to triangulate the outcomes.
quote

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