Job in USA for non-americans, after MBA


gaucho
Hello Guys,
I need your advice! I come from a PhD and 3 years' experience in market access consultancy for pharmaceuticals.
Do you have any idea how hard it is to get a job in (say) California after doing an MBA?
Is it worth choosing schools only in California so as to have a better chance of getting a job there?
Any good advice will be really appreciated!!
Best wishes
Hello Guys,
I need your advice! I come from a PhD and 3 years' experience in market access consultancy for pharmaceuticals.
Do you have any idea how hard it is to get a job in (say) California after doing an MBA?
Is it worth choosing schools only in California so as to have a better chance of getting a job there?
Any good advice will be really appreciated!!
Best wishes
quote
Duncan
It's very hard: harder to find work, and harder to find work in the US. UCLA is a good example, since they publish a detailed employment report: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/EmploymentReport.pdf

33% are international students (8% are Permanent Residents, 25% have come to the US for the MBA). 69% of the students have job offers and are US/PR. 21% have job offers and are not US/PR. 69/75 is a 92% offer rate for US/PR students and 21/25 is an 84% offer rate for non-US/PR students. 87% find work in the US and 13% find work outside the US. That suggests that around half of the non-US and non-PR students find work in the US, and the others return home (their mean salary is 92K, compared to 105K in the US).
It's very hard: harder to find work, and harder to find work in the US. UCLA is a good example, since they publish a detailed employment report: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/EmploymentReport.pdf

33% are international students (8% are Permanent Residents, 25% have come to the US for the MBA). 69% of the students have job offers and are US/PR. 21% have job offers and are not US/PR. 69/75 is a 92% offer rate for US/PR students and 21/25 is an 84% offer rate for non-US/PR students. 87% find work in the US and 13% find work outside the US. That suggests that around half of the non-US and non-PR students find work in the US, and the others return home (their mean salary is 92K, compared to 105K in the US).
quote
gaucho
Thank you JK! It's an interesting report. 65/69 (94%) of the non US/PR who answered the survey and sought employment accepted job offers at some point. The reports states that 54% of the jobs accepted by non-US/PR were in the US, but it does how many initially sought employment there...
Thank you JK! It's an interesting report. 65/69 (94%) of the non US/PR who answered the survey and sought employment accepted job offers at some point. The reports states that 54% of the jobs accepted by non-US/PR were in the US, but it does how many initially sought employment there...
quote
Duncan
No, the report says that 54% of international students were in the US, but that includes those with PR. Out of the total 100% of students, 33% are international students, and (54%*33%) 18% are international students who will work in the US. However 8% of the class have PR, and it's reasonable to assume that they will continue to work in the US, leaving the other 10% as international students without PR who work in the US. Therefore it's safe to assume that of the 25% which are international students without PR, (10%/25%) 40% get jobs in the US, and the rest do not.

PS I think it's reasonable to assume that most of the students will be looking for work in the US, even if only for a few years. Otherwise, why lose out on extending your network in the region where you want to work?
No, the report says that 54% of international students were in the US, but that includes those with PR. Out of the total 100% of students, 33% are international students, and (54%*33%) 18% are international students who will work in the US. However 8% of the class have PR, and it's reasonable to assume that they will continue to work in the US, leaving the other 10% as international students without PR who work in the US. Therefore it's safe to assume that of the 25% which are international students without PR, (10%/25%) 40% get jobs in the US, and the rest do not.

PS I think it's reasonable to assume that most of the students will be looking for work in the US, even if only for a few years. Otherwise, why lose out on extending your network in the region where you want to work?
quote
ezra
PS I think it's reasonable to assume that most of the students will be looking for work in the US, even if only for a few years. Otherwise, why loose out on extending your network in the region where you want to work?

Maybe. But this could also be based on a simple rational economic decision.

I was looking at the most recent Haas employment reports (c/o 2011): the class was made up of about 30% international students, and just under 20% of the whole class ended up working internationally. What's striking about the report was that the average salary of those working internationally was actually larger than that of those working domestically (not much larger, mind you.)

Maybe students ended up returning to their home countries because they could make more there than they could in the US?
<blockquote>PS I think it's reasonable to assume that most of the students will be looking for work in the US, even if only for a few years. Otherwise, why loose out on extending your network in the region where you want to work?</blockquote>
Maybe. But this could also be based on a simple rational economic decision.

I was looking at the most recent Haas employment reports (c/o 2011): the class was made up of about 30% international students, and just under 20% of the whole class ended up working internationally. What's striking about the report was that the average salary of those working internationally was actually larger than that of those working domestically (not much larger, mind you.)

Maybe students ended up returning to their home countries because they could make more there than they could in the US?
quote
Duncan
Interesting. The 2011 report is at http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/11_12Stats.html#NINE and, actually, the median salary and bonus are both higher in the US than abroad. It looks like a small number of higher salaries in Latin America have pushed up the mean there to $128K - but the median is $115k (plus $35 bonus) in the US versus $110k (plus $32k) elsewhere. Still very good compensation.
Interesting. The 2011 report is at http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/11_12Stats.html#NINE and, actually, the median salary and bonus are both higher in the US than abroad. It looks like a small number of higher salaries in Latin America have pushed up the mean there to $128K - but the median is $115k (plus $35 bonus) in the US versus $110k (plus $32k) elsewhere. Still very good compensation.
quote
ezra
It's too bad they don't list average salaries by city. But I'd guess that there are a few places where salaries are much higher than other places in the region, and these are driving up the mean: like Sao Paolo or Santiago in Latin America or Tokyo in Asia.
It's too bad they don't list average salaries by city. But I'd guess that there are a few places where salaries are much higher than other places in the region, and these are driving up the mean: like Sao Paolo or Santiago in Latin America or Tokyo in Asia.
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MB
The probability of landing a job in US is highly correlated with the quality (ranking) of the MBA program you attend in US. Recruiters that are sponsoring H1B visas are searching for talent in the top 30 MBA Programs. If your GMAT / TOEFL and application convinces the school that you are a high potential candidate they will grant you admission.
The probability of landing a job in US is highly correlated with the quality (ranking) of the MBA program you attend in US. Recruiters that are sponsoring H1B visas are searching for talent in the top 30 MBA Programs. If your GMAT / TOEFL and application convinces the school that you are a high potential candidate they will grant you admission.
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hello MB, as you said, the employers willing to sponsor H1B recruit at top 30 schools. Do you have any data regarding whether they do get H1B visas or not as the H1B are capped at 65000 only
hello MB, as you said, the employers willing to sponsor H1B recruit at top 30 schools. Do you have any data regarding whether they do get H1B visas or not as the H1B are capped at 65000 only
quote
Hello Guys,

I finish MBA in Europe and I want to work in USA. I was in USA last year and I want to live there. Any town, any state. Also I am ready to work for very low salary just to move away from Europe. Can you help me where I can find employer who need MBA worker for less money then usual? Thx.

P.S. if somebody wants to help feel free to contact me on email.
Hello Guys,

I finish MBA in Europe and I want to work in USA. I was in USA last year and I want to live there. Any town, any state. Also I am ready to work for very low salary just to move away from Europe. Can you help me where I can find employer who need MBA worker for less money then usual? Thx.

P.S. if somebody wants to help feel free to contact me on email.
quote
Duncan
Unless you have residency in the USA, I don't see how that is possible. Try marrying an American.
Unless you have residency in the USA, I don't see how that is possible. Try marrying an American.
quote
Razors Edg...
An MBA from what school? With an MBA from a top tier school like say London Business School, that would help. If so, leverage those networks and career services.

However, the odds are still against you: securing a work visa is not very easy, and a much better options would be to study in the USA so you can get a post-study work visa as a way to transition.
An MBA from what school? With an MBA from a top tier school like say London Business School, that would help. If so, leverage those networks and career services.

However, the odds are still against you: securing a work visa is not very easy, and a much better options would be to study in the USA so you can get a post-study work visa as a way to transition.
quote

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