Is an MBA Program a good choice for me?!


galeona
Two years ago I graduated with a Bachelor degree in Business Administration - concentration marketing.
Untill few months ago I was convinced I want to apply for an MBA, but after a conversation with my current boss I'm not sure anymore if that's my best choice.

Basically I already have a Business Administration degree and I know a little bit of everything (marketing, accounting, finance, economics), but I'm not a real specilist in anything.
So according to my boss, if I continue with an MBA I will learn a lot of usefull skills and things, but still I won't have "a real" profession. Even if I do a concentration in Marketing I won't be as good as someone with MS in Marketing and Advertising.

I would be really thankful if you give me your opinion on that matter. I'm 25, with almost 2 years of post grad working experience, and currently I don't know whether my best choice is to persue MBA degree or to try and specialize in something more particular like MS in Marketing and Advertisment?
Two years ago I graduated with a Bachelor degree in Business Administration - concentration marketing.
Untill few months ago I was convinced I want to apply for an MBA, but after a conversation with my current boss I'm not sure anymore if that's my best choice.

Basically I already have a Business Administration degree and I know a little bit of everything (marketing, accounting, finance, economics), but I'm not a real specilist in anything.
So according to my boss, if I continue with an MBA I will learn a lot of usefull skills and things, but still I won't have "a real" profession. Even if I do a concentration in Marketing I won't be as good as someone with MS in Marketing and Advertising.

I would be really thankful if you give me your opinion on that matter. I'm 25, with almost 2 years of post grad working experience, and currently I don't know whether my best choice is to persue MBA degree or to try and specialize in something more particular like MS in Marketing and Advertisment?
quote
Duncan
It sounds like you need to identify your long-term goals. Your boss is probably mistaken about what an MBA would do, especially if you went to a top MBA school It would not just give you knowledge, it would transform your leadership, teamworking and decision-making skills.

Many MBA programmes include a specialisation in the second half which would be similar to, or better than, an MS in marketing. Your classmates would be much better, and employers will take you more seriously (assuming, of course, that the prestige of the university is the same).
It sounds like you need to identify your long-term goals. Your boss is probably mistaken about what an MBA would do, especially if you went to a top MBA school It would not just give you knowledge, it would transform your leadership, teamworking and decision-making skills.

Many MBA programmes include a specialisation in the second half which would be similar to, or better than, an MS in marketing. Your classmates would be much better, and employers will take you more seriously (assuming, of course, that the prestige of the university is the same).
quote
ezra
I'd agree with Duncan that you need to identify your goals. Here are some things that you should think about:

Yes, an MBA is, in a way, a general program. However, it is a general "management" program, in that you develop high-capacity skills such as leadership and teambuilding - skills that you may not be able to develop in the workplace.

I guess you can start by looking at your job and ask yourself if you can get into a management position in the career trajectory you're on. If so, great - stay the course. If you can't see that happening, then maybe an MBA is right for you.

Depending on where you are, there might be a way to find a part-time program that you can do without leaving your current job. If so, your company might help you fund it. I'm not sure about your location, but if you're in LA, Pepperdine has a decent program; as does UCLA. There are tons in NYC - Rutgers and CUNY off the top of my head.

Otherwise, there are distance learning MBAs that you can do, often at your own pace. You can check out the programs at ASU Carey, UNC Kenan-Flagler, and Indiana University/Kelley to start out with.

Two years ago I graduated with a Bachelor degree in Business Administration - concentration marketing.
Untill few months ago I was convinced I want to apply for an MBA, but after a conversation with my current boss I'm not sure anymore if that's my best choice.

Basically I already have a Business Administration degree and I know a little bit of everything (marketing, accounting, finance, economics), but I'm not a real specilist in anything.
So according to my boss, if I continue with an MBA I will learn a lot of usefull skills and things, but still I won't have "a real" profession. Even if I do a concentration in Marketing I won't be as good as someone with MS in Marketing and Advertising.

I would be really thankful if you give me your opinion on that matter. I'm 25, with almost 2 years of post grad working experience, and currently I don't know whether my best choice is to persue MBA degree or to try and specialize in something more particular like MS in Marketing and Advertisment?
I'd agree with Duncan that you need to identify your goals. Here are some things that you should think about:

Yes, an MBA is, in a way, a general program. However, it is a general "management" program, in that you develop high-capacity skills such as leadership and teambuilding - skills that you may not be able to develop in the workplace.

I guess you can start by looking at your job and ask yourself if you can get into a management position in the career trajectory you're on. If so, great - stay the course. If you can't see that happening, then maybe an MBA is right for you.

Depending on where you are, there might be a way to find a part-time program that you can do without leaving your current job. If so, your company might help you fund it. I'm not sure about your location, but if you're in LA, Pepperdine has a decent program; as does UCLA. There are tons in NYC - Rutgers and CUNY off the top of my head.

Otherwise, there are distance learning MBAs that you can do, often at your own pace. You can check out the programs at ASU Carey, UNC Kenan-Flagler, and Indiana University/Kelley to start out with.

<blockquote>Two years ago I graduated with a Bachelor degree in Business Administration - concentration marketing.
Untill few months ago I was convinced I want to apply for an MBA, but after a conversation with my current boss I'm not sure anymore if that's my best choice.

Basically I already have a Business Administration degree and I know a little bit of everything (marketing, accounting, finance, economics), but I'm not a real specilist in anything.
So according to my boss, if I continue with an MBA I will learn a lot of usefull skills and things, but still I won't have "a real" profession. Even if I do a concentration in Marketing I won't be as good as someone with MS in Marketing and Advertising.

I would be really thankful if you give me your opinion on that matter. I'm 25, with almost 2 years of post grad working experience, and currently I don't know whether my best choice is to persue MBA degree or to try and specialize in something more particular like MS in Marketing and Advertisment?
</blockquote>
quote
galeona
Thank you very much for the answers.
My biggest concern is - I'm from Europe, so If I study here I can afford to get an MS from one of the TOP 10 European universities (Rotterdame School of Managment), because they have special tuitions (very low) for Europen citizens doing MS in any field.

If I decie to go for MBA in USA or Europe ( the tuitons for those programs are basically the same) I would be able to only apply for not-so-top universities, or small colleges. My bachelour degree GPA is relatively low (2.99) and I can't go for scolarship ... so my choice is basically:

Whether to go for MS in Marketing from a top European university or for MBA from a "casual" university in USA?!
Thank you very much for the answers.
My biggest concern is - I'm from Europe, so If I study here I can afford to get an MS from one of the TOP 10 European universities (Rotterdame School of Managment), because they have special tuitions (very low) for Europen citizens doing MS in any field.

If I decie to go for MBA in USA or Europe ( the tuitons for those programs are basically the same) I would be able to only apply for not-so-top universities, or small colleges. My bachelour degree GPA is relatively low (2.99) and I can't go for scolarship ... so my choice is basically:

Whether to go for MS in Marketing from a top European university or for MBA from a "casual" university in USA?!
quote
Duncan
It really depends on your long term goals.

Of course the other option would be to take an MSc in management in Europe, ideally at one of the schools in the CEMS partnership (http://www.cems.org/mim). That opens up more doors than an unranked MBA.
It really depends on your long term goals.

Of course the other option would be to take an MSc in management in Europe, ideally at one of the schools in the CEMS partnership (http://www.cems.org/mim). That opens up more doors than an unranked MBA.
quote
ezra
Whether to go for MS in Marketing from a top European university or for MBA from a "casual" university in USA?!

If you're looking at schools in the US, make sure that they're accredited by one of the three major accreditation bodies: AACSB, AMBA, or EQUIS.

And if you're serious about applying to US schools, don't worry so much about your undergraduate GPA. The schools will look at it, but only as one part in your overall application. So if you do really well on the GMAT, and have a stellar personal statement, many adcomms will be more lenient about your GPA.

You still should narrow down your search by geography, but a few second tier MBAs in the US you could check out include:

Howard
Northeastern
University of Miami
University of Wisconsin/Lubar (part-time program)
<blockquote> Whether to go for MS in Marketing from a top European university or for MBA from a "casual" university in USA?!</blockquote>
If you're looking at schools in the US, make sure that they're accredited by one of the three major accreditation bodies: AACSB, AMBA, or EQUIS.

And if you're serious about applying to US schools, don't worry so much about your undergraduate GPA. The schools will look at it, but only as one part in your overall application. So if you do really well on the GMAT, and have a stellar personal statement, many adcomms will be more lenient about your GPA.

You still should narrow down your search by geography, but a few second tier MBAs in the US you could check out include:

Howard
Northeastern
University of Miami
University of Wisconsin/Lubar (part-time program)
quote
Sparks
Here's some food for thought (but biased from a European and especially UK perspective):
- Marketing typically offers two routes to senior management: either progressing to a Marketing Director role or to a more general management role, such as a Business Unit Director. You may want to consider which you'd enjoy more.
- At least in the UK, your career progress will chiefly be determined by what you've delivered. That's the 'cake'. When it comes to your CV, an MBA merely adds a little icing on the cake.
- If your career progress isn't as fast as you'd like, then an MBA from a well-ranked school might help you transition from middle to senior management.

Your boss is probably mistaken about what an MBA would do, especially if you went to a top MBA school It would not just give you knowledge, it would transform your leadership, teamworking and decision-making skills.


I agree that's exactly what a top MBA school should do. However, his boss may be like me: jaded from seeing countless people with MBAs from very highly ranked schools ... who don't have decent leadership, teamwork or other soft skills.
Here's some food for thought (but biased from a European and especially UK perspective):
- Marketing typically offers two routes to senior management: either progressing to a Marketing Director role or to a more general management role, such as a Business Unit Director. You may want to consider which you'd enjoy more.
- At least in the UK, your career progress will chiefly be determined by what you've delivered. That's the 'cake'. When it comes to your CV, an MBA merely adds a little icing on the cake.
- If your career progress isn't as fast as you'd like, then an MBA from a well-ranked school might help you transition from middle to senior management.

<blockquote>Your boss is probably mistaken about what an MBA would do, especially if you went to a top MBA school It would not just give you knowledge, it would transform your leadership, teamworking and decision-making skills.
</blockquote>

I agree that's exactly what a top MBA school should do. However, his boss may be like me: jaded from seeing countless people with MBAs from very highly ranked schools ... who don't have decent leadership, teamwork or other soft skills.
quote
ralph
- At least in the UK, your career progress will chiefly be determined by what you've delivered. That's the 'cake'. When it comes to your CV, an MBA merely adds a little icing on the cake.

This is really good advice. Sometimes MBA applicants think that an MBA is only thing they need to get a better job, but this is usually false. In addition to having that MBA, you should have verifiable, progressively responsible work experience under your belt. This is why most of the reputable business schools require you to have at least three years of work experience.

Based on that, here's my advice to galeona: Maybe an MBA will help you, maybe it won't. If you've reached a point in your current job where you feel like you've plateaued, then you should consider an MBA. If you still have room for growth, and your company is increasingly giving you more responsibility (and the pay to go along with it,) then you might want to wait a year or two.
<blockquote>- At least in the UK, your career progress will chiefly be determined by what you've delivered. That's the 'cake'. When it comes to your CV, an MBA merely adds a little icing on the cake.</blockquote>
This is really good advice. Sometimes MBA applicants think that an MBA is only thing they need to get a better job, but this is usually false. In addition to having that MBA, you should have verifiable, progressively responsible work experience under your belt. This is why most of the reputable business schools require you to have at least three years of work experience.

Based on that, here's my advice to galeona: Maybe an MBA will help you, maybe it won't. If you've reached a point in your current job where you feel like you've plateaued, then you should consider an MBA. If you still have room for growth, and your company is increasingly giving you more responsibility (and the pay to go along with it,) then you might want to wait a year or two.
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