the difference between collage, University, and school.


nhma20

hello, I am planing to apply for MBA degree at UK, London.
i am confused which school to choose,
first I need to know what is the difference between collage, University, and school.
what is the difference between privet collage and public university or collage.
and does this affect the degree and its wight in the business market.

hello, I am planing to apply for MBA degree at UK, London.
i am confused which school to choose,
first I need to know what is the difference between collage, University, and school.
what is the difference between privet collage and public university or collage.
and does this affect the degree and its wight in the business market.
quote
saroo

In india school is for small kids, collage is for large kids and university is for adults

In india school is for small kids, collage is for large kids and university is for adults
quote
nhma20

Dear Mr. saroo
i am asking about the difference in UK in India, and as I said I am looking for MBA degree, so I am asking in this content

Dear Mr. saroo
i am asking about the difference in UK in India, and as I said I am looking for MBA degree, so I am asking in this content
quote
saroo

Dear Ms. saroo
i am asking about the difference in UK in India, and as I said I am looking for MBA degree, so I am asking in this content


Dear Nmha21

I donnot know about uk but I am know about india. don't do mba from school do it from university

<blockquote>Dear Ms. saroo
i am asking about the difference in UK in India, and as I said I am looking for MBA degree, so I am asking in this content </blockquote>

Dear Nmha21

I donnot know about uk but I am know about india. don't do mba from school do it from university
quote
Duncan

In the UK, the big difference is between for-profit institutions and non-profit ones. Imperial College, London Business School and the University of Oxford are all respected places. So, the name of an institution is not reliable; the words schools, college and university might be used interchangably. You should use the Financial Times rankings, and MBA accreditations: http://www.find-mba.com/accreditations

There's a big difference between India and Europe: in Europe, accredited MBAs are only open to students with three years' work experience. Without that, the choices are either masters in management from accredited schools (a good choice) and a 'freshers' MBA from an unaccredited school (a bad choice).

In the UK, the big difference is between for-profit institutions and non-profit ones. Imperial College, London Business School and the University of Oxford are all respected places. So, the name of an institution is not reliable; the words schools, college and university might be used interchangably. You should use the Financial Times rankings, and MBA accreditations: http://www.find-mba.com/accreditations

There's a big difference between India and Europe: in Europe, accredited MBAs are only open to students with three years' work experience. Without that, the choices are either masters in management from accredited schools (a good choice) and a 'freshers' MBA from an unaccredited school (a bad choice).
quote
nhma20

Dear Mr. Duncan,
thank you for your replay, the schools and universities you mentioned is very expensive. I am looking for affordable MBA in London, any suggestions .
of course i want a program that is accredited and have a good weight in the business market

Dear Mr. Duncan,
thank you for your replay, the schools and universities you mentioned is very expensive. I am looking for affordable MBA in London, any suggestions .
of course i want a program that is accredited and have a good weight in the business market
quote
Duncan

London is an expensive city. It's not the best place to find an inexpensive, accredited MBA. What's your budget? What's your GMAT score and how much work experience do you have?

London is an expensive city. It's not the best place to find an inexpensive, accredited MBA. What's your budget? What's your GMAT score and how much work experience do you have?
quote
nhma20

well, it has to be London for several personal reasons.
I didn't took GMAT exam yet, but I look for many business schools and it is not a must.
I have over 10 years working experience.
as for my budget in fact it depends, but not more than 15000 English pound.

does the accreditation affect the weight of the MBA in the business market.

well, it has to be London for several personal reasons.
I didn't took GMAT exam yet, but I look for many business schools and it is not a must.
I have over 10 years working experience.
as for my budget in fact it depends, but not more than 15000 English pound.

does the accreditation affect the weight of the MBA in the business market.
quote
Duncan

I don't think there are any accredited MBAs in the UK at that price. Royal Holloway is closest: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/management/prospectivestudents/mba/home.aspx

Yes, accreditation and reputation are key. There's a big difference between the accredited programmes, since they require three years' work experience, and the unaccredited programmes, which are mainly 'freshers' MBAs aimed at recent graduates from overseas who intend to return to their country. Employers have a very different experience of those two kinds of courses, of course.

I cannot recommend one of those to you: they are rather weak. It would be better to take a specialist masters at an accredited school if you don't have the budget for an MBA. You'll need to shop around, and perhaps look at just outside London. Perhaps you already know where in London you will be: look out on the train line to the next large town perhaps?

If you can't afford an accredited school then at least look for traditional universities, the ones which are 50+ years old. I think I'd also look at the top private schools, like Richmond University and Regent's University, which are both inside your budget. They are not accredited but you'll get a better education there than in an unaccredited former polytechnic.

I don't think there are any accredited MBAs in the UK at that price. Royal Holloway is closest: http://www.rhul.ac.uk/management/prospectivestudents/mba/home.aspx

Yes, accreditation and reputation are key. There's a big difference between the accredited programmes, since they require three years' work experience, and the unaccredited programmes, which are mainly 'freshers' MBAs aimed at recent graduates from overseas who intend to return to their country. Employers have a very different experience of those two kinds of courses, of course.

I cannot recommend one of those to you: they are rather weak. It would be better to take a specialist masters at an accredited school if you don't have the budget for an MBA. You'll need to shop around, and perhaps look at just outside London. Perhaps you already know where in London you will be: look out on the train line to the next large town perhaps?

If you can't afford an accredited school then at least look for traditional universities, the ones which are 50+ years old. I think I'd also look at the top private schools, like Richmond University and Regent's University, which are both inside your budget. They are not accredited but you'll get a better education there than in an unaccredited former polytechnic.
quote
nhma20

originally i was looking for MBA for creative industries http://www.ucreative.ac.uk/mba-creative-industries
this is was one of the choices, since it matches my previous study and my career goal, but then i thought a normal MBA would be better and more useful and would open a chance in other industries as well, so I am really very confused right now

originally i was looking for MBA for creative industries http://www.ucreative.ac.uk/mba-creative-industries
this is was one of the choices, since it matches my previous study and my career goal, but then i thought a normal MBA would be better and more useful and would open a chance in other industries as well, so I am really very confused right now
quote
Duncan

If you want to return to your home country and start your own business (i.e. if the reputation of the degree to employers does not matter to you) then any course will do. But you will have much more value from attending an accredited programme, ideally in a FT-ranked business school and ideally at a traditional university. This is an unaccredited and tiny MBA at a no-name school that's only a few years old.

If that south-west London location is good for you, then look at Surrey, Royal Holloway and Kingston.

If you want to return to your home country and start your own business (i.e. if the reputation of the degree to employers does not matter to you) then any course will do. But you will have much more value from attending an accredited programme, ideally in a FT-ranked business school and ideally at a traditional university. This is an unaccredited and tiny MBA at a no-name school that's only a few years old.

If that south-west London location is good for you, then look at Surrey, Royal Holloway and Kingston.
quote
nhma20

no in fact I am looking forward to stay in London.
what do u mean by traditional university, and how can I know that, and how can I know the no. of years the school has been offering its degree.

and what do you think of the MBA for creative industry program I sent you

no in fact I am looking forward to stay in London.
what do u mean by traditional university, and how can I know that, and how can I know the no. of years the school has been offering its degree.

and what do you think of the MBA for creative industry program I sent you
quote
nhma20

I mean staying in London after finishing my study and to work there

I mean staying in London after finishing my study and to work there
quote
Duncan

Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_UK_universities_by_date_of_foundation

I think the issue isn't really now long and MBA has been running, but the quality of the students, the experience, the alumni network and so on. Oxford and Cambridge have rather recent MBAs, only 20 years old, but they are excellent. That's why the FT rankings, AMBA accreditation and eduniversal are so great www.eduniversal-ranking.com/business-school-university-ranking-in-united-kingdom.html .

If you want to work in the UK then take a degree at a school that successfully places international students into jobs in the UK. Use the FT rankings for MBA and Masters in management and add the field called 'international mobility'.

In between the MBA and the MiM degrees are specialist MScs (in finance, marketing, operations etc). These could be a great option. I suggest you look at the business schools that are best for mobility (see rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/masters-in-management-2013). In London, that's LSE, ESCP Europe, Imperial and Cass. Perhaps these schools have specialist masters, in marketing, innovation etc that work for you?

Henley, Brunel, Kingston, Surrey might be second-tier options, then you're looking at the University of London colleges, which have a great reputation but perhaps weaker careers services: UCL, King's College, Queen Mary, Goldsmiths, Royal Holloway.

PS The MBA in creative industries looks terrible as a route into work, partly because the creative industries are low-wage and precarious at the bottom. There's a lot of freelance work and unpaid internships. If you must take this risky career direction, then go to Central St Martins.

Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_UK_universities_by_date_of_foundation

I think the issue isn't really now long and MBA has been running, but the quality of the students, the experience, the alumni network and so on. Oxford and Cambridge have rather recent MBAs, only 20 years old, but they are excellent. That's why the FT rankings, AMBA accreditation and eduniversal are so great www.eduniversal-ranking.com/business-school-university-ranking-in-united-kingdom.html .

If you want to work in the UK then take a degree at a school that successfully places international students into jobs in the UK. Use the FT rankings for MBA and Masters in management and add the field called 'international mobility'.

In between the MBA and the MiM degrees are specialist MScs (in finance, marketing, operations etc). These could be a great option. I suggest you look at the business schools that are best for mobility (see rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/masters-in-management-2013). In London, that's LSE, ESCP Europe, Imperial and Cass. Perhaps these schools have specialist masters, in marketing, innovation etc that work for you?

Henley, Brunel, Kingston, Surrey might be second-tier options, then you're looking at the University of London colleges, which have a great reputation but perhaps weaker careers services: UCL, King's College, Queen Mary, Goldsmiths, Royal Holloway.

PS The MBA in creative industries looks terrible as a route into work, partly because the creative industries are low-wage and precarious at the bottom. There's a lot of freelance work and unpaid internships. If you must take this risky career direction, then go to Central St Martins.
quote
nhma20

thank you so much for your great help, I will study all these options and see the best fit.

last question what is FT ranking

thank you so much for your great help, I will study all these options and see the best fit.

last question what is FT ranking
quote
Duncan

See rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/global-mba-ranking-2013 and http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/masters-in-management-2013

See rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/global-mba-ranking-2013 and http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/masters-in-management-2013
quote

In the United States, the word "school" describes any place where people learn. You can call a college a "school." You can even call a university a "school." You can use the word "school" for any English language institute, undergraduate or graduate program, or secondary ("high") school.

U.S. university or college follows after high school, or secondary school. A college in the U.S.A. is not a high school or secondary school. College and university programs begin in the thirteenth year of school, when a student is 17 or 18 years old or older. A two-year college offers an associate's degree, as well as certificates. A four-year college or university offers a bachelor's degree. Programs that offer these degrees are called "undergraduate" schools.

A "university" is a group of schools for studies after secondary school. At least one of these schools is a college where students receive a bachelor's degree. The other schools in a university are"graduate" (also known as "postgraduate") schools where students receive advanced degrees. Therefore, a university offers both the bachelor's degree and graduate degrees such as the master's (M.A.) and doctorate (Ph.D.).

You can earn a bachelor's degree at either a college or a university. However, students in the U.S.A. prefer to use the word "college" rather than the word "university" when they talk about four-year undergraduate programs and the bachelor's degree. They use phrases like,"going to college" and "a college degree," when they talk about undergraduate programs at either a college or a university.

Most "colleges" are separate schools. They are not located in a university. Some colleges are part of a university and are located on the university campus. (The "campus" is the school buildings and surrounding area). A few colleges offer graduate programs in selected subjects. However, it is usually universities that offer graduate programs. So, Americans use the word" university" and not "college" when they talk about graduate study.

In the United States, the word "school" describes any place where people learn. You can call a college a "school." You can even call a university a "school." You can use the word "school" for any English language institute, undergraduate or graduate program, or secondary ("high") school.

U.S. university or college follows after high school, or secondary school. A college in the U.S.A. is not a high school or secondary school. College and university programs begin in the thirteenth year of school, when a student is 17 or 18 years old or older. A two-year college offers an associate's degree, as well as certificates. A four-year college or university offers a bachelor's degree. Programs that offer these degrees are called "undergraduate" schools.

A "university" is a group of schools for studies after secondary school. At least one of these schools is a college where students receive a bachelor's degree. The other schools in a university are"graduate" (also known as "postgraduate") schools where students receive advanced degrees. Therefore, a university offers both the bachelor's degree and graduate degrees such as the master's (M.A.) and doctorate (Ph.D.).

You can earn a bachelor's degree at either a college or a university. However, students in the U.S.A. prefer to use the word "college" rather than the word "university" when they talk about four-year undergraduate programs and the bachelor's degree. They use phrases like,"going to college" and "a college degree," when they talk about undergraduate programs at either a college or a university.

Most "colleges" are separate schools. They are not located in a university. Some colleges are part of a university and are located on the university campus. (The "campus" is the school buildings and surrounding area). A few colleges offer graduate programs in selected subjects. However, it is usually universities that offer graduate programs. So, Americans use the word" university" and not "college" when they talk about graduate study.
quote

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