PSW : post study work visa


kk_kimster
There's an ongoing tussle as many of u might know about whether PSW should be removed or not in April 2011. I have spoken to the admission dept of few of the schools and they said they too have been vocal about it against the govt's insensible views.

What's the real scene out there? I have an offer from SBS but without a PSW, there's no point in going to UK.
There's an ongoing tussle as many of u might know about whether PSW should be removed or not in April 2011. I have spoken to the admission dept of few of the schools and they said they too have been vocal about it against the govt's insensible views.

What's the real scene out there? I have an offer from SBS but without a PSW, there's no point in going to UK.
quote
parulsh04
Yes i agree, have spoken to many consultants n they dnt hav ne idea either.........the UK border agency site also doesnt make d picture ne clearer :-(
Yes i agree, have spoken to many consultants n they dnt hav ne idea either.........the UK border agency site also doesnt make d picture ne clearer :-(
quote
scroogee
Hi all,

Truly these are some disturbing time, with no clarity at all. I also spoke to few college consultants who visited India (bangalore), they also were as clueless as me. :(
So, I decided to get to the bottom of the issue & find out why UK govt. is planning to take a decision like this. It doesn't make any sense or serve any purpose, if they remove PSW visa completely UK govt will end up losing 10billion pounds every year, which they get from international students. UK govt. can't afford that. Students will turn their attention toward univ. in US, Canada or Europe instead, which would adversely affect the rankings & reputation of UK Universities. Universities like Oxbridge, LSE, LBS, and Imperial can't let that happen, it's too much on stake for them & they will do everything that they can to stop the UK govt to remove PSW completely.
What I have understood after reading numerous articles is that they are only going to amend the existing PSW visa rule in following ways:
a) They would increase the entry qualification of candidates who wants to join the University, this would include past record of high & consistent grades by the applicants, reputation of univ. they pursued their course. Also higher IELTS score would be required from candidates.
b) They are also considering few points on which the Universities in UK would be evaluated. So, if universities have to recruit International students into UK then they should fulfill these parameters. This will ensure bogus universities don't have the power to have foreign intake. This means students who had plans to join univ. like Oxbridge, LBS, LSE, Imperial, Warwick, Lancaster & few more shouldn't be worried about their prospects.
c) Also there are suggestions to cut down the PSW tenure from 2yrs to 1yr, which to an extent will stop those students coming to UK who works full time even during their time of education. These students? takes up low skilled jobs like working in petrol pump, restaurants, as delivery boys, supermarket etc., these jobs could have easily employed many UK citizens without any high qualifications and thus reducing the highest unemployment rates which UK is facing at present.
I?m giving the address of two links which helped me understand the current situation. Please go through it, it?s a nice read.
1) http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/feb/01/crackdown-student-visas-unpleasant-abuses?INTCMP=SRCH
2) http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/policyandlaw/consultations/students/student-consultation.pdf?view=Binary

Hopefully everything turns out well for us, we all have put in lots of hard work behind the application process & now when we finally got admissions into our dream univ. it?s heartbreaking to see such an uncertain situation on which we don?t have any control on.
Regards,
Sreejith
Hi all,

Truly these are some disturbing time, with no clarity at all. I also spoke to few college consultants who visited India (bangalore), they also were as clueless as me. :(
So, I decided to get to the bottom of the issue & find out why UK govt. is planning to take a decision like this. It doesn't make any sense or serve any purpose, if they remove PSW visa completely UK govt will end up losing 10billion pounds every year, which they get from international students. UK govt. can't afford that. Students will turn their attention toward univ. in US, Canada or Europe instead, which would adversely affect the rankings & reputation of UK Universities. Universities like Oxbridge, LSE, LBS, and Imperial can't let that happen, it's too much on stake for them & they will do everything that they can to stop the UK govt to remove PSW completely.
What I have understood after reading numerous articles is that they are only going to amend the existing PSW visa rule in following ways:
a) They would increase the entry qualification of candidates who wants to join the University, this would include past record of high & consistent grades by the applicants, reputation of univ. they pursued their course. Also higher IELTS score would be required from candidates.
b) They are also considering few points on which the Universities in UK would be evaluated. So, if universities have to recruit International students into UK then they should fulfill these parameters. This will ensure bogus universities don't have the power to have foreign intake. This means students who had plans to join univ. like Oxbridge, LBS, LSE, Imperial, Warwick, Lancaster & few more shouldn't be worried about their prospects.
c) Also there are suggestions to cut down the PSW tenure from 2yrs to 1yr, which to an extent will stop those students coming to UK who works full time even during their time of education. These students? takes up low skilled jobs like working in petrol pump, restaurants, as delivery boys, supermarket etc., these jobs could have easily employed many UK citizens without any high qualifications and thus reducing the highest unemployment rates which UK is facing at present.
I?m giving the address of two links which helped me understand the current situation. Please go through it, it?s a nice read.
1) http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/feb/01/crackdown-student-visas-unpleasant-abuses?INTCMP=SRCH
2) http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/policyandlaw/consultations/students/student-consultation.pdf?view=Binary

Hopefully everything turns out well for us, we all have put in lots of hard work behind the application process & now when we finally got admissions into our dream univ. it?s heartbreaking to see such an uncertain situation on which we don?t have any control on.
Regards,
Sreejith
quote
kk_kimster
Sreejith,

That was a nice read as you have nicely put up ur analysis and I myself have garnered few similar points and am pretty much sure that 'abolishing PSW' is the last thing the govt would do. The universities whom I have talked to are heavily lobbying against it along with many VCs in the ministry who just don't understand any sense if they proceed with the proposals.

I have an offer from Strathclyde and they said they will weaver IELTS for me as I did my education in English medium for 16+ yrs. My doubt is, if the govt implement the new English qualification rule, would it effect my existing application for SBS which is almost in the closing stages? I hope not because they have reviewed my profile including GMAT and have conducted an interview as well and asking me to further improve my credentials would be unfair. I'm just curios about it, could someone explain?
Sreejith,

That was a nice read as you have nicely put up ur analysis and I myself have garnered few similar points and am pretty much sure that 'abolishing PSW' is the last thing the govt would do. The universities whom I have talked to are heavily lobbying against it along with many VCs in the ministry who just don't understand any sense if they proceed with the proposals.

I have an offer from Strathclyde and they said they will weaver IELTS for me as I did my education in English medium for 16+ yrs. My doubt is, if the govt implement the new English qualification rule, would it effect my existing application for SBS which is almost in the closing stages? I hope not because they have reviewed my profile including GMAT and have conducted an interview as well and asking me to further improve my credentials would be unfair. I'm just curios about it, could someone explain?
quote
parulsh04
kk_kimster congratulations on your offer.........wel y dnt u take IELTS.........y do u evn want 2 take a chance....If u hav been accepted in strathclyd n u hav an offer in hand, dey probably wud nt ask u 4 IELTS score later........but u dnt want 2 c all ur hardwrk go dwn d drain, do u? If i wer u i wud nt take a chance.........i m myself waitin 4 dem 2 respond 2 my application...........hav nt heard 4m dem yet :-(
kk_kimster congratulations on your offer.........wel y dnt u take IELTS.........y do u evn want 2 take a chance....If u hav been accepted in strathclyd n u hav an offer in hand, dey probably wud nt ask u 4 IELTS score later........but u dnt want 2 c all ur hardwrk go dwn d drain, do u? If i wer u i wud nt take a chance.........i m myself waitin 4 dem 2 respond 2 my application...........hav nt heard 4m dem yet :-(
quote
scroogee
@ kk_kimster,

Exactly, I agree with what parulsh04 said. Why take chances? Moreover, once the amendments are made in new PSW Visa rule IELTS might become essential. Both for the intake into the university & also a parameter used by UK Govt. to evaluate and decide whether to grant you PSW Visa after your studies in UK. Please take the test, you have ample time before you join.

Regards,
Sreejith
@ kk_kimster,

Exactly, I agree with what parulsh04 said. Why take chances? Moreover, once the amendments are made in new PSW Visa rule IELTS might become essential. Both for the intake into the university & also a parameter used by UK Govt. to evaluate and decide whether to grant you PSW Visa after your studies in UK. Please take the test, you have ample time before you join.

Regards,
Sreejith
quote
ralph
This is an interesting situation, one that I fear we will encounter as countries take political moves to show their populations that they can tighten their belts, but really are not helpful.

I just read a GMAC study that said that in the past 5 years, the UK has been attracting more and more MBAs from abroad - MBAs that strengthen the workforce after they graduate. But if these changes to restrict visas go into effect, this growth will undoubtedly be curbed.

What I think will happen if they restrict visas for foreign nationals: the foreign nationals will instead go to countries that are more open with their visa policies, spending their money on MBA programs in mainland Europe and in Asia. The tuition fees, living expenses, etc., and the qualities that each MBA would have added to the UK economy, will move away. And they probably won't realize it until it's too late - or at least after the government has gone through an election and there is less "austerity" madness.
This is an interesting situation, one that I fear we will encounter as countries take political moves to show their populations that they can tighten their belts, but really are not helpful.

I just read a GMAC study that said that in the past 5 years, the UK has been attracting more and more MBAs from abroad - MBAs that strengthen the workforce after they graduate. But if these changes to restrict visas go into effect, this growth will undoubtedly be curbed.

What I think will happen if they restrict visas for foreign nationals: the foreign nationals will instead go to countries that are more open with their visa policies, spending their money on MBA programs in mainland Europe and in Asia. The tuition fees, living expenses, etc., and the qualities that each MBA would have added to the UK economy, will move away. And they probably won't realize it until it's too late - or at least after the government has gone through an election and there is less "austerity" madness.
quote
kk_kimster
There's still hope afterall........the article may bring some smiles

British Govt may water down student visa crackdown

Student visa news By Hannah Brenton 07.03.2011

Campaigners have taken heart from signs the government may water down its new student visa regime.

Universities minister David Willetts told a home affairs select committee last week there were "grey areas" and "fuzzy boundaries" to be investigated.

In particular, he said the rules governing dependants and the post-study work route were still under discussion.

"These are the absolutely grey areas that we identified in the consultation document and are now considering with the Home Office," Mr Willetts said.

"Bringing in dependants, that can increase the migration figures and they're not coming here to study. To what extent does people's ability to bring in dependants affect their own willingness to come to study?"

Asked whether the post-study work route should be abolished, Mr Willetts said it was a feature of UK higher education and part of the "fuzzy boundary".

"It is a feature, but there may be ways in which we can tighten it up or make sure that it's not abused or not becoming a route to settlement," he said.

"There are a whole range of options between complete closure of the route and the status quo.

"There are certainly universities that tell us very clearly that if they were completely to lose the post-study work option that would put them at a disadvantage."

University and student groups responded cautiously to Mr Willetts' comments.

University and Colleges Union general secretary Sally Hunt said it was "encouraging", but claimed the coalition were pursuing "knee-jerk populist immigration policies".

"UK higher education is suffering from enormous cuts and the last thing we need are knee-jerk populist immigration policies that risk further damage to our universities," she said.

"Although it is encouraging to hear a minister acknowledge that government policy may do some damage, we have a long way to go before anything this government is doing to higher education could be considered welcomed."

Dr Wendy Piatt, director general of the Russell Group, said students would choose to study elsewhere if the government scrapped post-study work.

"The government should consider changes to post-study work visas very carefully," she said.

"If we do not offer international UK university graduates the opportunity to work for a short period in highly skilled jobs, some of the world's brightest students will choose to study elsewhere."

NUS president Aaron Porter urged ministers to further rethink their overall approach to international students.

"Most international students leave the UK after their studies finish taking with them links that can form into global business partnerships in the future," he said.

"Those that stay go into highly skilled work and research and contribute to the UK economy.

"There must be an urgent rethink of this policy to ensure our students and universities do not suffer because of a knee-jerk ideological reaction to international students."

Mr Willetts' comments offered a much softer line than that taken last month by immigration minister Damian Green.

Mr Green argued the student visa system was subject to "widespread" abuse and said the government would limit the number of dependants and the right to work.

"There will be a greater emphasis on quality and we shall drive abuse out of the system," he said.

"The primary objective of studying in the UK must be to study, not to work or to acquire long-term residency status."

The coalition has pledged to reduce net migration from "hundreds of thousands to tens of thousands" by 2015.

With two-thirds of non-EU migrants entering the UK on student visas, tightening the system is a key part of the strategy.

The Home Office said the government would make an announcement "in due course".

"This government wants to ensure that the primary reason for those who enter on a student visa is genuinely to come here to study. We are working closely with the Department for Business and will make an announcement in due course," a spokesperson said.
There's still hope afterall........the article may bring some smiles

British Govt may water down student visa crackdown

Student visa news By Hannah Brenton 07.03.2011

Campaigners have taken heart from signs the government may water down its new student visa regime.

Universities minister David Willetts told a home affairs select committee last week there were "grey areas" and "fuzzy boundaries" to be investigated.

In particular, he said the rules governing dependants and the post-study work route were still under discussion.

"These are the absolutely grey areas that we identified in the consultation document and are now considering with the Home Office," Mr Willetts said.

"Bringing in dependants, that can increase the migration figures and they're not coming here to study. To what extent does people's ability to bring in dependants affect their own willingness to come to study?"

Asked whether the post-study work route should be abolished, Mr Willetts said it was a feature of UK higher education and part of the "fuzzy boundary".

"It is a feature, but there may be ways in which we can tighten it up or make sure that it's not abused or not becoming a route to settlement," he said.

"There are a whole range of options between complete closure of the route and the status quo.

"There are certainly universities that tell us very clearly that if they were completely to lose the post-study work option that would put them at a disadvantage."

University and student groups responded cautiously to Mr Willetts' comments.

University and Colleges Union general secretary Sally Hunt said it was "encouraging", but claimed the coalition were pursuing "knee-jerk populist immigration policies".

"UK higher education is suffering from enormous cuts and the last thing we need are knee-jerk populist immigration policies that risk further damage to our universities," she said.

"Although it is encouraging to hear a minister acknowledge that government policy may do some damage, we have a long way to go before anything this government is doing to higher education could be considered welcomed."

Dr Wendy Piatt, director general of the Russell Group, said students would choose to study elsewhere if the government scrapped post-study work.

"The government should consider changes to post-study work visas very carefully," she said.

"If we do not offer international UK university graduates the opportunity to work for a short period in highly skilled jobs, some of the world's brightest students will choose to study elsewhere."

NUS president Aaron Porter urged ministers to further rethink their overall approach to international students.

"Most international students leave the UK after their studies finish taking with them links that can form into global business partnerships in the future," he said.

"Those that stay go into highly skilled work and research and contribute to the UK economy.

"There must be an urgent rethink of this policy to ensure our students and universities do not suffer because of a knee-jerk ideological reaction to international students."

Mr Willetts' comments offered a much softer line than that taken last month by immigration minister Damian Green.

Mr Green argued the student visa system was subject to "widespread" abuse and said the government would limit the number of dependants and the right to work.

"There will be a greater emphasis on quality and we shall drive abuse out of the system," he said.

"The primary objective of studying in the UK must be to study, not to work or to acquire long-term residency status."

The coalition has pledged to reduce net migration from "hundreds of thousands to tens of thousands" by 2015.

With two-thirds of non-EU migrants entering the UK on student visas, tightening the system is a key part of the strategy.

The Home Office said the government would make an announcement "in due course".

"This government wants to ensure that the primary reason for those who enter on a student visa is genuinely to come here to study. We are working closely with the Department for Business and will make an announcement in due course," a spokesperson said.
quote
kk_kimster
here's the link

http://www.studentvisa4u.com/british-govt-may-water-down-student-visa-crackdown
here's the link

http://www.studentvisa4u.com/british-govt-may-water-down-student-visa-crackdown
quote
Tougher criteria for people wanting to come to the UK to study and limits on their right to work are among major reforms to the student visas system announced today.

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/media-centre/news/major-student-changes
Tougher criteria for people wanting to come to the UK to study and limits on their right to work are among major reforms to the student visas system announced today.

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/media-centre/news/major-student-changes
quote
kk_kimster
That is not a good news for those who intent to work after study and repay their hefty investments they make for doing an MBA from UK. Let me not make a juvenile conclusion as the following days could provide a clearer picture.
That is not a good news for those who intent to work after study and repay their hefty investments they make for doing an MBA from UK. Let me not make a juvenile conclusion as the following days could provide a clearer picture.
quote
kk_kimster
My agent told me that the PSW scrap will take effect only from the next batch onwards meaning those who have applied or are applying for this year have this provision. I can't really throw too much light into this as from what I have heard from SBS, they are yet to unravel the mystery of PSW regarding whom and all it could effect.

Now, definitely the 2012-2013 admits wouldn't have an option of PSW rather they need to attain a TIER 2 sponsor within few months from graduation to remain in the UK. Following excerpt would help to understand this

In a move that will impact Indian students planning to study in the UK, the two year post-study leave to remain in the UK is being discontinued. International graduates will, however, be allowed to remain in the UK if they have skilled job offers under the Tier 2 work permit category. ?The students will be given 3-4 months after they finish their studies to look for a job. But graduates will not be allowed to take up unskilled jobs and will need a Tier 2 sponsor,? UK Border Agency regional director in Delhi, Chris Dix said.

hence the situation ain't as bad as some would have feared.

I will update you guys once I get to know the status of PSW for the 2011-2012 admits.

KK
My agent told me that the PSW scrap will take effect only from the next batch onwards meaning those who have applied or are applying for this year have this provision. I can't really throw too much light into this as from what I have heard from SBS, they are yet to unravel the mystery of PSW regarding whom and all it could effect.

Now, definitely the 2012-2013 admits wouldn't have an option of PSW rather they need to attain a TIER 2 sponsor within few months from graduation to remain in the UK. Following excerpt would help to understand this

In a move that will impact Indian students planning to study in the UK, the two year post-study leave to remain in the UK is being discontinued. International graduates will, however, be allowed to remain in the UK if they have skilled job offers under the Tier 2 work permit category. ?The students will be given 3-4 months after they finish their studies to look for a job. But graduates will not be allowed to take up unskilled jobs and will need a Tier 2 sponsor,? UK Border Agency regional director in Delhi, Chris Dix said.

hence the situation ain't as bad as some would have feared.

I will update you guys once I get to know the status of PSW for the 2011-2012 admits.

KK
quote
kk_kimster
More info coming in........

1. While the general post-study visa route will end in April 2012, non-EU students graduating with a recognised degree and who have been offered a job paying at least £20k will be able to switch into Tier 2, the work permit route. Employers taking on graduates in these conditions will not be burdened with the time-consuming 'resident labour market test' that has caused delays in the past.

2. Dependents of those doing an MBA (12 months) can work if I understand correctly.

3. Normally, most employers who offer jobs for MBA grads do fall under the Tier2 sponsor category and hence it wouldn't be an 'added difficulty' to sponsor a Tier2 visa if they feel that the graduate can contribute to the growth of the company. On the flip side, with the PSW, the employers had the luxury of gauging a candidate for 6 months before sponsoring him for a Tier2. Now they have to rely on the talent and sponsor a visa which some companies may have a grudge to. Still, its a back door policy and shows the intent of the govt to retain the best students from top B-schools.
More info coming in........

1. While the general post-study visa route will end in April 2012, non-EU students graduating with a recognised degree and who have been offered a job paying at least £20k will be able to switch into Tier 2, the work permit route. Employers taking on graduates in these conditions will not be burdened with the time-consuming 'resident labour market test' that has caused delays in the past.

2. Dependents of those doing an MBA (12 months) can work if I understand correctly.

3. Normally, most employers who offer jobs for MBA grads do fall under the Tier2 sponsor category and hence it wouldn't be an 'added difficulty' to sponsor a Tier2 visa if they feel that the graduate can contribute to the growth of the company. On the flip side, with the PSW, the employers had the luxury of gauging a candidate for 6 months before sponsoring him for a Tier2. Now they have to rely on the talent and sponsor a visa which some companies may have a grudge to. Still, its a back door policy and shows the intent of the govt to retain the best students from top B-schools.
quote
kk_kimster
Here's how Cambridge has comprehended the PSW scrap.......

"However, the impact of closing the PSW visa route might not be as large as the inevitable media attention might suggest. An non-EU MBA student enrolled in a 12-month program, such as the Cambridge MBA, would have a visa valid for 16 months anyway. And from our observations, most non-EU students who ultimately work in the UK do so by finding a job within 3 months after graduation."

That said, I personally know guys who had many sleepless nights hunting for jobs even after 4 or 5 months. If the opinion of Mr. Chris Dix is anything to go by, then there's hope as a further 3 or 4 months of breathing space from the student visa expiry date would prove handy.

KK
Here's how Cambridge has comprehended the PSW scrap.......

"However, the impact of closing the PSW visa route might not be as large as the inevitable media attention might suggest. An non-EU MBA student enrolled in a 12-month program, such as the Cambridge MBA, would have a visa valid for 16 months anyway. And from our observations, most non-EU students who ultimately work in the UK do so by finding a job within 3 months after graduation."

That said, I personally know guys who had many sleepless nights hunting for jobs even after 4 or 5 months. If the opinion of Mr. Chris Dix is anything to go by, then there's hope as a further 3 or 4 months of breathing space from the student visa expiry date would prove handy.

KK
quote
parulsh04
Hey KK ........so wil Indian students goin 2 Uk in sept 2011 get PSW after completion of course.............a lot is being said about the recent changes but the picture still isn't quite clear to me
Hey KK ........so wil Indian students goin 2 Uk in sept 2011 get PSW after completion of course.............a lot is being said about the recent changes but the picture still isn't quite clear to me
quote
Hey KK ........so wil Indian students goin 2 Uk in sept 2011 get PSW after completion of course.............a lot is being said about the recent changes but the picture still isn't quite clear to me


NO loud and clear NO so you pack your bags and leave before your tier 4 student visa expires
<blockquote>Hey KK ........so wil Indian students goin 2 Uk in sept 2011 get PSW after completion of course.............a lot is being said about the recent changes but the picture still isn't quite clear to me</blockquote>

NO loud and clear NO so you pack your bags and leave before your tier 4 student visa expires
quote

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