MBA OFFER


Carolyne

Hallo,
I have gotten an offer at Portsmouth University,please advice is it a good school,considering i have applied to drexel,Alvernia Universities in USA and Edinburgh in UK?
I am looking at quality,affordability,and work opportunity after the MBA.
My budget is about 2M Kenya shillings.i have 2 years work experience

Hallo,
I have gotten an offer at Portsmouth University,please advice is it a good school,considering i have applied to drexel,Alvernia Universities in USA and Edinburgh in UK?
I am looking at quality,affordability,and work opportunity after the MBA.
My budget is about 2M Kenya shillings.i have 2 years work experience
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Duncan

Partsmouth is an okay school: it has AMBA accreditation, but it's not a large or well known school. There's more than one business school in Edinburgh, but the University of Edinburgh is better than Portsmouth and Herriot-Watt is much worse. Drexal is better than Portsmouth and Alvernia less good.

Partsmouth is an okay school: it has AMBA accreditation, but it's not a large or well known school. There's more than one business school in Edinburgh, but the University of Edinburgh is better than Portsmouth and Herriot-Watt is much worse. Drexal is better than Portsmouth and Alvernia less good.
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Carolyne

hallo,
Thanks for your prompt response,now i am considering choosing between UK universities with AMBA accreditation like Edinburgh Napier university,Portsmouth,LSBF,Birmingham vs a university in USA with AACSB accreditation like drexel,Temple,Penn state university but they are expensive as compared to UK program.
What would you advice, is USA MBA better than a UK MBA and do the accreditation's matter,like if a school has only AMBA while others have both AMBA and AACSB?
I want to stick to my budget(kshs 2M) and still get quality education.
Also which place has a better chance of employment after my MBA,USA or UK?
Thank you in advance

hallo,
Thanks for your prompt response,now i am considering choosing between UK universities with AMBA accreditation like Edinburgh Napier university,Portsmouth,LSBF,Birmingham vs a university in USA with AACSB accreditation like drexel,Temple,Penn state university but they are expensive as compared to UK program.
What would you advice, is USA MBA better than a UK MBA and do the accreditation's matter,like if a school has only AMBA while others have both AMBA and AACSB?
I want to stick to my budget(kshs 2M) and still get quality education.
Also which place has a better chance of employment after my MBA,USA or UK?
Thank you in advance

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Mamit

If its not urgent then i would suggest you should wait for an year and gather 3 years of work exp. and also try to take GMAT. you will have access to much better schools then what you are currently targeting.
Regards
Mamit

If its not urgent then i would suggest you should wait for an year and gather 3 years of work exp. and also try to take GMAT. you will have access to much better schools then what you are currently targeting.
Regards
Mamit
quote
Duncan

I'm pretty sure that Edinburgh Napier University doesn't have AMBA accreditation. Neither does LSBF, whose main MBA is from London Met (although it does have one MBA option with Grenoble, which is accredited).

As Mamit says, an accredited school will be better. As a rule of thumb, set your career goals and then choose the school. There's no point being neutral between the UK and US, because they open quite different doors.

I'm pretty sure that Edinburgh Napier University doesn't have AMBA accreditation. Neither does LSBF, whose main MBA is from London Met (although it does have one MBA option with Grenoble, which is accredited).

As Mamit says, an accredited school will be better. As a rule of thumb, set your career goals and then choose the school. There's no point being neutral between the UK and US, because they open quite different doors.
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I am a permanent resident of the U.S with an offer from University of Glasgow, Henley Business School, and Durham University (Full-Time MBA). My concern is getting a job after the program and would be grateful if someone on here can enlighten me as to the best among them in terms of job prospect....I mean better career services and network and stuff.

Thanks.

I am a permanent resident of the U.S with an offer from University of Glasgow, Henley Business School, and Durham University (Full-Time MBA). My concern is getting a job after the program and would be grateful if someone on here can enlighten me as to the best among them in terms of job prospect....I mean better career services and network and stuff.

Thanks.
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Duncan

Do you want to work in the US? Why not study in the US then?

The Henley full-time MBA is in a new format, but generally Henley has shown much better outcomes than Durham for masters' and executive MBA graduates. Henley, as a business school, has more alumni in the US than Durham as an entire university.

Do you want to work in the US? Why not study in the US then?

The Henley full-time MBA is in a new format, but generally Henley has shown much better outcomes than Durham for masters' and executive MBA graduates. Henley, as a business school, has more alumni in the US than Durham as an entire university.
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Thank you. I want to work in the U.S but open to other possibilities - working in Europe. Most of the U.S based Business Schools listed among the world 100 are too expensive comparatively. Also, most of them are two years. Those that are not very expensive have no record in terms of ranking. I put a thought into this before deciding the UK - duration and cost.

If anyone has some kind of experience too regarding the listed schools please do post.

Thank you. I want to work in the U.S but open to other possibilities - working in Europe. Most of the U.S based Business Schools listed among the world 100 are too expensive comparatively. Also, most of them are two years. Those that are not very expensive have no record in terms of ranking. I put a thought into this before deciding the UK - duration and cost.

If anyone has some kind of experience too regarding the listed schools please do post.
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Duncan

Few companies will come to European schools to hire for the US. That means that your job hunting in the US would be totally independent from the school's network and resources. In that case, what's the benefit of being in an FT-ranked school? Between a ranked, mid-status UK university with no real alumni base in the US and an accredited but unranked US MBA with a known brand, a careers service in the US and real alumni network -- I think it's clear that the US option is much less risky.

There are 158 AASCB accredited, one-year MBAs in the USA. http://www.find-mba.com/search/0dd74f4e/1 many of those will have cheaper tuition and lower cost of living than UK schools.

Also, don't think of the tuition as a cost: think of it as an investment. For every $10,000 you send in tuition, you'll probably makes $100,000 extra in your career,

Few companies will come to European schools to hire for the US. That means that your job hunting in the US would be totally independent from the school's network and resources. In that case, what's the benefit of being in an FT-ranked school? Between a ranked, mid-status UK university with no real alumni base in the US and an accredited but unranked US MBA with a known brand, a careers service in the US and real alumni network -- I think it's clear that the US option is much less risky.

There are 158 AASCB accredited, one-year MBAs in the USA. http://www.find-mba.com/search/0dd74f4e/1 many of those will have cheaper tuition and lower cost of living than UK schools.

Also, don't think of the tuition as a cost: think of it as an investment. For every $10,000 you send in tuition, you'll probably makes $100,000 extra in your career,
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@Duncan Thanks for your prompt response. I see from your perspective so you're making a good point. On the other hand, with the U.S unemployment rate going up, don't you think it makes a lot of sense to obtain a triple-accredited MBA to open doors in Europe too? What's your thought on this? With the global job-market reaching its peak in terms of competition, I think a triple-accredited MBA will somewhat place me in an advantage in a narrowed employment market.

@Duncan Thanks for your prompt response. I see from your perspective so you're making a good point. On the other hand, with the U.S unemployment rate going up, don't you think it makes a lot of sense to obtain a triple-accredited MBA to open doors in Europe too? What's your thought on this? With the global job-market reaching its peak in terms of competition, I think a triple-accredited MBA will somewhat place me in an advantage in a narrowed employment market.
quote
Duncan

You didn't mention having European residency, which is really the door opener. Unemployment in Europe is around 11.2% now, compared to 8.2% in the US. Unlike the US, Europe doesn't have a continental job market with a single language. A UK degree doesn't give you an advantage over a US degree in finding work in other European countries.

Don't get me wrong, the schools you are looking at are good for people who want to work in those regions of the UK, or for Indians who can't squeeze in to that country's over-full top-tier schools. But you should study where you want to work. Use your vacation time for vacations.

You didn't mention having European residency, which is really the door opener. Unemployment in Europe is around 11.2% now, compared to 8.2% in the US. Unlike the US, Europe doesn't have a continental job market with a single language. A UK degree doesn't give you an advantage over a US degree in finding work in other European countries.

Don't get me wrong, the schools you are looking at are good for people who want to work in those regions of the UK, or for Indians who can't squeeze in to that country's over-full top-tier schools. But you should study where you want to work. Use your vacation time for vacations.
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James999

It looks even worse for people under 26.... "Eurostat estimates that 25m men and women are unemployed across the full 27-state EU. Youth unemployment hit 22.6pc. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9440579/Eurozone-unemployment-hits-record-high-while-Mario-Monti-sees-light-at-the-end-of-tunnel.html

I agree with Duncan. Even if you are exceptional, employers might ultimately pick a EU member for hire, simply because of easier paperwork, quicker turnaround time and no visa costs.

Some people say that Specialized Masters are the new rave. They are short and less expensive and you can put a good, local brand name on your CV. Did you consider that?

It looks even worse for people under 26.... "Eurostat estimates that 25m men and women are unemployed across the full 27-state EU. Youth unemployment hit 22.6pc. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9440579/Eurozone-unemployment-hits-record-high-while-Mario-Monti-sees-light-at-the-end-of-tunnel.html

I agree with Duncan. Even if you are exceptional, employers might ultimately pick a EU member for hire, simply because of easier paperwork, quicker turnaround time and no visa costs.

Some people say that Specialized Masters are the new rave. They are short and less expensive and you can put a good, local brand name on your CV. Did you consider that?
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Duncan

James raises a good point about specialised masters. There might be more demand for people with specialised skills than with generic skills - and also think about location.

On the Durham MBA, according to the FT, only 68% have a job three months after graduating. It is harder to find work from schools in small, deindustrialising cities, certainly, and Durham is one of the MBAs without the sort of internships and project work that makes it easy to move into work.

In contrast, the Henley MSc in finance has a 94% in employment (on average, of course, at a lower salary since it's a pre-experience course). The MSc's in finance from business schools like London, HEC, Oxford, IE and Peking graduate onto higher salaries than Durham MBAs - and also have around 95% employment after three months.

But also think about location - and specifically about where growth is in the next few years: http://www.pwc.co.uk/the-economy/issues/gdpgrowth.jhtml Argentina, China, India, Indonesia, Saudia Arabia and Turkey. The ESSEC masters in advanced finance, taught across Paris and Singapore, could be a useful path into Asia's financial markets.

James raises a good point about specialised masters. There might be more demand for people with specialised skills than with generic skills - and also think about location.

On the Durham MBA, according to the FT, only 68% have a job three months after graduating. It is harder to find work from schools in small, deindustrialising cities, certainly, and Durham is one of the MBAs without the sort of internships and project work that makes it easy to move into work.

In contrast, the Henley MSc in finance has a 94% in employment (on average, of course, at a lower salary since it's a pre-experience course). The MSc's in finance from business schools like London, HEC, Oxford, IE and Peking graduate onto higher salaries than Durham MBAs - and also have around 95% employment after three months.

But also think about location - and specifically about where growth is in the next few years: http://www.pwc.co.uk/the-economy/issues/gdpgrowth.jhtml Argentina, China, India, Indonesia, Saudia Arabia and Turkey. The ESSEC masters in advanced finance, taught across Paris and Singapore, could be a useful path into Asia's financial markets.
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@Duncan and James I am grateful to you guys for sharing and not holding back. However, I am still interested in a triple-accredited MBA and have narrowed down to Durham and Henley. If you guys can make a suggestion it would be great.

As a matter of fact, no MBA guarantees a job - whether from the U.S or U.K. There is no 'safest belt' in the global economic down turn...maybe Harvard, Stanford, MIT, LSB...not even sure if there's a 100% guarantee of a job for every student graduating from these institutions. I personally know a guy who graduated from Columbia University (MBA) in 2011 and still struggling getting a job. Equally important, there are graduates from lesser-known institutions working full-time. I'll take my chances with either Durham or Henley...any final suggestion/recommendation from you guys?

Thanks.

@Duncan and James I am grateful to you guys for sharing and not holding back. However, I am still interested in a triple-accredited MBA and have narrowed down to Durham and Henley. If you guys can make a suggestion it would be great.

As a matter of fact, no MBA guarantees a job - whether from the U.S or U.K. There is no 'safest belt' in the global economic down turn...maybe Harvard, Stanford, MIT, LSB...not even sure if there's a 100% guarantee of a job for every student graduating from these institutions. I personally know a guy who graduated from Columbia University (MBA) in 2011 and still struggling getting a job. Equally important, there are graduates from lesser-known institutions working full-time. I'll take my chances with either Durham or Henley...any final suggestion/recommendation from you guys?

Thanks.
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Duncan

Henley has a better programme, location and alumni base, so I say Henley.

Henley has a better programme, location and alumni base, so I say Henley.
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Thank you Duncan; I appreciate it.

Thank you Duncan; I appreciate it.
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Mamit

Location wise also Henley takes over Durham.

Location wise also Henley takes over Durham.
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