Where are the best scholarships in Europe and in the US? (at least 50%...)


edma

Hi, I would love to have your feedback on my profile!

Background:
Nationality Italian/Male, almost 30 years old
GMAT: 730 (Q49, V40)

Education:
B.Sc. in Economics - Graduate of the year (1st / with award) from a local state university (no tier)
M.Sc. in Banking and Finance - Graduate of the year (1st / with award) from a local state university (no tier) [same uni as above]

Work experience:
almost 6 year of experience working for an Italian Investment bank (one of the biggest in the country but unknown abroad): 3years as Analyst and 3 years as Trader
Experience: No international experience

Achievements at work:
1 promotion/after 3 yea
I lead a team of colleagues for an internal innovation competition in front of the company Board of Director. We advocated to teach coding skills to all the emplyoees who wanted
to learn coding. The pitch was successful and the project approved with €50k investment in courses.

Co-curriculars:
I achieved the CFA passed all the three levels on the first attempt within three consecutive years
I was selected by Bain & Company for a "Business Courses" reserved for the top 20 graduate students in Italy in 2014
I volunteered as canteen assistant during university
I am volunteering as "CFA Society Italy" member to promote the study of the CFA program with briefing about the exams to candidates.
I practise calisthenics

Post MBA goals:
I would love to work in the investment industry, targeting Hedge Funds or PE/VC.
Other options include IB and Consulting. I am also fascinated by technology but, unfortunately, I do not think to have the proper background.

Target Schools: HBS, Stanford, Wharton, LBS, INSEAD, SDA Bocconi (as last option)

PS: I need a good scholarship (as most of us I guess...)

Questions:
Do you think my achievements will be not so strong since gained in a "local" environment (just Italy)?
I don't have any international exposure, will it be critical for the application?
Do you think my profile has more chance in a particular Bschool?
Where are the best scholarships in Europe and US?

PS 2: Would it be better to go to Bocconi with full-tuition scholarship or to INSEAD/LBS with no scholarships?

Looking forward to hearing from you,
Regards!
thank

Hi, I would love to have your feedback on my profile!

Background:
Nationality Italian/Male, almost 30 years old
GMAT: 730 (Q49, V40)

Education:
B.Sc. in Economics - Graduate of the year (1st / with award) from a local state university (no tier)
M.Sc. in Banking and Finance - Graduate of the year (1st / with award) from a local state university (no tier) [same uni as above]

Work experience:
almost 6 year of experience working for an Italian Investment bank (one of the biggest in the country but unknown abroad): 3years as Analyst and 3 years as Trader
Experience: No international experience

Achievements at work:
1 promotion/after 3 yea
I lead a team of colleagues for an internal innovation competition in front of the company Board of Director. We advocated to teach coding skills to all the emplyoees who wanted
to learn coding. The pitch was successful and the project approved with €50k investment in courses.

Co-curriculars:
I achieved the CFA passed all the three levels on the first attempt within three consecutive years
I was selected by Bain & Company for a "Business Courses" reserved for the top 20 graduate students in Italy in 2014
I volunteered as canteen assistant during university
I am volunteering as "CFA Society Italy" member to promote the study of the CFA program with briefing about the exams to candidates.
I practise calisthenics

Post MBA goals:
I would love to work in the investment industry, targeting Hedge Funds or PE/VC.
Other options include IB and Consulting. I am also fascinated by technology but, unfortunately, I do not think to have the proper background.

Target Schools: HBS, Stanford, Wharton, LBS, INSEAD, SDA Bocconi (as last option)

PS: I need a good scholarship (as most of us I guess...)

Questions:
Do you think my achievements will be not so strong since gained in a "local" environment (just Italy)?
I don't have any international exposure, will it be critical for the application?
Do you think my profile has more chance in a particular Bschool?
Where are the best scholarships in Europe and US?

PS 2: Would it be better to go to Bocconi with full-tuition scholarship or to INSEAD/LBS with no scholarships?

Looking forward to hearing from you,
Regards!
thank
quote
Duncan

Take a look at The sad facts about scholarships http://www.find-mba.com/board/37055

Given your goal, I think it would be mistaken to focus on scholarships.

Take a look at The sad facts about scholarships http://www.find-mba.com/board/37055

Given your goal, I think it would be mistaken to focus on scholarships.
quote
George Pat...

You look like you can apply to the best schools out there with a good shot. Very strong GMAT, good experience, great academics etc.
In my opinion, it would be a shame to end up outside the M7 or LBS.
Aim for the absolute best schools, and they usually have enough money to give some scholarship, but first and foremost, focus on the schools that will help you achieve your goals, not the money.

You look like you can apply to the best schools out there with a good shot. Very strong GMAT, good experience, great academics etc.
In my opinion, it would be a shame to end up outside the M7 or LBS.
Aim for the absolute best schools, and they usually have enough money to give some scholarship, but first and foremost, focus on the schools that will help you achieve your goals, not the money.
quote
edma

Take a look at The sad facts about scholarships http://www.find-mba.com/board/37055

Given your goal, I think it would be mistaken to focus on scholarships.


I understand, but the point is that in Europe all the people keep telling me that an MBA is not worth it because here is not considered as it is in the us. The same (or even worse) is the recognition of the CFA who had no material impact on my career or salary so far... so I wanted to minimized the downside by going in a place such as SDA were I might get a full scholarships or places such as IMD/IESE etc where I can aim for a 50%...

I know that people here are biased towards MBA and they see it as the holy grail/turning point of thier career but the trend in the MBA is shrinking in terms of applications and also the payback periods are increasing since the cost has surged...

that's why I want to minimized the risk of doing an MBA that could turn not that usuful by looking for scholarships...

[Edited by edma on Apr 13, 2020]

[quote]Take a look at The sad facts about scholarships http://www.find-mba.com/board/37055

Given your goal, I think it would be mistaken to focus on scholarships. [/quote]

I understand, but the point is that in Europe all the people keep telling me that an MBA is not worth it because here is not considered as it is in the us. The same (or even worse) is the recognition of the CFA who had no material impact on my career or salary so far... so I wanted to minimized the downside by going in a place such as SDA were I might get a full scholarships or places such as IMD/IESE etc where I can aim for a 50%...

I know that people here are biased towards MBA and they see it as the holy grail/turning point of thier career but the trend in the MBA is shrinking in terms of applications and also the payback periods are increasing since the cost has surged...

that's why I want to minimized the risk of doing an MBA that could turn not that usuful by looking for scholarships...
quote
Duncan

Study the facts. Make rational choices. Don't be led by fear and gossip.

All the people who are speaking to need to look at the FT MBA ranking. It shows that graduates of European MBA programmes have substantial increases in salary and career progression. Those are quite unlike the outcomes from the CFA. The data are available to you. Look at rankings from previous years and see how the earnings are increasing for MBAs at the top schools.

Attending SDA on a scholarship is a false economy *IF* you can attend a better school. The higher lifetime earnings from a better school are much higher than the value of the scholarship.

MBAs are not shrinking in terms of applications. There are simply more ways to take the MBA, and the good schools are taking market share from the small ones.

PS For example, my brother is starting the Cranfield MBA. They have something like 1,000 part-time MBA students. Ten years ago, maybe they had 100. Look at the way all the big business schools are growing like crazy, with more online degrees and more specialized masters.

[Edited by Duncan on Apr 13, 2020]

Study the facts. Make rational choices. Don't be led by fear and gossip.

All the people who are speaking to need to look at the FT MBA ranking. It shows that graduates of European MBA programmes have substantial increases in salary and career progression. Those are quite unlike the outcomes from the CFA. The data are available to you. Look at rankings from previous years and see how the earnings are increasing for MBAs at the top schools.

Attending SDA on a scholarship is a false economy *IF* you can attend a better school. The higher lifetime earnings from a better school are much higher than the value of the scholarship.

MBAs are not shrinking in terms of applications. There are simply more ways to take the MBA, and the good schools are taking market share from the small ones.

PS For example, my brother is starting the Cranfield MBA. They have something like 1,000 part-time MBA students. Ten years ago, maybe they had 100. Look at the way all the big business schools are growing like crazy, with more online degrees and more specialized masters.
quote
Duncan

I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an SDA MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning a quarter more. When you add that up over 30 years or 40 years, it's worth much more over your working life.

PS I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education.

[Edited by Duncan on Apr 13, 2020]

I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an SDA MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning a quarter more. When you add that up over 30 years or 40 years, it's worth much more over your working life.

PS I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education.
quote
edma

I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an Imperial MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning much, much more over your working life. I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education.


I know pretty well what poor education means coz I attended a local state school and I missed tons of opportunities for that... there is no question that top uni are the best choice.. but for bsc and MSc... not for MBA, especially in Europe since this qualification is not so looked for by employers...

on top of that, the article you posted from FT is totally biased since they are the main provider of the rankings and they have business with the schools and readers for that...

Please have a look at these other sources, some have also rankings but they do not rely on them as much as ft:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-an-m-b-a-still-worth-it-11569184032

https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-an-m-b-a-still-worth-it-11569184032

https://poetsandquants.com/2018/03/21/the-alarming-decline-of-the-mbas-value-added-ratio/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamjeakle/2019/10/21/why-no-one-wants-to-be-an-mba-anymore/#2dfad54e4616

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/03/applications-are-down-at-70percent-of-us-mba-programs-including-harvard.html

"U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70 percent of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume this year.

Even the most prestigious institutions were not immune. According to The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business School saw a 4.5 percent decline in applications, Stanford's Graduate School of Business saw a 4.6 percent decline, and Wharton saw a 6.7 percent decline."

[quote]I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an Imperial MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning much, much more over your working life. I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education. [/quote]

I know pretty well what poor education means coz I attended a local state school and I missed tons of opportunities for that... there is no question that top uni are the best choice.. but for bsc and MSc... not for MBA, especially in Europe since this qualification is not so looked for by employers...

on top of that, the article you posted from FT is totally biased since they are the main provider of the rankings and they have business with the schools and readers for that...

Please have a look at these other sources, some have also rankings but they do not rely on them as much as ft:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-an-m-b-a-still-worth-it-11569184032

https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-an-m-b-a-still-worth-it-11569184032

https://poetsandquants.com/2018/03/21/the-alarming-decline-of-the-mbas-value-added-ratio/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamjeakle/2019/10/21/why-no-one-wants-to-be-an-mba-anymore/#2dfad54e4616

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/03/applications-are-down-at-70percent-of-us-mba-programs-including-harvard.html

"U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70 percent of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume this year.

Even the most prestigious institutions were not immune. According to The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business School saw a 4.5 percent decline in applications, Stanford's Graduate School of Business saw a 4.6 percent decline, and Wharton saw a 6.7 percent decline."

quote
edma

I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an SDA MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning a quarter more. When you add that up over 30 years or 40 years, it's worth much more over your working life.

PS I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education.


the FT article is a biased source since they make the rankings, there are many article from
the WSJ or other sources that do not rely so heavily for rankings that clearly say that the trend is down and companies no longer see the MBA as a necessary degree...

"U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70 percent of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume this year.

Even the most prestigious institutions were not immune. According to The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business School saw a 4.5 percent decline in applications, Stanford's Graduate School of Business saw a 4.6 percent decline, and Wharton saw a 6.7 percent decline.

At the same time, the number of applications to international business schools remained stable or increased. The GMAC survey finds that applications for business school programs are up 8.8 percent in Asia, 7.7 percent in Canada and 3.2 percent in Europe. The U.S., however, saw an overall 6.6 percent decline."

[quote]I don't know that payback periods are increasing (https://www.ft.com/content/4b971088-b261-11e7-a398-73d59db9e399) but I do know that it doesn't matter. What matters is the NPV of the MBA. Sure, an SDA MBA takes less time to pay back than one from LBS. But the LBS MBA leaves you earning a quarter more. When you add that up over 30 years or 40 years, it's worth much more over your working life.

PS I threw out a pair of cheap shoes today, less than two years old. I am still wearing a 20-year old pair, much better made. It's the same with education. [/quote]

the FT article is a biased source since they make the rankings, there are many article from
the WSJ or other sources that do not rely so heavily for rankings that clearly say that the trend is down and companies no longer see the MBA as a necessary degree...

"U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications. According to a survey of 1,087 graduate business programs at 363 business schools by the Graduate Management Admission Council, 70 percent of two-year full-time MBA programs in the United States saw a decline in application volume this year.

Even the most prestigious institutions were not immune. According to The Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business School saw a 4.5 percent decline in applications, Stanford's Graduate School of Business saw a 4.6 percent decline, and Wharton saw a 6.7 percent decline.

At the same time, the number of applications to international business schools remained stable or increased. The GMAC survey finds that applications for business school programs are up 8.8 percent in Asia, 7.7 percent in Canada and 3.2 percent in Europe. The U.S., however, saw an overall 6.6 percent decline."

quote
Duncan

The FT certainly has a bias to sell newspapers. But the data in the rankings are not produced by the FT using ten-sided dice. They come from statistically-significant survey data audited by KMPG.

You have missed my point, and misunderstood the context for those articles. Applications for full-time MBAs are falling because more people are taking part-time MBAs. The MBA is not falling in importance.

The FT certainly has a bias to sell newspapers. But the data in the rankings are not produced by the FT using ten-sided dice. They come from statistically-significant survey data audited by KMPG.

You have missed my point, and misunderstood the context for those articles. Applications for full-time MBAs are falling because more people are taking part-time MBAs. The MBA is not falling in importance.
quote
edma

The FT certainly has a bias to sell newspapers. But the data in the rankings are not produced by the FT using ten-sided dice. They come from statistically-significant survey data audited by KMPG.

You have missed my point and misunderstood the context for those articles. Applications for full-time MBAs are falling because more people are taking part-time MBAs. The MBA is not falling in importance.


Actually I got clear your point, you are stating that application are going down bc people take other delivery options (online/part-time etc...) but while these programs may be rising from nothing to something... all of us know that only full-time on-campus MBA have the placement opportunities and career advancement that people are looking for... there is no placement for an on-line degree so far...

so this means that there are fewer people willing to invest in MBA, a traditional one - the only that really matters -, to develop their career. why are they doing that?

the same fact that schools are closing MBA programs (which are the best source of revenues for them) is an alarming fact

[quote]The FT certainly has a bias to sell newspapers. But the data in the rankings are not produced by the FT using ten-sided dice. They come from statistically-significant survey data audited by KMPG.

You have missed my point and misunderstood the context for those articles. Applications for full-time MBAs are falling because more people are taking part-time MBAs. The MBA is not falling in importance. [/quote]

Actually I got clear your point, you are stating that application are going down bc people take other delivery options (online/part-time etc...) but while these programs may be rising from nothing to something... all of us know that only full-time on-campus MBA have the placement opportunities and career advancement that people are looking for... there is no placement for an on-line degree so far...

so this means that there are fewer people willing to invest in MBA, a traditional one - the only that really matters -, to develop their career. why are they doing that?

the same fact that schools are closing MBA programs (which are the best source of revenues for them) is an alarming fact
quote
Duncan

Full time MBAs are loss making and part time and online ones are not. What's alarming?

Full time MBAs are loss making and part time and online ones are not. What's alarming?
quote
Duncan

Are there any any schools that are actually out of the MBA market? Surely all business schools are larger but have more diverse portfolios.

Are there any any schools that are actually out of the MBA market? Surely all business schools are larger but have more diverse portfolios.
quote
George Pat...

Change in Visa policies in UK and US the last few years, and the rise of some decent universities in 3rd countries, contribute to a fall in MBA demand in the US and UK.

Also, record low unemployment with many good jobs available for grabs, increased the opportunity cost for many locals.

Change in Visa policies in UK and US the last few years, and the rise of some decent universities in 3rd countries, contribute to a fall in MBA demand in the US and UK.

Also, record low unemployment with many good jobs available for grabs, increased the opportunity cost for many locals.
quote
Duncan

If there was a fall in demand then it would be reflected by lower salaries and lower employment rates. Restrictions on hiring certainly distort the market but, broadly speaking, I am not sure the evidence shows a falling demand for the top schools' graduates.

If there was a fall in demand then it would be reflected by lower salaries and lower employment rates. Restrictions on hiring certainly distort the market but, broadly speaking, I am not sure the evidence shows a falling demand for the top schools' graduates.
quote
Duncan

What I do see is that MBA students have different interests. More are taking entrepreneurial options. So many things are at work.

What I do see is that MBA students have different interests. More are taking entrepreneurial options. So many things are at work.
quote

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