What is better? Cass Finance certificate or the MIT micromasters?


Yyttyu

The Cass certificate is about 8000 pounds. The MIT certificate is significantly cheaper. What do I do?

[Edited by Yyttyu on May 28, 2020]

The Cass certificate is about 8000 pounds. The MIT certificate is significantly cheaper. What do I do?
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Duncan

What are your goals?

What are your goals?
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Yyttyu

What are your goals?

Honestly, to switch to first score an internship in equities research and also fill in some time till everything gets normalised with the Covid. With the certificate I can continue on towards a master's at Cass and get an online msc finance 

[quote]What are your goals? [/quote]<div><br></div><div>Honestly, to switch to first score an internship in equities research and also fill in some time till everything gets normalised with the Covid. With the certificate I can continue on towards a master's at Cass and get an online msc finance&nbsp;</div>
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Duncan

With the MIT Micromasters you can also continue on to a master's in finance. I guess it comes down to whether you are targeting the UK or US. 

With the MIT Micromasters you can also continue on to a master's in finance. I guess it comes down to whether you are targeting the UK or US.&nbsp;
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Yyttyu

With the MIT Micromasters you can also continue on to a master's in finance. I guess it comes down to whether you are targeting the UK or US. 
Wow I didn't know that. What university can I continue the masters in after the micro masters? Would these online masters provide any traction in the respective job markets anyway? I was just planning on enhancing my skills but given an option I would choose the US or more likely Canada. 

[quote]With the MIT Micromasters you can also continue on to a master's in finance. I guess it comes down to whether you are targeting the UK or US.&nbsp; [/quote]<div>Wow I didn't know that. What university can I continue the masters in after the micro masters? Would these online masters provide any traction in the respective job markets anyway? I was just planning on enhancing my skills but given an option I would choose the US or more likely Canada.&nbsp;</div>
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Duncan

Read the website about the Micromasters. By the time the first cohort is graduating the initial partners will be public. I think you can expect Harvard's ALM in finance to be on the list, since is already accepts other Micromasters, and MIT itself. 

Read the website about the Micromasters. By the time the first cohort is graduating the initial partners will be public. I think you can expect Harvard's ALM in finance to be on the list, since is already accepts other Micromasters, and MIT itself.&nbsp;
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Duncan

The Micromasters gives a $20k discount on the MIT MiF, I see. However, since it is postponed, I would look at the Harvard ALM in finance. It's lower cost and more flexible. 

The Micromasters gives a $20k discount on the MIT MiF, I see. However, since it is postponed, I would look at the Harvard ALM in finance. It's lower cost and more flexible.&nbsp;
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Grooss

It seems to me that it all depends on what exactly you like more.

It seems to me that it all depends on what exactly you like more.
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Razors Edg...

It seems to me that it all depends on what exactly you like more.
I would say yes, this is true, but also which one would be more appropriate in terms of future career goals and growth. 

That you'd be able to apply the MIT program to an MiF is a great incentive. 

[quote]It seems to me that it all depends on what exactly you like more. [/quote]<div>I would say yes, this is true, but also which one would be more appropriate in terms of future career goals and growth.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>That you'd be able to apply the MIT program to an MiF is a great incentive.&nbsp;</div>
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smartcanad...

Because of the availability of MOOC certificates, the value of certificates on a resume has plummeted.  Everyone and their mother seems to have a "Harvard" or "MIT" edX certificate on LinkedIn these days.   These unfairly devalue "real" graduate certificates that are rigorous and a "step" towards the masters.  To be honest, I have several certificates as well but I do not list those on my resume.  I feel employers value microsoft/IBM or SAS certifications a lot more than MOOCs.    

Today, the value of a certificate is primarily (1) adding skills/knowledge and (2) credits that can be used for pursuing a masters.  If your end-goal is to get a masters from Cass, then the graduate certificate from Cass might be the better option.  However, if the goal is to boost your resume/CV and employment prospects, the $ amount you spend on the Cass certificate will not be worth it.  

[Edited by smartcanada on Jun 05, 2020]

Because of the availability of MOOC certificates, the value of certificates on a resume has plummeted.&nbsp; Everyone and their mother seems to have a "Harvard" or "MIT" edX certificate on LinkedIn these days.&nbsp; &nbsp;These unfairly devalue "real" graduate certificates that are rigorous and a "step" towards the masters.&nbsp; To be honest, I have several certificates as well but I do not list those on my resume.&nbsp; I feel employers value microsoft/IBM or SAS certifications a lot more than MOOCs.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Today, the value of a certificate is primarily (1) adding skills/knowledge and (2) credits that can be used for pursuing a masters.&nbsp; If your end-goal is to get a masters from Cass, then the graduate certificate from Cass might be the better option.&nbsp; However, if the goal is to boost your resume/CV and employment prospects, the $ amount you spend on the Cass certificate will not be worth it.&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
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Duncan

I think you have to put this in the context already given. This person isn't considering a certificate as a way of boosting their CV, but as a way of gaining academic credit to accelerate their path towards a masters in finance. Naturally, there's a big difference between the value of different certificates to them: 99.9% of MOOC certificates don't lead to academic credit and have no meaningful assessment, but the options this person is considering do. 

I think you have to put this in the context already given. This person isn't considering a certificate as a way of boosting their CV, but as a way of gaining academic credit to accelerate their path towards a masters in finance. Naturally, there's a big difference between the value of different certificates to them: 99.9% of MOOC certificates don't lead to academic credit and have no meaningful assessment, but the options this person is considering do.&nbsp;
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Yyttyu

I think you have to put this in the context already given. This person isn't considering a certificate as a way of boosting their CV, but as a way of gaining academic credit to accelerate their path towards a masters in finance. Naturally, there's a big difference between the value of different certificates to them: 99.9% of MOOC certificates don't lead to academic credit and have no meaningful assessment, but the options this person is considering do. 

I think the Cass certificate is very different from edx or coursera professional certificates. The Cass certificate is essentially 4 masters level courses rather than the non credit courses from coursera. I can list them on my CV as graduate coursework undertaken from Cass, if I’m not mistaken. However I was wondering if anyone in my country (India) would actually recognise Cass as a good business school? I do want to switch to finance from strategy and have only about 14 months of work experience including some in analytics and finance. 

[quote]I think you have to put this in the context already given. This person isn't considering a certificate as a way of boosting their CV, but as a way of gaining academic credit to accelerate their path towards a masters in finance. Naturally, there's a big difference between the value of different certificates to them: 99.9% of MOOC certificates don't lead to academic credit and have no meaningful assessment, but the options this person is considering do.&nbsp; [/quote]<div><br></div><div>I think the Cass certificate is very different from edx or coursera professional certificates. The Cass certificate is essentially 4 masters level courses rather than the non credit courses from coursera. I can list them on my CV as graduate coursework undertaken from Cass, if I’m not mistaken. However I was wondering if anyone in my country (India) would actually recognise Cass as a good business school? I do want to switch to finance from strategy and have only about 14 months of work experience including some in analytics and finance.&nbsp;</div>
quote
Yyttyu

Because of the availability of MOOC certificates, the value of certificates on a resume has plummeted.  Everyone and their mother seems to have a "Harvard" or "MIT" edX certificate on LinkedIn these days.   These unfairly devalue "real" graduate certificates that are rigorous and a "step" towards the masters.  To be honest, I have several certificates as well but I do not list those on my resume.  I feel employers value microsoft/IBM or SAS certifications a lot more than MOOCs.    

Today, the value of a certificate is primarily (1) adding skills/knowledge and (2) credits that can be used for pursuing a masters.  If your end-goal is to get a masters from Cass, then the graduate certificate from Cass might be the better option.  However, if the goal is to boost your resume/CV and employment prospects, the $ amount you spend on the Cass certificate will not be worth it.  
I agree that everyone has Harvard or Wharton online courses listed on their CV but I just mention them in the extras and only mention coursera or edx without mentioning the institution. I have offers from management consulting UCD, finance SMU, nova and polimi but feel Cass is a safer choice in terms of money. 

[quote]Because of the availability of MOOC certificates, the value of certificates on a resume has plummeted.&nbsp; Everyone and their mother seems to have a "Harvard" or "MIT" edX certificate on LinkedIn these days.&nbsp; &nbsp;These unfairly devalue "real" graduate certificates that are rigorous and a "step" towards the masters.&nbsp; To be honest, I have several certificates as well but I do not list those on my resume.&nbsp; I feel employers value microsoft/IBM or SAS certifications a lot more than MOOCs.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Today, the value of a certificate is primarily (1) adding skills/knowledge and (2) credits that can be used for pursuing a masters.&nbsp; If your end-goal is to get a masters from Cass, then the graduate certificate from Cass might be the better option.&nbsp; However, if the goal is to boost your resume/CV and employment prospects, the $ amount you spend on the Cass certificate will not be worth it.&nbsp;&nbsp;</div> [/quote]<div>I agree that everyone has Harvard or Wharton online courses listed on their CV but I just mention them in the extras and only mention coursera or edx without mentioning the institution. I have offers from management consulting UCD, finance SMU, nova and polimi but feel Cass is a safer choice in terms of money.&nbsp;</div>
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