The Right MBA


Hello everyone,

Before I begin with my questions, I would really like to mention that you have a great forum running here. I could find a lot of helpful information in different topics on the board, and great guidance by some senior members around. Thanks a lot for all of that.

Now, let me give a brief insight into my requirements and the reason why I am here.

I am an engineer by qualification (Bachelor of Tech, Computer Science, India) and an entrepreneur by profession. Immediately after my education, i established a business revolving around online marketing, SEO and the works. Now, after about 3 years, i would really like to get into the business angle of it all, in depth. Marketing and general management education, even finances and accounting, are the areas i am interested in.

-I need an MBA that helps me with the above target, but one which also leaves me with some options in the job market open. I might have to work in the same country after MBA, for recovering the costs and for keeping my options open, so employment and placements are important.

-I would prefer a cheaper course, but not any random B-school would do. Warsaw Business School, CEU, UC3M, MSM Netherlands, HFU Germany are some schools i think might fit the above requirements. By the way, how is MSM Netherlands? and HFU Germany?

-Another preference would be a 1 year MBA, though that is not a strict requirement.

-Another requirement, which might appear interesting to some, is the possibility of working in the same country for a few years, and possibly settling there permanently. Countries where you can get employment easily, along with a PR or something, on the same lines.

I would be having 3 years of experience in about 4 months from now. I have given TOEFL and have scored 115, haven't given GMAT yet but can plan that in a couple of months.

So, based on all of the above, please provide me with some suggestions as i am in a really confused state at the moment.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!

Hello everyone,

Before I begin with my questions, I would really like to mention that you have a great forum running here. I could find a lot of helpful information in different topics on the board, and great guidance by some senior members around. Thanks a lot for all of that.

Now, let me give a brief insight into my requirements and the reason why I am here.

I am an engineer by qualification (Bachelor of Tech, Computer Science, India) and an entrepreneur by profession. Immediately after my education, i established a business revolving around online marketing, SEO and the works. Now, after about 3 years, i would really like to get into the business angle of it all, in depth. Marketing and general management education, even finances and accounting, are the areas i am interested in.

-I need an MBA that helps me with the above target, but one which also leaves me with some options in the job market open. I might have to work in the same country after MBA, for recovering the costs and for keeping my options open, so employment and placements are important.

-I would prefer a cheaper course, but not any random B-school would do. Warsaw Business School, CEU, UC3M, MSM Netherlands, HFU Germany are some schools i think might fit the above requirements. By the way, how is MSM Netherlands? and HFU Germany?

-Another preference would be a 1 year MBA, though that is not a strict requirement.

-Another requirement, which might appear interesting to some, is the possibility of working in the same country for a few years, and possibly settling there permanently. Countries where you can get employment easily, along with a PR or something, on the same lines.

I would be having 3 years of experience in about 4 months from now. I have given TOEFL and have scored 115, haven't given GMAT yet but can plan that in a couple of months.

So, based on all of the above, please provide me with some suggestions as i am in a really confused state at the moment.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!
quote
ralph

Hello everyone,

Before I begin with my questions, I would really like to mention that you have a great forum running here. I could find a lot of helpful information in different topics on the board, and great guidance by some senior members around. Thanks a lot for all of that.

Welcome to the forum! As you probably realize by having read some posts here, your profile is a very competitive one. However, I think that your entrepreneurial experience gives you a substantial edge, because not many Indians with IT backgrounds have experienced what it's like to start and run their own businesses. Definitely use this to your advantage by referencing insights from this experience in your admissions essays.

I need an MBA that helps me with the above target, but one which also leaves me with some options in the job market open. I might have to work in the same country after MBA, for recovering the costs and for keeping my options open, so employment and placements are important.

I think you should narrow your options by geography and potentially specialization. Where would you like to end up? You should definitely research visa and employment issues, but you might have more luck at schools in Eastern Bloc countries (CEU is a great deal,) and Canada (HEC Montreal, Rotman.) Also, consider China/Hong Kong (CEIBS, CUHK;) or even Latin America (FIA.)

I don't know if you are planning on continuing to create new businesses, but if you are, check out schools in places that have innovation infrastructures (Haas, Harvard.) Honestly, the US is where good programs in entrepreneurship are - but are generally going to be more expensive than the other programs I mentioned.

A good GMAT score is essential - so I'd recommend taking practice tests to see where you stand and then figuring out if you need tutoring or another kind of prep.

<blockquote>Hello everyone,

Before I begin with my questions, I would really like to mention that you have a great forum running here. I could find a lot of helpful information in different topics on the board, and great guidance by some senior members around. Thanks a lot for all of that.</blockquote>
Welcome to the forum! As you probably realize by having read some posts here, your profile is a very competitive one. However, I think that your entrepreneurial experience gives you a substantial edge, because not many Indians with IT backgrounds have experienced what it's like to start and run their own businesses. Definitely use this to your advantage by referencing insights from this experience in your admissions essays.

<blockquote>I need an MBA that helps me with the above target, but one which also leaves me with some options in the job market open. I might have to work in the same country after MBA, for recovering the costs and for keeping my options open, so employment and placements are important.</blockquote>
I think you should narrow your options by geography and potentially specialization. Where would you like to end up? You should definitely research visa and employment issues, but you might have more luck at schools in Eastern Bloc countries (CEU is a great deal,) and Canada (HEC Montreal, Rotman.) Also, consider China/Hong Kong (CEIBS, CUHK;) or even Latin America (FIA.)

I don't know if you are planning on continuing to create new businesses, but if you are, check out schools in places that have innovation infrastructures (Haas, Harvard.) Honestly, the US is where good programs in entrepreneurship are - but are generally going to be more expensive than the other programs I mentioned.

A good GMAT score is essential - so I'd recommend taking practice tests to see where you stand and then figuring out if you need tutoring or another kind of prep.
quote

Welcome to the forum! As you probably realize by having read some posts here, your profile is a very competitive one. However, I think that your entrepreneurial experience gives you a substantial edge, because not many Indians with IT backgrounds have experienced what it's like to start and run their own businesses. Definitely use this to your advantage by referencing insights from this experience in your admissions essays.


Hello Ralph, thanks a lot for your encouraging words. I was laboring under the impression that it is an average profile and i should not be targeting top schools. But now that i think about it, i should plan something about them too.



I think you should narrow your options by geography and potentially specialization. Where would you like to end up? You should definitely research visa and employment issues, but you might have more luck at schools in Eastern Bloc countries (CEU is a great deal,) and Canada (HEC Montreal, Rotman.) Also, consider China/Hong Kong (CEIBS, CUHK;) or even Latin America (FIA.)


I have been hearing a lot about the Eastern Bloc, but i am extremely skeptical about the language issues and employment there. Same goes for HK and China too, havent heard much about FIA. Plus, about landing up, I am trying to highlight places where getting a work permit, visa and citizenship(after some time) is not that big a hassle. Any suggestions from your side in this regard?

<blockquote>Welcome to the forum! As you probably realize by having read some posts here, your profile is a very competitive one. However, I think that your entrepreneurial experience gives you a substantial edge, because not many Indians with IT backgrounds have experienced what it's like to start and run their own businesses. Definitely use this to your advantage by referencing insights from this experience in your admissions essays.</blockquote>

Hello Ralph, thanks a lot for your encouraging words. I was laboring under the impression that it is an average profile and i should not be targeting top schools. But now that i think about it, i should plan something about them too.


<blockquote>
I think you should narrow your options by geography and potentially specialization. Where would you like to end up? You should definitely research visa and employment issues, but you might have more luck at schools in Eastern Bloc countries (CEU is a great deal,) and Canada (HEC Montreal, Rotman.) Also, consider China/Hong Kong (CEIBS, CUHK;) or even Latin America (FIA.)</blockquote>

I have been hearing a lot about the Eastern Bloc, but i am extremely skeptical about the language issues and employment there. Same goes for HK and China too, havent heard much about FIA. Plus, about landing up, I am trying to highlight places where getting a work permit, visa and citizenship(after some time) is not that big a hassle. Any suggestions from your side in this regard?

quote
ralph

Well, it's sort of a tradeoff. As you're probably aware, international grads are having a much harder time with visa issues in the UK, western Europe, and the States, so your likelihood of getting a job in those places is lower, especially if you end up in a lower cost program.

Getting a visa in those places I mentioned will generally be much easier for international students. Going to school in a BRIC country or a developing region has some drawbacks (language and culture learning curves, for instance,) but you could be at the ground floor for substantial career growth.

Getting a visa in Canada will also be easier than western Europe/UK/US, but success in career placement will depend on a number of things: industry, your English or French skills, etc.

I have been hearing a lot about the Eastern Bloc, but i am extremely skeptical about the language issues and employment there. Same goes for HK and China too, havent heard much about FIA. Plus, about landing up, I am trying to highlight places where getting a work permit, visa and citizenship(after some time) is not that big a hassle. Any suggestions from your side in this regard?

Well, it's sort of a tradeoff. As you're probably aware, international grads are having a much harder time with visa issues in the UK, western Europe, and the States, so your likelihood of getting a job in those places is lower, especially if you end up in a lower cost program.

Getting a visa in those places I mentioned will generally be much easier for international students. Going to school in a BRIC country or a developing region has some drawbacks (language and culture learning curves, for instance,) but you could be at the ground floor for substantial career growth.

Getting a visa in Canada will also be easier than western Europe/UK/US, but success in career placement will depend on a number of things: industry, your English or French skills, etc.

<blockquote>I have been hearing a lot about the Eastern Bloc, but i am extremely skeptical about the language issues and employment there. Same goes for HK and China too, havent heard much about FIA. Plus, about landing up, I am trying to highlight places where getting a work permit, visa and citizenship(after some time) is not that big a hassle. Any suggestions from your side in this regard?

</blockquote>
quote

Yes, I have definitely heard that things are not smooth in UK, US and W Europe anymore. How about Australia, how are things going that side?

On a different note, how is the employment post-MBA in Eastern Europe and Brazil. Are Brazilian firms enthusiastic about hiring international students after MBA? Frankly, the BRIC concept is appealing to me, especially B and R, but the employment looks like a gamble at the moment.

Yes, I have definitely heard that things are not smooth in UK, US and W Europe anymore. How about Australia, how are things going that side?

On a different note, how is the employment post-MBA in Eastern Europe and Brazil. Are Brazilian firms enthusiastic about hiring international students after MBA? Frankly, the BRIC concept is appealing to me, especially B and R, but the employment looks like a gamble at the moment.
quote
JayA

I have a friend studing at Warsaw University of Technology. He is really happy about it. Especially about the special workshops, very interactive.Now they start business projects in companies with Cass BS London. Now I'm living in Paris but next year I will take into consideration to study MBA in Eastern Europe. Better value for mony than MBA in Paris .

I have a friend studing at Warsaw University of Technology. He is really happy about it. Especially about the special workshops, very interactive.Now they start business projects in companies with Cass BS London. Now I'm living in Paris but next year I will take into consideration to study MBA in Eastern Europe. Better value for mony than MBA in Paris .

quote
ralph

Yes, I have definitely heard that things are not smooth in UK, US and W Europe anymore. How about Australia, how are things going that side?

From what I hear, both Australia and New Zealand are doing ok - but they're generally small markets so there aren't tons of jobs. Plus, Australia is a big country so I'd think you want to study in the city where you want to end up.

On a different note, how is the employment post-MBA in Eastern Europe and Brazil. Are Brazilian firms enthusiastic about hiring international students after MBA?


I think the key in each place is to understand the language and culture differences. Even though a lot of businesses do conduct business in English in Brazil, for example - you're going to need a command of Portuguese for day-to-day interactions. Similarly in Russia, from what I understand.

Ideally, this will be something that comes with studying there and making a conscious and direct effort to learn the language. And you're also going to want to make an effort to network and build relationships with the corporations you're targeting.

I guess the short story is that companies in BRIC countries are not just handing jobs out to foreign nationals because they do their MBAs there - but with some dedicated effort, there are jobs for those who want them.

<blockquote>Yes, I have definitely heard that things are not smooth in UK, US and W Europe anymore. How about Australia, how are things going that side?
</blockquote>
From what I hear, both Australia and New Zealand are doing ok - but they're generally small markets so there aren't tons of jobs. Plus, Australia is a big country so I'd think you want to study in the city where you want to end up.

<blockquote>On a different note, how is the employment post-MBA in Eastern Europe and Brazil. Are Brazilian firms enthusiastic about hiring international students after MBA?</blockquote>

I think the key in each place is to understand the language and culture differences. Even though a lot of businesses do conduct business in English in Brazil, for example - you're going to need a command of Portuguese for day-to-day interactions. Similarly in Russia, from what I understand.

Ideally, this will be something that comes with studying there and making a conscious and direct effort to learn the language. And you're also going to want to make an effort to network and build relationships with the corporations you're targeting.

I guess the short story is that companies in BRIC countries are not just handing jobs out to foreign nationals because they do their MBAs there - but with some dedicated effort, there are jobs for those who want them.
quote

Thanks for the quick reply!

Wouldn't 4 years of entrepreneurship help me in sealing the deal at ISB?

And how would Rotman and Ivey see my profile, very competitive or the regular fare?

Thanks for the quick reply!

Wouldn't 4 years of entrepreneurship help me in sealing the deal at ISB?

And how would Rotman and Ivey see my profile, very competitive or the regular fare?

quote
Duncan

I think you can do your own research into the average GMAT an work experience scores. You are looking at really competitive schools: Ivey is the 'Harvard of the North' and Rotman has stellar faculty and alumni connections. You'll find Rotman easier for admission than Ivey and, frankly, I think you'll find it a better fit with your goals and background.

Your GMAT will be interesting for them, but look carefully at how your background and work experience will come across to them. There is no shortage of Indian IT and engineers with poor soft skills and weak verbal acuity in English.

Different entrepreneurs have different experiences. Ivey looks for strong leadership experience. Some entrepreneurs work more or less by themselves or administer in a very functional and administrative way.

I think you can do your own research into the average GMAT an work experience scores. You are looking at really competitive schools: Ivey is the 'Harvard of the North' and Rotman has stellar faculty and alumni connections. You'll find Rotman easier for admission than Ivey and, frankly, I think you'll find it a better fit with your goals and background.

Your GMAT will be interesting for them, but look carefully at how your background and work experience will come across to them. There is no shortage of Indian IT and engineers with poor soft skills and weak verbal acuity in English.

Different entrepreneurs have different experiences. Ivey looks for strong leadership experience. Some entrepreneurs work more or less by themselves or administer in a very functional and administrative way.
quote

Yes, I definitely understand that the schools I am looking at are quite competitive. I think it would all boil down to how I project the various aspects of my profile and present a powerful application.

Thanks for your valuable suggestions Duncan!

Yes, I definitely understand that the schools I am looking at are quite competitive. I think it would all boil down to how I project the various aspects of my profile and present a powerful application.

Thanks for your valuable suggestions Duncan!

quote

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