The Buzz regarding entrepreneur specialization


Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.

Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.
quote
BigD

What is the "BUZZ" ? Is it the slang term for excitement or does it represent a brand or even course or something?

There is a lot more to entrepreneurship and innovation than simply being the guy with an idea; or even the guy that develops the idea. Large companies have huge resources invested in (open and closed) innovation networks and development and management of the innovation process. Check out the P+G well known paper called "Connect and Develop" to give you some ideas how things are managed in progressive blue-chips.

The skills you would learn in the specialism would not just be writing a business plan and IDEO-style brainstorming.

From the tone of your post I suspect you want to hedge your bets in case your great ambition doesn't work out and you have to get a job working for da Man.

Personally I think it is good knowledge to have as part of your business education even if you remain in the human bondage that is employment.

BigD

Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.

What is the "BUZZ" ? Is it the slang term for excitement or does it represent a brand or even course or something?

There is a lot more to entrepreneurship and innovation than simply being the guy with an idea; or even the guy that develops the idea. Large companies have huge resources invested in (open and closed) innovation networks and development and management of the innovation process. Check out the P+G well known paper called "Connect and Develop" to give you some ideas how things are managed in progressive blue-chips.

The skills you would learn in the specialism would not just be writing a business plan and IDEO-style brainstorming.

From the tone of your post I suspect you want to hedge your bets in case your great ambition doesn't work out and you have to get a job working for da Man.

Personally I think it is good knowledge to have as part of your business education even if you remain in the human bondage that is employment.

BigD

<blockquote>Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.
</blockquote>
quote

Thanks for the reply and your input BigD even though you sound like an employee of a business school with entrepreneurship stream!
Of course it is important for anyone who is thinking of an MBA regardless of specialization to consider the cons and pros of a given specialization. But I am not the one who is going to study an MBA with such specialization to be honest. I became more and more curious because I have seen many schools to promote it and wanted to know why such a promotion now when the economy is as it is!
However, I really think how would a headhunter agency think of someone with an MBA with entrepreneurial and innovation specialization? Or how would a major company think about hiring one?
Working for ?DA Man? or ?Not Da man? comes after because as an employee you have the opportunity to choose who or which company you want to work for.
Jungledrumer

Thanks for the reply and your input BigD even though you sound like an employee of a business school with entrepreneurship stream!
Of course it is important for anyone who is thinking of an MBA regardless of specialization to consider the cons and pros of a given specialization. But I am not the one who is going to study an MBA with such specialization to be honest. I became more and more curious because I have seen many schools to promote it and wanted to know why such a promotion now when the economy is as it is!
However, I really think how would a headhunter agency think of someone with an MBA with entrepreneurial and innovation specialization? Or how would a major company think about hiring one?
Working for ?DA Man? or ?Not Da man? comes after because as an employee you have the opportunity to choose who or which company you want to work for.
Jungledrumer
quote
BigD

I'm not working for a business school, but I have studied innovation and entrepreneurship, but more a blue-chip than start-up perspective.

I don't know why the specialism is so fashionable at the moment, but I can see your point. I don't think I would choose an MBA that had entrepreneurship in the title for the reasons you have mentioned, although you can obviously omit it. it really depends how dominant your MBA activity is at your interview.

It is up to you how you pitch the content of your course and the emphasis should be tailored to the employer in any case.

If there is a _mandatory_ entrepreneurial project as part of your course then it becomes a bit more complicated if your interviewer has your transcripts to hand...modules titles like "socking it to da Man" and "going it alone" or "being your own boss" would not endear themselves to employers such as Flywheel,Shyster and Flywheel.

BigD

Thanks for the reply and your input BigD even though you sound like an employee of a business school with entrepreneurship stream!
Of course it is important for anyone who is thinking of an MBA regardless of specialization to consider the cons and pros of a given specialization. But I am not the one who is going to study an MBA with such specialization to be honest. I became more and more curious because I have seen many schools to promote it and wanted to know why such a promotion now when the economy is as it is!
However, I really think how would a headhunter agency think of someone with an MBA with entrepreneurial and innovation specialization? Or how would a major company think about hiring one?
Working for ?DA Man? or ?Not Da man? comes after because as an employee you have the opportunity to choose who or which company you want to work for.
Jungledrumer

I'm not working for a business school, but I have studied innovation and entrepreneurship, but more a blue-chip than start-up perspective.

I don't know why the specialism is so fashionable at the moment, but I can see your point. I don't think I would choose an MBA that had entrepreneurship in the title for the reasons you have mentioned, although you can obviously omit it. it really depends how dominant your MBA activity is at your interview.

It is up to you how you pitch the content of your course and the emphasis should be tailored to the employer in any case.

If there is a _mandatory_ entrepreneurial project as part of your course then it becomes a bit more complicated if your interviewer has your transcripts to hand...modules titles like "socking it to da Man" and "going it alone" or "being your own boss" would not endear themselves to employers such as Flywheel,Shyster and Flywheel.

BigD

<blockquote>Thanks for the reply and your input BigD even though you sound like an employee of a business school with entrepreneurship stream!
Of course it is important for anyone who is thinking of an MBA regardless of specialization to consider the cons and pros of a given specialization. But I am not the one who is going to study an MBA with such specialization to be honest. I became more and more curious because I have seen many schools to promote it and wanted to know why such a promotion now when the economy is as it is!
However, I really think how would a headhunter agency think of someone with an MBA with entrepreneurial and innovation specialization? Or how would a major company think about hiring one?
Working for ?DA Man? or ?Not Da man? comes after because as an employee you have the opportunity to choose who or which company you want to work for.
Jungledrumer
</blockquote>
quote
ezra

This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education.

I honestly think that this is a shift based on demographic-fueled demands. Who's starting new businesses? They're young (20s to early 30s) and predominantly male. That population closely aligns with most MBA cohorts, so it's no surprise to me that business schools are making these programs more robust.
Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that.

I'd imagine that many of their new businesses do not succeed - but in this space, that's much different from failure. Many entrepreneurs will start 6, 10, even 12 ventures before one takes off. From Ben Franklin to Steve Jobs, that's how the game has been played.

Here's the thing: What's good about MBA programs with robust entrepreneurship offerings is that they provide infrastructure to help get new businesses off the ground. Think of Berkeley - Haas' deep connections to Silicon Valley - that's a great network that can help foster the success of new ventures. Likewise, Columbia just opened a new center that will provide recent grads with office space in Manhattan and other resources, along with a built-in network of like-minded people. I'd argue that these elements are the most important factors in creating new businesses - beyond curriculum specialized in writing a good business plan, chasing venture capital, etc.
At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs!

No, the definition of an entrepreneur is one who starts his own business, not somebody who gets hired. :)

<blockquote>This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education.</blockquote>
I honestly think that this is a shift based on demographic-fueled demands. Who's starting new businesses? They're young (20s to early 30s) and predominantly male. That population closely aligns with most MBA cohorts, so it's no surprise to me that business schools are making these programs more robust.
<blockquote>Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that.</blockquote>
I'd imagine that many of their new businesses do not succeed - but in this space, that's much different from failure. Many entrepreneurs will start 6, 10, even 12 ventures before one takes off. From Ben Franklin to Steve Jobs, that's how the game has been played.

Here's the thing: What's good about MBA programs with robust entrepreneurship offerings is that they provide infrastructure to help get new businesses off the ground. Think of Berkeley - Haas' deep connections to Silicon Valley - that's a great network that can help foster the success of new ventures. Likewise, Columbia just opened a new center that will provide recent grads with office space in Manhattan and other resources, along with a built-in network of like-minded people. I'd argue that these elements are the most important factors in creating new businesses - beyond curriculum specialized in writing a good business plan, chasing venture capital, etc.
<blockquote>At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs!</blockquote>
No, the definition of an entrepreneur is one who starts his own business, not somebody who gets hired. :)
quote

Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.


The buzz is huge. Even Havard recently joined the club and Stanford released some stats that showed that an increasing number of their graduates from last year. To give some stats about EMLYON business school which places a huge emphasis on entrepreneurship, around 96% of their graduates are employed in one entrepreneurial capacity or the other. This could be in business development roles at companies or at start-up. An interesting stat to see would be one that measure how many of the businesses that graduates started survived say 5 years down the line, how well they are doing and maybe comparing this to students who start businesses but did not get an "entrepreneurial mba"(they also do not have had to start these businesses right after graduating). I tried to ask the EMLYON for these stats and they say they are currently working on it.

<blockquote>Hi,
I am asking this question to acquire information about the benefit(s) of entrepreneur stream at various business schools. Because recently I see a trend amongst the major business schools to promote entrepreneurship and innovation as specialized streams at their MBA program(s). At the same time I have read here that companies do not hire entrepreneurs! This makes one wonder about the BUZZ regarding entrepreneurship and innovation as a specialization in MBA education. Do really all the students become successful entrepreneurs? I seriously doubt that. Then my question is: are the rest of who have not become successful entrepreneurs unemployed since according to some the firms/companies do not employ entrepreneurs?
I would really appreciate your input.
</blockquote>

The buzz is huge. Even Havard recently joined the club and Stanford released some stats that showed that an increasing number of their graduates from last year. To give some stats about EMLYON business school which places a huge emphasis on entrepreneurship, around 96% of their graduates are employed in one entrepreneurial capacity or the other. This could be in business development roles at companies or at start-up. An interesting stat to see would be one that measure how many of the businesses that graduates started survived say 5 years down the line, how well they are doing and maybe comparing this to students who start businesses but did not get an "entrepreneurial mba"(they also do not have had to start these businesses right after graduating). I tried to ask the EMLYON for these stats and they say they are currently working on it.
quote
Duncan

It is quite nonsensical to say...

To give some stats about EMLYON business school which places a huge emphasis on entrepreneurship, around 96% of their graduates are employed in one entrepreneurial capacity or the other.


Business development (i.e. selling) is not entrepreneurship, but LinkedIn shows 835 EMLyon graduates in bizdev and 393 as entrepreneurs (of 15,668). Certainly that is a large enough sample to give a clue about the total.

EMLyon doesn't publish detailed placement data, and examine any statement from them about placement critically.

It is quite nonsensical to say...
<blockquote>To give some stats about EMLYON business school which places a huge emphasis on entrepreneurship, around 96% of their graduates are employed in one entrepreneurial capacity or the other. </blockquote>

Business development (i.e. selling) is not entrepreneurship, but LinkedIn shows 835 EMLyon graduates in bizdev and 393 as entrepreneurs (of 15,668). Certainly that is a large enough sample to give a clue about the total.

EMLyon doesn't publish detailed placement data, and examine any statement from them about placement critically.
quote
ezra

Business development (i.e. selling) is not entrepreneurship, but LinkedIn shows 835 EMLyon graduates in bizdev and 393 as entrepreneurs (of 15,668). Certainly that is a large enough sample to give a clue about the total.

I don't know if these stats are a good indication of outcomes from the school - because certainly a successful entrepreneur wouldn't list himself as either in business development or as an entrepreneur (he'd probably be a "business owner," or a CEO, if he started something successfully.

But this is the fundamental problem with gauging the strength of an entrepreneurship program - you just don't know how effective it is unless the school provides more information.

That said, Lyon is probably a good place geographically for entrepreneurs. There's a lot of technology, biotech, and pharmaceutical companies in the region - a good sign for fertile VC activity.

EMLyon doesn't publish detailed placement data, and examine any statement from them about placement critically.

Agreed.

<blockquote>Business development (i.e. selling) is not entrepreneurship, but LinkedIn shows 835 EMLyon graduates in bizdev and 393 as entrepreneurs (of 15,668). Certainly that is a large enough sample to give a clue about the total.</blockquote>
I don't know if these stats are a good indication of outcomes from the school - because certainly a successful entrepreneur wouldn't list himself as either in business development or as an entrepreneur (he'd probably be a "business owner," or a CEO, if he started something successfully.

But this is the fundamental problem with gauging the strength of an entrepreneurship program - you just don't know how effective it is unless the school provides more information.

That said, Lyon is probably a good place geographically for entrepreneurs. There's a lot of technology, biotech, and pharmaceutical companies in the region - a good sign for fertile VC activity.

<blockquote>EMLyon doesn't publish detailed placement data, and examine any statement from them about placement critically.</blockquote>
Agreed.
quote

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