New FT ranking out today


Duncan

The FT's new executive education rankings came out today. They have a combined ranking to show the winners in both the open and custom programme categories. You can download the top 50 at: http://on.ft.com/J53SJT

The top 25 are: Harvard; HEC; IMD; CL; IESE; FDC; Easde; Thunderbird; Insead; Essec; Pennsylvania; LBS; Northwestern; IE; Oxford; Cranfield; Western Ontario; Chicago; Virginia; MIT; Columbia; Ipade; Stanford; Bocconi and Ashridge.

It's an interesting ranking, and it's one way to see which schools have a extra form of leverage with employers. Schools that employers turn to for training their own people have a good chance of being the go-to schools for MBAs as well.

Of course there are many things are work in this ranking. Many of the schools are national leaders in countries where there is a strong commitment to developing leaders: CCL; FDC; ESSEC; LBS and so on. But, it suggests to me that schools that well do well in this ranking should have MBA programmes on the way up (especially, I am thinking of European school like Essec, HEC, Esade, Cranfield, Bocconi and Ashridge) when the recession eases. Some of the strong performers in the top 50 have launched or relaunched their MBA in the last several years (Essec, Ashridge, ESMT, Henley, Catolica) and those schools which are part of universities but don't have a full-time MBA (like ESCP, Helsinki and SSE) must be tempted to launch them, perhaps in joint ventures with schools in other regions.

The FT's new executive education rankings came out today. They have a combined ranking to show the winners in both the open and custom programme categories. You can download the top 50 at: http://on.ft.com/J53SJT

The top 25 are: Harvard; HEC; IMD; CL; IESE; FDC; Easde; Thunderbird; Insead; Essec; Pennsylvania; LBS; Northwestern; IE; Oxford; Cranfield; Western Ontario; Chicago; Virginia; MIT; Columbia; Ipade; Stanford; Bocconi and Ashridge.

It's an interesting ranking, and it's one way to see which schools have a extra form of leverage with employers. Schools that employers turn to for training their own people have a good chance of being the go-to schools for MBAs as well.

Of course there are many things are work in this ranking. Many of the schools are national leaders in countries where there is a strong commitment to developing leaders: CCL; FDC; ESSEC; LBS and so on. But, it suggests to me that schools that well do well in this ranking should have MBA programmes on the way up (especially, I am thinking of European school like Essec, HEC, Esade, Cranfield, Bocconi and Ashridge) when the recession eases. Some of the strong performers in the top 50 have launched or relaunched their MBA in the last several years (Essec, Ashridge, ESMT, Henley, Catolica) and those schools which are part of universities but don't have a full-time MBA (like ESCP, Helsinki and SSE) must be tempted to launch them, perhaps in joint ventures with schools in other regions.
quote
ralph

Thanks, Duncan - your comments on this ranking are really interesting.

Schools that employers turn to for training their own people have a good chance of being the go-to schools for MBAs as well.

This is true, and something that MBA potentials should pay attention to. For example, some of IESE's top executive education clients include Nestlé, Abbott, Airbus, and Novartis. It's no coincidence that IESE also hosts recruiting events with these companies in attendance. Darden has similar relationships with companies like AES Corp, Bank of America, and Intel, among others.

Many of the schools are national leaders in countries where there is a strong commitment to developing leaders: CCL; FDC; ESSEC; LBS and so on.

And also I'd note that schools in developing countries (or those who have partnerships with schools in developing countries,) are starting to rise: Harvard's exec ed program has a solid foothold in China; there are two schools from Brazil now (FDC and Insper,) etc. I have a feeling there will be more next year as well.

...those schools which are part of universities but don't have a full-time MBA (like ESCP, Helsinki and SSE) must be tempted to launch them, perhaps in joint ventures with schools in other regions.

It's really strange that ESCP doesn't have a full-time program. I'm sure they could fill cohorts without even trying.

Thanks, Duncan - your comments on this ranking are really interesting.

<blockquote>Schools that employers turn to for training their own people have a good chance of being the go-to schools for MBAs as well.</blockquote>
This is true, and something that MBA potentials should pay attention to. For example, some of IESE's top executive education clients include Nestlé, Abbott, Airbus, and Novartis. It's no coincidence that IESE also hosts recruiting events with these companies in attendance. Darden has similar relationships with companies like AES Corp, Bank of America, and Intel, among others.

<blockquote>Many of the schools are national leaders in countries where there is a strong commitment to developing leaders: CCL; FDC; ESSEC; LBS and so on.</blockquote>
And also I'd note that schools in developing countries (or those who have partnerships with schools in developing countries,) are starting to rise: Harvard's exec ed program has a solid foothold in China; there are two schools from Brazil now (FDC and Insper,) etc. I have a feeling there will be more next year as well.

<blockquote>...those schools which are part of universities but don't have a full-time MBA (like ESCP, Helsinki and SSE) must be tempted to launch them, perhaps in joint ventures with schools in other regions.</blockquote>
It's really strange that ESCP doesn't have a full-time program. I'm sure they could fill cohorts without even trying.
quote
Duncan

I think the challenge is to fit it into the labour markets they focus on. What ESCP has done very well, since closing the full-time EAP MBA, is cornered the market for post-MSc advanced masters. I wonder if they could wrap those up into an MBA in some way?

I think the challenge is to fit it into the labour markets they focus on. What ESCP has done very well, since closing the full-time EAP MBA, is cornered the market for post-MSc advanced masters. I wonder if they could wrap those up into an MBA in some way?
quote
ralph

I wonder if they could wrap those up into an MBA in some way?

I'm sure they could. The key would be to develop curriculum that fits in the niche between the MEB program and the EMBA, and includes an internship or hands-on project component. They certainly have the faculty to do it - and with their connections to employers through their executive education program, they'd have a recruitment base. I'd probably bump up the required experience for their EMBA program to 7 or 8 years to further distinguish that program from the standard MBA.

<blockquote>I wonder if they could wrap those up into an MBA in some way?</blockquote>
I'm sure they could. The key would be to develop curriculum that fits in the niche between the MEB program and the EMBA, and includes an internship or hands-on project component. They certainly have the faculty to do it - and with their connections to employers through their executive education program, they'd have a recruitment base. I'd probably bump up the required experience for their EMBA program to 7 or 8 years to further distinguish that program from the standard MBA.
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