Mba from hongkong


Raju Rao
I wished to know how the mba offered by hongkong schools especially CUHK and HKU
stand up in terms of post MBA opportunities.
I wished to know how the mba offered by hongkong schools especially CUHK and HKU
stand up in terms of post MBA opportunities.
quote
Duncan
There's great data on that in the rankings produced by the FT and Economist. Take a look.
There's great data on that in the rankings produced by the FT and Economist. Take a look.
quote
maury
Do you have any specific questions about these programs?

They're both good schools and ranked well internationally. HKU tends to be a bit more competitive, with average GMAT scores being a bit higher there than at CUHK.

They have similar post-MBA profiles, both having strong placements in finance and tech and to some degree consulting. HKU graduates' salaries tend to be a bit higher
Do you have any specific questions about these programs?

They're both good schools and ranked well internationally. HKU tends to be a bit more competitive, with average GMAT scores being a bit higher there than at CUHK.

They have similar post-MBA profiles, both having strong placements in finance and tech and to some degree consulting. HKU graduates' salaries tend to be a bit higher
quote
Raju Rao
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
quote
Raju Rao
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
quote
Raju Rao
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
Thanks for your response.
2 things were in mind. One how strongly does a degree from Hong Kong compare with US( just below Ivy League) ones both in terms of international acceptance for placements and packages. Or are the placements majorly limited to HK and vicinity.
Two . Is CUHK also regarded as a topnotch international institute by recruiters in other continents. ( it enjoys a very high ranking)
quote
Duncan
I think it's the purchase power parity calculations that push all the Chinese programmes up in the ranking. In terms of its own alumni recommendations, CUHK is 84th out of 100 in the FT top 100. It has a lower salary than HKU and HKUST (which is by some way the top programme). I don't think that these are target school for positions in other continents, especially since these schools are in someways adapting to the mainland culture, as seen by the protests over the leadership at HKU which got global coverage (http://time.com/4062330/hong-kong-university-protest-johannes-chan/). If you must study in HK, the HKUST is a better choice. CEIBS would be even better if you wanted international credibility.
I think it's the purchase power parity calculations that push all the Chinese programmes up in the ranking. In terms of its own alumni recommendations, CUHK is 84th out of 100 in the FT top 100. It has a lower salary than HKU and HKUST (which is by some way the top programme). I don't think that these are target school for positions in other continents, especially since these schools are in someways adapting to the mainland culture, as seen by the protests over the leadership at HKU which got global coverage (http://time.com/4062330/hong-kong-university-protest-johannes-chan/). If you must study in HK, the HKUST is a better choice. CEIBS would be even better if you wanted international credibility.
quote
Raju Rao
Hi
Thanks
In the FT rankings CUHK features at 29 on 100 where HKU ST and HKU are 14th and 28th respectively. Your observation of 84th in 100??
Hi
Thanks
In the FT rankings CUHK features at 29 on 100 where HKU ST and HKU are 14th and 28th respectively. Your observation of 84th in 100??
quote
yipkc
84th out of 100 for alumni recommendation, meaning it is not as favoured by its previous students as the other 2 schools.
84th out of 100 for alumni recommendation, meaning it is not as favoured by its previous students as the other 2 schools.
quote
Hi,

Any idea about the average salaries from CUHK, HKU. The figures posted in FT rankings seem slightly high than what I have understood. according to my understanding the average is around 65k USD ?

Also do you think not knowing mandarin or chinese is a major drawback for foreign applicants.
Hi,

Any idea about the average salaries from CUHK, HKU. The figures posted in FT rankings seem slightly high than what I have understood. according to my understanding the average is around 65k USD ?

Also do you think not knowing mandarin or chinese is a major drawback for foreign applicants.
quote
Duncan
The FT rankings do not show starting salaries. Hover over the column headers for definitions. Otherwise see http://mbacareer.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/new/public/know_our_profile/employment_update.php
The FT rankings do not show starting salaries. Hover over the column headers for definitions. Otherwise see http://mbacareer.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/new/public/know_our_profile/employment_update.php
quote
I noticed that the CUHK MBA has only AASCB accreditation. Is it neccesary for a school to have AASCB, AMBA, Equis credentials to be accepted worldwide. / will a degree from CUHK be acceptable in India / US. if not how does one go about it
I noticed that the CUHK MBA has only AASCB accreditation. Is it neccesary for a school to have AASCB, AMBA, Equis credentials to be accepted worldwide. / will a degree from CUHK be acceptable in India / US. if not how does one go about it
quote
maury
Not necessarily, usually one of those three accreditations is fine if you want to ensure that you're getting a quality education.

In terms of "acceptance," that's sort of the wrong way to look at it. If you do an MBA from a real university that's accredited, of course it will be a valuable degree. Whether the employers you're targeting recruit from your particular school - or even if they're aware of it or not - is a different question altogether. For you to know this, you'll have to (a) ask the schools and employers you're targeting, or (2) look at LinkedIn data to see where graduates of the MBA programs end up.

The best advice usually is to study where you want to work. That said, these Hong Kong schools tend to have solid placements in various parts of the region - mainland China, along with Malaysia, Indonesia, etc. This will of course depend on each individual student, especially which language(s) they speak.
Not necessarily, usually one of those three accreditations is fine if you want to ensure that you're getting a quality education.

In terms of "acceptance," that's sort of the wrong way to look at it. If you do an MBA from a real university that's accredited, of course it will be a valuable degree. Whether the employers you're targeting recruit from your particular school - or even if they're aware of it or not - is a different question altogether. For you to know this, you'll have to (a) ask the schools and employers you're targeting, or (2) look at LinkedIn data to see where graduates of the MBA programs end up.

The best advice usually is to study where you want to work. That said, these Hong Kong schools tend to have solid placements in various parts of the region - mainland China, along with Malaysia, Indonesia, etc. This will of course depend on each individual student, especially which language(s) they speak.
quote
[


Thanks Maury,

Clears things up a bit. I know that it does depend on the knowledge of the recruiting firm also but have heard about one off cases of certain UK and australian degreess in India which failed to get credibility and hence the students were in a fix.

Ill go with your opinion that either of the three credentials is good enough . Also FT/ Economist would have mentioned in case there were issues with a particular degree getting credibility.


quote]Not necessarily, usually one of those three accreditations is fine if you want to ensure that you're getting a quality education.

In terms of "acceptance," that's sort of the wrong way to look at it. If you do an MBA from a real university that's accredited, of course it will be a valuable degree. Whether the employers you're targeting recruit from your particular school - or even if they're aware of it or not - is a different question altogether. For you to know this, you'll have to (a) ask the schools and employers you're targeting, or (2) look at LinkedIn data to see where graduates of the MBA programs end up.

The best advice usually is to study where you want to work. That said, these Hong Kong schools tend to have solid placements in various parts of the region - mainland China, along with Malaysia, Indonesia, etc. This will of course depend on each individual student, especially which language(s) they speak.
[




Thanks Maury,

Clears things up a bit. I know that it does depend on the knowledge of the recruiting firm also but have heard about one off cases of certain UK and australian degreess in India which failed to get credibility and hence the students were in a fix.

Ill go with your opinion that either of the three credentials is good enough . Also FT/ Economist would have mentioned in case there were issues with a particular degree getting credibility.










quote]Not necessarily, usually one of those three accreditations is fine if you want to ensure that you're getting a quality education.

In terms of "acceptance," that's sort of the wrong way to look at it. If you do an MBA from a real university that's accredited, of course it will be a valuable degree. Whether the employers you're targeting recruit from your particular school - or even if they're aware of it or not - is a different question altogether. For you to know this, you'll have to (a) ask the schools and employers you're targeting, or (2) look at LinkedIn data to see where graduates of the MBA programs end up.

The best advice usually is to study where you want to work. That said, these Hong Kong schools tend to have solid placements in various parts of the region - mainland China, along with Malaysia, Indonesia, etc. This will of course depend on each individual student, especially which language(s) they speak.[/quote]
quote

Reply to Post

Related Business Schools

Hong Kong, Hong Kong (PRC) 20 Followers 75 Discussions
Hong Kong, Hong Kong (PRC) 39 Followers 79 Discussions

Related Articles

Part-Time MBA Programs in Hong Kong: Refreshing Careers in Asia

Sep 26, 2013

Flexible programs in the financial center appeal to working professionals in the city and beyond

MBA Programs in Emerging Markets: China and Hong Kong

Jan 18, 2010

Incredible growth is attracting international students to MBA programs in China

More Articles