Is it worth it to go to UCD Smurfit for a masters in strategic management?


I have been accepted by the school and was wondering if it is a good school. The FT ranks it pretty high. My main aim is to work in a Big 4 accounting or any of the Fortune 500 firms really. I am from india and would not like to return home upon graduation

I have been accepted by the school and was wondering if it is a good school. The FT ranks it pretty high. My main aim is to work in a Big 4 accounting or any of the Fortune 500 firms really. I am from india and would not like to return home upon graduation
quote
Duncan

You will have seen that this unique degree has a lower level of placement than their MSc in management consulting, MiM or master's in international management, which is the ranked one.

You will have seen that this unique degree has a lower level of placement than their MSc in management consulting, MiM or master's in international management, which is the ranked one.
quote

You will have seen that this unique degree has a lower level of placement than their MSc in management consulting, MiM or master's in international management, which is the ranked one.
I did see that. They said that since i have a background in strategy, it would be best if i choose this and out of the 3 options i applied to gave me an offer to attend this program. Is it worth it to go ahead with this?

[quote]You will have seen that this unique degree has a lower level of placement than their MSc in management consulting, MiM or master's in international management, which is the ranked one. [/quote] I did see that. They said that since i have a background in strategy, it would be best if i choose this and out of the 3 options i applied to gave me an offer to attend this program. Is it worth it to go ahead with this?
quote
Duncan

I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly/2014/03/24/the-death-of-strategic-planning-why/#3db2ccec404a

I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly/2014/03/24/the-death-of-strategic-planning-why/#3db2ccec404a
quote

I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly/2014/03/24/the-death-of-strategic-planning-why/#3db2ccec404a

I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly...]
Wouldn't this be a suitable degree for other roles as well? I already have an undergraduate degree in finance. I did talk to some students who did this degree at UCD and all.of them found jobs in Ireland. The ones I talked to were from my country so it does mean that it could be a good option for international mobility too as Ireland offers a 2 year work search visa. Unfortunately, this is the only course I got offered at Smurfit as they pick one out of the three courses that you apply to depending on your profile. I am in the process of applying to Trinity as well. What do you think of the management masters at Trinity College Dublin?
I have an acceptance from skema but the people from my country who applied there are from the worst unis and still have acceptances. They don't even ask for an English language certificate. I wonder what the quality of students will be like over there.

[quote]I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly/2014/03/24/the-death-of-strategic-planning-why/#3db2ccec404a [/quote]
I agree that this is a degree with a really engaging design. However, if your goal is to find work, why not take the option with a 95 percent employment rate rather than an 80 percent rate? Doesn't that suggest that employers don't have too many openings for strategic planners? I guess you have seen::https://www.forbes.com/sites/billconerly...]
Wouldn't this be a suitable degree for other roles as well? I already have an undergraduate degree in finance. I did talk to some students who did this degree at UCD and all.of them found jobs in Ireland. The ones I talked to were from my country so it does mean that it could be a good option for international mobility too as Ireland offers a 2 year work search visa. Unfortunately, this is the only course I got offered at Smurfit as they pick one out of the three courses that you apply to depending on your profile. I am in the process of applying to Trinity as well. What do you think of the management masters at Trinity College Dublin?
I have an acceptance from skema but the people from my country who applied there are from the worst unis and still have acceptances. They don't even ask for an English language certificate. I wonder what the quality of students will be like over there.
quote

Wouldn't this be a suitable degree for other roles as well? I already have an undergraduate degree in finance. I did talk to some students who did this degree at UCD and all.of them found jobs in Ireland. The ones I talked to were from my country so it does mean that it could be a good option for international mobility too as Ireland offers a 2 year work search visa. Unfortunately, this is the only course I got offered at Smurfit as they pick one out of the three courses that you apply to depending on your profile. I am in the process of applying to Trinity as well. What do you think of the management masters at Trinity College Dublin?
I have an acceptance from skema but the people from my country who applied there are from the worst unis and still have acceptances. They don't even ask for an English language certificate. I wonder what the quality of students will be like over there.
Lastly what do you thibk about schools lile University of Amsterdam or Erasmus University Rotterdam which offer a management masters? RSM requires the GMAT but Erasmus doesn't

[Edited by frasier12345 on Dec 27, 2019]


Wouldn't this be a suitable degree for other roles as well? I already have an undergraduate degree in finance. I did talk to some students who did this degree at UCD and all.of them found jobs in Ireland. The ones I talked to were from my country so it does mean that it could be a good option for international mobility too as Ireland offers a 2 year work search visa. Unfortunately, this is the only course I got offered at Smurfit as they pick one out of the three courses that you apply to depending on your profile. I am in the process of applying to Trinity as well. What do you think of the management masters at Trinity College Dublin?
I have an acceptance from skema but the people from my country who applied there are from the worst unis and still have acceptances. They don't even ask for an English language certificate. I wonder what the quality of students will be like over there.
Lastly what do you thibk about schools lile University of Amsterdam or Erasmus University Rotterdam which offer a management masters? RSM requires the GMAT but Erasmus doesn't
quote
Duncan

All the schools are ranked fairly, but it's important to note that the FT MiM ranking reflects the flagship programme. As you can see at Smurfit, outcomes differ.

You have spoken to people with good outcomes, but you know that one person in five does not have a role after half a year. That is a very long time. So, because you have spoken to an unrepresentative sample their outcomes are not necessarily indicative.

All the schools are ranked fairly, but it's important to note that the FT MiM ranking reflects the flagship programme. As you can see at Smurfit, outcomes differ.

You have spoken to people with good outcomes, but you know that one person in five does not have a role after half a year. That is a very long time. So, because you have spoken to an unrepresentative sample their outcomes are not necessarily indicative.
quote

All the schools are ranked fairly, but it's important to note that the FT MiM ranking reflects the flagship programme. As you can see at Smurfit, outcomes differ.

You have spoken to people with good outcomes, but you know that one person in five does not have a role after half a year. That is a very long time. So, because you have spoken to an unrepresentative sample their outcomes are not necessarily indicative.

So would you recommend me to go to skema instead even though it seems to function kind of like hult where people don't get rejected if they apply?

[quote]All the schools are ranked fairly, but it's important to note that the FT MiM ranking reflects the flagship programme. As you can see at Smurfit, outcomes differ.

You have spoken to people with good outcomes, but you know that one person in five does not have a role after half a year. That is a very long time. So, because you have spoken to an unrepresentative sample their outcomes are not necessarily indicative. [/quote]
So would you recommend me to go to skema instead even though it seems to function kind of like hult where people don't get rejected if they apply?
quote
Duncan

There are lots of options, not only the ones you have in your hand. You could, for example, decline UCD and reapply for its CEMS MIM.

There are lots of options, not only the ones you have in your hand. You could, for example, decline UCD and reapply for its CEMS MIM.
quote

There are lots of options, not only the ones you have in your hand. You could, for example, decline UCD and reapply for its CEMS MIM.

Unfortunately they have only accepted me for the strategic management.

[quote]There are lots of options, not only the ones you have in your hand. You could, for example, decline UCD and reapply for its CEMS MIM. [/quote]
Unfortunately they have only accepted me for the strategic management.
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Duncan

Because you applied for it. You could withdraw your application.

Because you applied for it. You could withdraw your application.
quote

Because you applied for it. You could withdraw your application.

I have also applied to international management and management consulting. They only accepted me to the strategy one. Should I ask them to reconsider?

[Edited by frasier12345 on Dec 30, 2019]

[quote]Because you applied for it. You could withdraw your application. [/quote]
I have also applied to international management and management consulting. They only accepted me to the strategy one. Should I ask them to reconsider?
quote
Duncan

There are lots of options. Certainly, you can say that you no longer want to take the planning degree and are researching other schools. You would, however, love their feedback on how you could enter the CEMS MIM degree. You will need to do some research so you can explain why that is the better fit for your career goals.

There are lots of options. Certainly, you can say that you no longer want to take the planning degree and are researching other schools. You would, however, love their feedback on how you could enter the CEMS MIM degree. You will need to do some research so you can explain why that is the better fit for your career goals.
quote

There are lots of options. Certainly, you can say that you no longer want to take the planning degree and are researching other schools. You would, however, love their feedback on how you could enter the CEMS MIM degree. You will need to do some research so you can explain why that is the better fit for your career goals.

Dear Duncan would you recommend that I don't go in for this degree? The degree does have an engaging design and is what I am interested in. What do you think about going in for this degree and applying for finance and consulting jobs? The work visa regulations in Ireland are also very favourable and most Indians I know there found jobs. However I will write to them and ask them for a feedback.
Also, what do you think about trinity College Dublin's master in management? Is that a better degree than the strategic management degree at UCD? I have also been accepted by skema, Victoria University Wellington and university of Otago but honestly I don't know anyone who got rejected by skema even though they are in the top 10. They didn't even ask for an IELTS score
The Smurfit website states that the employment rate within 6 months is about 80 percent for both msc finance and msc management while the financial Times shows something else

[Edited by frasier12345 on Jan 02, 2020]

[quote]There are lots of options. Certainly, you can say that you no longer want to take the planning degree and are researching other schools. You would, however, love their feedback on how you could enter the CEMS MIM degree. You will need to do some research so you can explain why that is the better fit for your career goals. [/quote]
Dear Duncan would you recommend that I don't go in for this degree? The degree does have an engaging design and is what I am interested in. What do you think about going in for this degree and applying for finance and consulting jobs? The work visa regulations in Ireland are also very favourable and most Indians I know there found jobs. However I will write to them and ask them for a feedback.
Also, what do you think about trinity College Dublin's master in management? Is that a better degree than the strategic management degree at UCD? I have also been accepted by skema, Victoria University Wellington and university of Otago but honestly I don't know anyone who got rejected by skema even though they are in the top 10. They didn't even ask for an IELTS score
The Smurfit website states that the employment rate within 6 months is about 80 percent for both msc finance and msc management while the financial Times shows something else
quote
Duncan

I would not want to approach it that way. If think you need career strategy, and then look at schools. Picking from such a widely varied bag of schools isn't optimal.

I would not want to approach it that way. If think you need career strategy, and then look at schools. Picking from such a widely varied bag of schools isn't optimal.
quote

I would not want to approach it that way. If think you need career strategy, and then look at schools. Picking from such a widely varied bag of schools isn't optimal.

to be honest I have always wanted to work in New zealand but the people i talked to from my country who studied there painted a bleak picture and told me that there are hardly any masters or mba level jobs available. At this point, i would either like to work in corporate banking or consulting and emigrate to a different country and settle there. Hence i picked up schools in countries which have a 2 year post degree job search visa like ireland, New zealand and France. i was a bit skeptical about going to skema because 1) i havent heard good things about the school 2) I dont know anyone who got rejected by the school 3) A friend of mine with a 5.5 in the IELTS got an offer to study the masters there 4) My french and algerian friends told me that it isnt taken seriously by the employers for front office roles.

[Edited by frasier12345 on Jan 03, 2020]

[quote]I would not want to approach it that way. If think you need career strategy, and then look at schools. Picking from such a widely varied bag of schools isn't optimal.[/quote]
to be honest I have always wanted to work in New zealand but the people i talked to from my country who studied there painted a bleak picture and told me that there are hardly any masters or mba level jobs available. At this point, i would either like to work in corporate banking or consulting and emigrate to a different country and settle there. Hence i picked up schools in countries which have a 2 year post degree job search visa like ireland, New zealand and France. i was a bit skeptical about going to skema because 1) i havent heard good things about the school 2) I dont know anyone who got rejected by the school 3) A friend of mine with a 5.5 in the IELTS got an offer to study the masters there 4) My french and algerian friends told me that it isnt taken seriously by the employers for front office roles.
quote
smartcanad...

@frasier123 - I have read some of your previous posts. It seems you just want to escape from your current job / career in India and migrate to a developed country. If that is your sole purpose (immigration+job) then I think your odds are best in Singapore. There is a large Indian community there so you will feel welcome. Singapore also values work experience across Asia (even developing countries), whereas North American/European employers might prefer local candidates. Singapore has a number of good bschools (NUS, NTU and SMU), all of which always place very well in Singapore. One thing to remember though - no matter which country or school, there is always an element of risk involved in terms of getting jobs. You just have to search for the best ROI given the risk you want to take. High risk = high return whereas low risk = low return. Your lowest risk is actually to study in India (where it is cheapest). Highest risk is to fork over $200K USD for an M7 MBA, but it also pays the most (if you get a job/sponsorship in the US).

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 03, 2020]

@frasier123 - I have read some of your previous posts. It seems you just want to escape from your current job / career in India and migrate to a developed country. If that is your sole purpose (immigration+job) then I think your odds are best in Singapore. There is a large Indian community there so you will feel welcome. Singapore also values work experience across Asia (even developing countries), whereas North American/European employers might prefer local candidates. Singapore has a number of good bschools (NUS, NTU and SMU), all of which always place very well in Singapore. One thing to remember though - no matter which country or school, there is always an element of risk involved in terms of getting jobs. You just have to search for the best ROI given the risk you want to take. High risk = high return whereas low risk = low return. Your lowest risk is actually to study in India (where it is cheapest). Highest risk is to fork over $200K USD for an M7 MBA, but it also pays the most (if you get a job/sponsorship in the US).
quote

@frasier123 - I have read some of your previous posts. It seems you just want to escape from your current job / career in India and migrate to a developed country. If that is your sole purpose (immigration+job) then I think your odds are best in Singapore. There is a large Indian community there so you will feel welcome. Singapore also values work experience across Asia (even developing countries), whereas North American/European employers might prefer local candidates. Singapore has a number of good bschools (NUS, NTU and SMU), all of which always place very well in Singapore. One thing to remember though - no matter which country or school, there is always an element of risk involved in terms of getting jobs. You just have to search for the best ROI given the risk you want to take. High risk = high return whereas low risk = low return. Your lowest risk is actually to study in India (where it is cheapest). Highest risk is to fork over $200K USD for an M7 MBA, but it also pays the most (if you get a job/sponsorship in the US).

What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe.

[quote]@frasier123 - I have read some of your previous posts. It seems you just want to escape from your current job / career in India and migrate to a developed country. If that is your sole purpose (immigration+job) then I think your odds are best in Singapore. There is a large Indian community there so you will feel welcome. Singapore also values work experience across Asia (even developing countries), whereas North American/European employers might prefer local candidates. Singapore has a number of good bschools (NUS, NTU and SMU), all of which always place very well in Singapore. One thing to remember though - no matter which country or school, there is always an element of risk involved in terms of getting jobs. You just have to search for the best ROI given the risk you want to take. High risk = high return whereas low risk = low return. Your lowest risk is actually to study in India (where it is cheapest). Highest risk is to fork over $200K USD for an M7 MBA, but it also pays the most (if you get a job/sponsorship in the US). [/quote]
What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe.
quote
smartcanad...

What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe.


Then your should clearly focus on Europe if that is your preference. There is no point applying to US/Canada unless you prefer working in North America. In your case, I think the risk is lower in Europe because you already have work experience from there and it will be more valued in Europe. In Canada, your European work experience will be devalued (unless you worked at a well known consulting firm or bank in the UK, which is connected to Canada for historical reasons).

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 03, 2020]


[quote] What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe. [/quote]

Then your should clearly focus on Europe if that is your preference. There is no point applying to US/Canada unless you prefer working in North America. In your case, I think the risk is lower in Europe because you already have work experience from there and it will be more valued in Europe. In Canada, your European work experience will be devalued (unless you worked at a well known consulting firm or bank in the UK, which is connected to Canada for historical reasons).
quote


What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe.


Then your should clearly focus on Europe if that is your preference. There is no point applying to US/Canada unless you prefer working in North America. In your case, I think the risk is lower in Europe because you already have work experience from there and it will be more valued in Europe. In Canada, your European work experience will be devalued (unless you worked at a well known consulting firm or bank in the UK, which is connected to Canada for historical reasons).

I have no family in Europe and even though I loved my experience in Italy, I would aim for an English speaking country. I speak italian but am more comfortable in speaking English or working in English. Hence, Ireland or canada. I have lots of family in Toronto so I felt that I would feel more comfortable there. That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR

[Edited by frasier12345 on Jan 04, 2020]

[quote]
[quote] What about Canada or Ireland? I have lived in Europe for 5 years and Singapore for a few months. I rather live in Europe. [/quote]

Then your should clearly focus on Europe if that is your preference. There is no point applying to US/Canada unless you prefer working in North America. In your case, I think the risk is lower in Europe because you already have work experience from there and it will be more valued in Europe. In Canada, your European work experience will be devalued (unless you worked at a well known consulting firm or bank in the UK, which is connected to Canada for historical reasons). [/quote]
I have no family in Europe and even though I loved my experience in Italy, I would aim for an English speaking country. I speak italian but am more comfortable in speaking English or working in English. Hence, Ireland or canada. I have lots of family in Toronto so I felt that I would feel more comfortable there. That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR
quote

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