Is it worth it to go to UCD Smurfit for a masters in strategic management?


smartcanad...

That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR


In making your decision, I suggest a 2 step approach. First step is the country. If Canada is where you want to be, no point in applying to European schools. Go straight to Canada. If you want to be in Europe, don't apply to Canada. Second step is choosing the right school within your choice country.

At this point, I don't think you've decided which country yet (note: choose only one). My sense is you want to experience it all. You want to study in Europe but migrate to Canada and also maybe move to New Zealand later on. While being adventurous/spontaneous is definitely fun (I remember having the same fantasies when I was younger about travelling the world), the lack of focus will make it difficult to have a great career (as I think Duncan also suggested). Careers are built on stability, developing expertise (in the job and culture) and building contacts through the years. None of which is possible if you don't have focus. If you study in Europe then work in Canada, your life/job search will be much harder than if you had gone straight to Canada to study.

If you choose Canada or US, I can definitely provide advice on that (including your questions about what type of diploma/degree to pursue). For Europe, there are better experts on this board.

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 04, 2020]

[quote] That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR[/quote]

In making your decision, I suggest a 2 step approach. First step is the country. If Canada is where you want to be, no point in applying to European schools. Go straight to Canada. If you want to be in Europe, don't apply to Canada. Second step is choosing the right school within your choice country.

At this point, I don't think you've decided which country yet (note: choose only one). My sense is you want to experience it all. You want to study in Europe but migrate to Canada and also maybe move to New Zealand later on. While being adventurous/spontaneous is definitely fun (I remember having the same fantasies when I was younger about travelling the world), the lack of focus will make it difficult to have a great career (as I think Duncan also suggested). Careers are built on stability, developing expertise (in the job and culture) and building contacts through the years. None of which is possible if you don't have focus. If you study in Europe then work in Canada, your life/job search will be much harder than if you had gone straight to Canada to study.

If you choose Canada or US, I can definitely provide advice on that (including your questions about what type of diploma/degree to pursue). For Europe, there are better experts on this board.


quote

That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR


In making your decision, I suggest a 2 step approach. First step is the country. If Canada is where you want to be, no point in applying to European schools. Go straight to Canada. If you want to be in Europe, don't apply to Canada. Second step is choosing the right school within your choice country.

At this point, I don't think you've decided which country yet (note: choose only one). My sense is you want to experience it all. You want to study in Europe but migrate to Canada and also maybe move to New Zealand later on. While being adventurous/spontaneous is definitely fun (I remember having the same fantasies when I was younger about travelling the world), the lack of focus will make it difficult to have a great career (as I think Duncan also suggested). Careers are built on stability, developing expertise (in the job and culture) and building contacts through the years. None of which is possible if you don't have focus. If you study in Europe then work in Canada, your life/job search will be much harder than if you had gone straight to Canada to study.

If you choose Canada or US, I can definitely provide advice on that (including your questions about what type of diploma/degree to pursue). For Europe, there are better experts on this board.



I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful

[quote][quote] That is why I wanted to migrate to the country. It is easier to get a PR too. I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.
However ofc this doesn't seem to fit well as most people would call me crazy for going for a diploma after graduating from bocconi. I really don't mind this however if it is a route to getting a good job and a PR[/quote]

In making your decision, I suggest a 2 step approach. First step is the country. If Canada is where you want to be, no point in applying to European schools. Go straight to Canada. If you want to be in Europe, don't apply to Canada. Second step is choosing the right school within your choice country.

At this point, I don't think you've decided which country yet (note: choose only one). My sense is you want to experience it all. You want to study in Europe but migrate to Canada and also maybe move to New Zealand later on. While being adventurous/spontaneous is definitely fun (I remember having the same fantasies when I was younger about travelling the world), the lack of focus will make it difficult to have a great career (as I think Duncan also suggested). Careers are built on stability, developing expertise (in the job and culture) and building contacts through the years. None of which is possible if you don't have focus. If you study in Europe then work in Canada, your life/job search will be much harder than if you had gone straight to Canada to study.

If you choose Canada or US, I can definitely provide advice on that (including your questions about what type of diploma/degree to pursue). For Europe, there are better experts on this board.


[/quote]
I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful
quote
Duncan

@smartcanada is raising excellent points. You can use their time more productivity by doing some research into Canada and coming back with more specific questions. The top Canadian school is Ivey: https://www.ivey.uwo.ca/msc/

@smartcanada is raising excellent points. You can use their time more productivity by doing some research into Canada and coming back with more specific questions. The top Canadian school is Ivey: https://www.ivey.uwo.ca/msc/
quote
smartcanad...


I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful


I agree with Duncan. My suggestion is to do some self-reflection, give it a few weeks to make certain that Canada is your choice. If you are still decided on Canada, you can repost on a new thread in the Canada/Latin Am board.

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 04, 2020]

[quote]
I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful[/quote]

I agree with Duncan. My suggestion is to do some self-reflection, give it a few weeks to make certain that Canada is your choice. If you are still decided on Canada, you can repost on a new thread in the Canada/Latin Am board.
quote


I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful


I agree with Duncan. My suggestion is to do some self-reflection, give it a few weeks to make certain that Canada is your choice. If you are still decided on Canada, you can repost on a new thread in the Canada/Latin Am board.


Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?

[quote][quote]
I think I will stick to Canada. Could you please tell me about it? I would be Very grateful[/quote]

I agree with Duncan. My suggestion is to do some self-reflection, give it a few weeks to make certain that Canada is your choice. If you are still decided on Canada, you can repost on a new thread in the Canada/Latin Am board. [/quote]

Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?
quote
smartcanad...



Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?


Those programs (which are not degrees but certificates) are hit or miss with very little placement info. I would avoid those if I were an international student. Most of those programs do not qualify an international student for a work permit (unlike a real degree) and will not qualify for additional points for immigration purposes. They are good for people with Canadian education and experience but are transitioning to a new field (e.g. a University of Toronto history graduate who wants to do marketing communications) or for those who were recently laid off (Ontario government subsidizes the tuition for unemployed who qualify).

[quote]

Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?[/quote]

Those programs (which are not degrees but certificates) are hit or miss with very little placement info. I would avoid those if I were an international student. Most of those programs do not qualify an international student for a work permit (unlike a real degree) and will not qualify for additional points for immigration purposes. They are good for people with Canadian education and experience but are transitioning to a new field (e.g. a University of Toronto history graduate who wants to do marketing communications) or for those who were recently laid off (Ontario government subsidizes the tuition for unemployed who qualify).
quote
Duncan

I imagine that diplomas can can also help people to get into master's programmes that require honours in the undergraduate degree.

[Edited by Duncan on Jan 05, 2020]

I imagine that diplomas can can also help people to get into master's programmes that require honours in the undergraduate degree.
quote



Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?


Those programs (which are not degrees but certificates) are hit or miss with very little placement info. I would avoid those if I were an international student. Most of those programs do not qualify an international student for a work permit (unlike a real degree) and will not qualify for additional points for immigration purposes. They are good for people with Canadian education and experience but are transitioning to a new field (e.g. a University of Toronto history graduate who wants to do marketing communications) or for those who were recently laid off (Ontario government subsidizes the tuition for unemployed who qualify).

I found out that the post graduate diploma in data science does qualify for points during immigration. Duncan Is right. I only have a 3 year undergraduate degree. Universities like Windsor do accept a pg diploma of one year plus a 3 year undergrad as an honors degree

[quote][quote]

Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?[/quote]

Those programs (which are not degrees but certificates) are hit or miss with very little placement info. I would avoid those if I were an international student. Most of those programs do not qualify an international student for a work permit (unlike a real degree) and will not qualify for additional points for immigration purposes. They are good for people with Canadian education and experience but are transitioning to a new field (e.g. a University of Toronto history graduate who wants to do marketing communications) or for those who were recently laid off (Ontario government subsidizes the tuition for unemployed who qualify). [/quote]
I found out that the post graduate diploma in data science does qualify for points during immigration. Duncan Is right. I only have a 3 year undergraduate degree. Universities like Windsor do accept a pg diploma of one year plus a 3 year undergrad as an honors degree
quote
smartcanad...


I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.

Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?

Duncan Is right. I only have a 3 year undergraduate degree. Universities like Windsor do accept a pg diploma of one year plus a 3 year undergrad as an honors degree


I am confused about your question. You mentioned you were exploring "college like Seneca". Seneca is part of the college system in Ontario. "College" in Ontario is not the same as University, it is its own separate system. By law, they cannot offer a postgraduate diploma, they can only offer Ontario Graduate Certificates. The "diplomas" Seneca offers are pre-bachelors and are intended to transfer over to a bachelors program (2+2), similar to a community college in the US or an HND in the UK.

Here is a link to the Ontario qualifications framework. These graduate certificates (also called post-diploma certificate programs) from Colleges are below that of the bachelors degree.
http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/pepg/programs/oqf/ontario-qualifications-framework-oct-2018-en.pdf

I do not know a College in Ontario that offers a post graduate diploma in data science. Perhaps you are referring to a University (not Seneca), which in that case you are correct, but I still would not recommend that over a masters degree. In Toronto, there are too many overqualified people, and people who work in Data Science have a minimum of a masters degree and most have a PhD in a quant field.

I think this is getting off-topic (UCD Smurfit) and you should consider discussing this in a separate thread.

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 05, 2020]

[quote]
I was wondering what you think about me getting a post graduate diploma in data science or finance from a college like Seneca. Are they viewed badly by the Canadian employers? I could do that, work for a few years then go in for a Canadian MBA.

Ok will do so. Thanks for the help. Just one quick question. How are diplomas from places like Seneca considered in Canada?

Duncan Is right. I only have a 3 year undergraduate degree. Universities like Windsor do accept a pg diploma of one year plus a 3 year undergrad as an honors degree [/quote]

I am confused about your question. You mentioned you were exploring "college like Seneca". Seneca is part of the college system in Ontario. "College" in Ontario is not the same as University, it is its own separate system. By law, they cannot offer a postgraduate diploma, they can only offer Ontario Graduate Certificates. The "diplomas" Seneca offers are pre-bachelors and are intended to transfer over to a bachelors program (2+2), similar to a community college in the US or an HND in the UK.

Here is a link to the Ontario qualifications framework. These graduate certificates (also called post-diploma certificate programs) from Colleges are below that of the bachelors degree.
http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/pepg/programs/oqf/ontario-qualifications-framework-oct-2018-en.pdf

I do not know a College in Ontario that offers a post graduate diploma in data science. Perhaps you are referring to a University (not Seneca), which in that case you are correct, but I still would not recommend that over a masters degree. In Toronto, there are too many overqualified people, and people who work in Data Science have a minimum of a masters degree and most have a PhD in a quant field.

I think this is getting off-topic (UCD Smurfit) and you should consider discussing this in a separate thread.
quote

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