GMP or MBA?


repoman

I have been considering doing an General Management Programme instead of an MBA. As I see it the pros are that I can get the core MBA skills, pay a bit less money, and be done quicker. The cons are that the networking and career services are not as good, fewer or no electives, and that it's not as recognizable a qualification.

Am I missing anything?

I have been considering doing an General Management Programme instead of an MBA. As I see it the pros are that I can get the core MBA skills, pay a bit less money, and be done quicker. The cons are that the networking and career services are not as good, fewer or no electives, and that it's not as recognizable a qualification.

Am I missing anything?
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repoman

No opinions?

No opinions?
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Duncan

Well, it's an odd way to pose it. The Harvard GMP, for example, is eight weeks. There are numerous Executive MBAs involving the same, or less time on campus and lower fees. So I think you have to be specific. Personally I'd rather take the Purdue / TiasNimbas IMM, which leads to two MBA degrees, than then GMP. If you really want a Harvard label then the ALM in Management gives you an actual masters degree for half the price of the GMP.

Well, it's an odd way to pose it. The Harvard GMP, for example, is eight weeks. There are numerous Executive MBAs involving the same, or less time on campus and lower fees. So I think you have to be specific. Personally I'd rather take the Purdue / TiasNimbas IMM, which leads to two MBA degrees, than then GMP. If you really want a Harvard label then the ALM in Management gives you an actual masters degree for half the price of the GMP.
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bigblue

They're really two different things - usually, if you're considering a GMP then your work experience puts you more in the EMBA range of degree programs.

I would check with your employer, because often times they'll help executives with the costs of programs like this, and have definite opinions on what you should do based on their needs in the company.

Indeed, GMPs will require less time commitment, but may not actually cost less. The degree programs will usually help develop a broader skillset and provide more functional networking.

Maybe you should give us an idea of your reasons for pursuing one of these programs, as well as your background and goals.

They're really two different things - usually, if you're considering a GMP then your work experience puts you more in the EMBA range of degree programs.

I would check with your employer, because often times they'll help executives with the costs of programs like this, and have definite opinions on what you should do based on their needs in the company.

Indeed, GMPs will require less time commitment, but may not actually cost less. The degree programs will usually help develop a broader skillset and provide more functional networking.

Maybe you should give us an idea of your reasons for pursuing one of these programs, as well as your background and goals.
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Sparks

I agree with Duncan and bligblue's comments.

How experienced are you? If you've years of senior management under your belt, then a GMP might be more appropriate. MBAs are often a route to help people transition from middle to senior management. If you're already a senior manager, you might find the cohort on a GMP more your level.

Having said that, some schools have different GMPs matched to different levels of experience. Ashridge and Cranfield spring to mind, because both schools offer four levels of GMP:

www.ashridge.org.uk/Website/Content.nsf/wOPN/General+Management+Programmes?opendocument

www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/p13561/Programmes-and-Executive-Development/General-Management-Development

The Ashridge programmes have the advantage of counting towards an MSc in Management too.

I agree with Duncan and bligblue's comments.

How experienced are you? If you've years of senior management under your belt, then a GMP might be more appropriate. MBAs are often a route to help people transition from middle to senior management. If you're already a senior manager, you might find the cohort on a GMP more your level.

Having said that, some schools have different GMPs matched to different levels of experience. Ashridge and Cranfield spring to mind, because both schools offer four levels of GMP:

www.ashridge.org.uk/Website/Content.nsf/wOPN/General+Management+Programmes?opendocument

www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/p13561/Programmes-and-Executive-Development/General-Management-Development

The Ashridge programmes have the advantage of counting towards an MSc in Management too.
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ralph

Adding to what Sparks said - there are some interesting general management programs coming up. Check out this Cambridge program:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2975

It runs a couple times a year and there's one starting in May. It's a two-week program that covers everything from strategic management to organizational change. It's designed for people with five+ years of experience.

And if repoman is in the US, this two-week one at Columbia is pricy but worth it:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/342

Focusing on leadership, this one is really for higher-level executives - and it tends to draw its participants from a huge array of industries, making for dynamic class discussion and participation.

Adding to what Sparks said - there are some interesting general management programs coming up. Check out this Cambridge program:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2975

It runs a couple times a year and there's one starting in May. It's a two-week program that covers everything from strategic management to organizational change. It's designed for people with five+ years of experience.

And if repoman is in the US, this two-week one at Columbia is pricy but worth it:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/342

Focusing on leadership, this one is really for higher-level executives - and it tends to draw its participants from a huge array of industries, making for dynamic class discussion and participation.
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Sparks

I'd further add that some GMPs offer things that MBAs don't, so a GMP can occasionally be better than an MBA.

E.g. Saïd arguably provides more leadership skill development in some of its GMP programmes than in its MBA/EMBA programmes. This is because GMP programmes aren't university qualifications, so they don't need to be judged according to academic criteria. Whereas the MBA/EMBA have to meet Oxford University's academic standards (including academic methods of assessment and examination).

I'd further add that some GMPs offer things that MBAs don't, so a GMP can occasionally be better than an MBA.

E.g. Saïd arguably provides more leadership skill development in some of its GMP programmes than in its MBA/EMBA programmes. This is because GMP programmes aren't university qualifications, so they don't need to be judged according to academic criteria. Whereas the MBA/EMBA have to meet Oxford University's academic standards (including academic methods of assessment and examination).
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ezra

I'd further add that some GMPs offer things that MBAs don't, so a GMP can occasionally be better than an MBA.

E.g. Saïd arguably provides more leadership skill development in some of its GMP programmes than in its MBA/EMBA programmes.

I'd agree with that - but these programs are tailored for a different class of career capacities and expectations. Said's GMP is designed for executives with at least 10 years of experience, whereas MBA students have about 6 years. The GMP is more comparable to the EMBA, but the EMBA costs a lot more, but is a far broader experience: it includes components like an overseas module and an entrepreneurship project.

<blockquote>I'd further add that some GMPs offer things that MBAs don't, so a GMP can occasionally be better than an MBA.

E.g. Saïd arguably provides more leadership skill development in some of its GMP programmes than in its MBA/EMBA programmes. </blockquote>
I'd agree with that - but these programs are tailored for a different class of career capacities and expectations. Said's GMP is designed for executives with at least 10 years of experience, whereas MBA students have about 6 years. The GMP is more comparable to the EMBA, but the EMBA costs a lot more, but is a far broader experience: it includes components like an overseas module and an entrepreneurship project.
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maubia

Another example is ESCP which offers a GMP based on their emba; it's based on 9 week-ends and built around the core emba modules.
At the end you can pick up the missing electives and get the emba (this is a quite interesting options)

Another example is ESCP which offers a GMP based on their emba; it's based on 9 week-ends and built around the core emba modules.
At the end you can pick up the missing electives and get the emba (this is a quite interesting options)
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ezra

Indeed - and with the addition of the international consulting project that you have to do to convert your GMP to an EMBA, this program becomes very robust.

Another example is ESCP which offers a GMP based on their emba; it's based on 9 week-ends and built around the core emba modules.
At the end you can pick up the missing electives and get the emba (this is a quite interesting options)

Indeed - and with the addition of the international consulting project that you have to do to convert your GMP to an EMBA, this program becomes very robust.

<blockquote>Another example is ESCP which offers a GMP based on their emba; it's based on 9 week-ends and built around the core emba modules.
At the end you can pick up the missing electives and get the emba (this is a quite interesting options)</blockquote>
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Well personally I think an MBA would make a better investment in your future for several reasons such as: recognition, career growth, greater salaries, in-depth knowledge of the field etc. I?ve been considering an MBA myself, of late and have looked up the Internet for a few colleges that I think will suit me best. California College San Diego is one of these colleges. The few reviews about California College San Diego I read show what the college can offer its students in terms of services, quality education and experiences. I think if you have a better understanding of your personal and professionals goals you can make a better decision about your education. So I?d suggest you take some time to introspect before making any decision.

Well personally I think an MBA would make a better investment in your future for several reasons such as: recognition, career growth, greater salaries, in-depth knowledge of the field etc. I?ve been considering an MBA myself, of late and have looked up the Internet for a few colleges that I think will suit me best. California College San Diego is one of these colleges. The few reviews about California College San Diego I read show what the college can offer its students in terms of services, quality education and experiences. I think if you have a better understanding of your personal and professionals goals you can make a better decision about your education. So I?d suggest you take some time to introspect before making any decision.
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ezra

Without being accredited by any major international accreditation body, I don't know how you can take this program seriously - at least compared to the other schools we're talking about in this thread.

The few reviews about California College San Diego I read show what the college can offer its students in terms of services, quality education and experiences.

Without being accredited by any major international accreditation body, I don't know how you can take this program seriously - at least compared to the other schools we're talking about in this thread.

<blockquote>The few reviews about California College San Diego I read show what the college can offer its students in terms of services, quality education and experiences.</blockquote>
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Duncan

Moises, what is this "link updater" thing that produces your posts? Are you a real person, or a software robot? I never heard anyone say anything good about California College San Diego, so I am curious.

Moises, what is this "link updater" thing that produces your posts? Are you a real person, or a software robot? I never heard anyone say anything good about California College San Diego, so I am curious.
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