Difficulty for International Candidate in UK


kumar112
I have been reading all of the posts about UK Business schools in this forum for quiet some time.I see every one stating it is hard to get visa permit in UK because of the new Visa rules.
i am an international candidate (from India)
I wanted to obtain an good MBA degree accompanied with International experience ,of course with in a certain budget .so i wanted pursue MBA in UK and i have now obtained an offer from Cranfield SOM also.while talking with people from crandfield they showed stats of 83% of placement and still cautioned it depends on individual his work exp etc etc

My understanding was applying to a top tier institution ranked in FT should at least reduce the difficulty of obtaining a work visa.Is the problem common irrespective of the business school you pass out from that you wont get the Visa at all.

Am i walking blind in to the woods here ? i was kind of preparing myself to join this year.
Now people with lot of good GMAT ranks and experience in this discussion forum keep stating it is tough out there.I should take this as a caution and better prepare or completely avoid this ,choose another country.I am really not specific on any country as such.

How do i go about this ?(gauging the visa problem)
because i have taken a loan 25 lacs which is quiet heavy for me if i come back to my country without a job i wont be able to repay it so easily.
I have been reading all of the posts about UK Business schools in this forum for quiet some time.I see every one stating it is hard to get visa permit in UK because of the new Visa rules.
i am an international candidate (from India)
I wanted to obtain an good MBA degree accompanied with International experience ,of course with in a certain budget .so i wanted pursue MBA in UK and i have now obtained an offer from Cranfield SOM also.while talking with people from crandfield they showed stats of 83% of placement and still cautioned it depends on individual his work exp etc etc

My understanding was applying to a top tier institution ranked in FT should at least reduce the difficulty of obtaining a work visa.Is the problem common irrespective of the business school you pass out from that you wont get the Visa at all.

Am i walking blind in to the woods here ? i was kind of preparing myself to join this year.
Now people with lot of good GMAT ranks and experience in this discussion forum keep stating it is tough out there.I should take this as a caution and better prepare or completely avoid this ,choose another country.I am really not specific on any country as such.

How do i go about this ?(gauging the visa problem)
because i have taken a loan 25 lacs which is quiet heavy for me if i come back to my country without a job i wont be able to repay it so easily.
quote
Duncan
I would restate the problem: it's easy to get a visa, but it's hard to get a job offer. MBA hiring is improving in Europe, a lot, but if you want more than 95% confidence of getting a job within 3 months of graduating then you have to study at a top Asian or US school.

Job hunting is different in Europe in at least two ways: it depends more on networking through the school's community and, partly as a result, it is slower. In terms of international mobility, 10 of the 12 best schools for international mobility are in Europe (the others are in Australia). All but one of them is in the top half of the FT 100, and they all have salaries that are well above average. However, on average only around 88% are in work after three months. So, these students do find work, but one in eight is still looking after the third month. The higher salary more than makes up for the delay. However, it means budgeting to make sure you can survive after the MBA if you need to, or being prepared to compromise on a low salary.

Some European schools operate on that level: Bath, Lancaster and UCD for example, get over 90% in work after 3 months but at an average salary around $96k after three years. At Cranfield it is $128k. So, if you add up that difference year after year when it's a better investment to go to Cranfield. But if you can't take the risk then you either need to compromise on salary, which will get you hired faster, or go to a better school like LBS or Said.
I would restate the problem: it's easy to get a visa, but it's hard to get a job offer. MBA hiring is improving in Europe, a lot, but if you want more than 95% confidence of getting a job within 3 months of graduating then you have to study at a top Asian or US school.

Job hunting is different in Europe in at least two ways: it depends more on networking through the school's community and, partly as a result, it is slower. In terms of international mobility, 10 of the 12 best schools for international mobility are in Europe (the others are in Australia). All but one of them is in the top half of the FT 100, and they all have salaries that are well above average. However, on average only around 88% are in work after three months. So, these students do find work, but one in eight is still looking after the third month. The higher salary more than makes up for the delay. However, it means budgeting to make sure you can survive after the MBA if you need to, or being prepared to compromise on a low salary.

Some European schools operate on that level: Bath, Lancaster and UCD for example, get over 90% in work after 3 months but at an average salary around $96k after three years. At Cranfield it is $128k. So, if you add up that difference year after year when it's a better investment to go to Cranfield. But if you can't take the risk then you either need to compromise on salary, which will get you hired faster, or go to a better school like LBS or Said.
quote
So do you imply that students from Lancaster, Bath and UCD get placed into an organization within UK / Ireland or could it be anywhere in the world (checked their international mobility FT ranking), but their home nation, with a compromise on the salary?

[Edited by BathingSmurf on Apr 20, 2015]

So do you imply that students from Lancaster, Bath and UCD get placed into an organization within UK / Ireland or could it be anywhere in the world (checked their international mobility FT ranking), but their home nation, with a compromise on the salary?
quote
Duncan
These programmes provide excellent international mobility, yes. The only ones making compromises would be those have the choice between lower salaries earlier versus higher salaries later. At the level of individuals, I think that's a choice we all make to some slight degree. But in terms of schools, yes people who chose between schools are choosing between different outcomes. The same candidate going to different schools produces a different outcome, with a different valuation. Supply and demand work imperfectly, but any supply clears faster at a low price than at a high price.
These programmes provide excellent international mobility, yes. The only ones making compromises would be those have the choice between lower salaries earlier versus higher salaries later. At the level of individuals, I think that's a choice we all make to some slight degree. But in terms of schools, yes people who chose between schools are choosing between different outcomes. The same candidate going to different schools produces a different outcome, with a different valuation. Supply and demand work imperfectly, but any supply clears faster at a low price than at a high price.
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kumar112
Thanks Duncan for such a detailed reply.slightly moving away from the discussion presented here I am still interested in attending Cranfield Though I have offer of Strathclyde too .similar to the comparison of lower salary vs higher salary.my goals are to move in to consulting or program management (I am form manufacturing/IT). I have got scholarship from Cranfield too.I am waiting to give my gmat in May then I will try said business school but in between should i try for Manchester business school do they vary very much In Achieveing my goals??
Thanks Duncan for such a detailed reply.slightly moving away from the discussion presented here I am still interested in attending Cranfield Though I have offer of Strathclyde too .similar to the comparison of lower salary vs higher salary.my goals are to move in to consulting or program management (I am form manufacturing/IT). I have got scholarship from Cranfield too.I am waiting to give my gmat in May then I will try said business school but in between should i try for Manchester business school do they vary very much In Achieveing my goals??
quote
Duncan
I would not suggest that you consider Strathclyde if Cranfield is an option, but Manchester is a closer choice. I'm a Manchester graduate, so I am biased for the school: it has a higher ranking, a bigger alumni network, a longer course format with more project work, and internship and international exchange options. Because MBS students earn less than Cranfield students on the way in, it also has a higher percentage increase and greater increase in seniority in some years.

That said, Cranfield recruits more senior students, has more successful placement, higher value for money (because of the intense four-term year), slightly better rankings for international mobility, aims achieved and alumni recommendations, and better career support. It also has more UK students and UK-focussed course content, and I think that is an advantage if you want to work in the UK. Speaking personally, I would choose Cranfield over Manchester if I wanted to make a well-supported career jump (into the school's more employer base), and MBS if the goal was harder to reach. MBS is a bit less intensive, and Stage Two is flexible enough to have a long internship and really allow you to focus on the job hunt.

PS I think the higher quality cohort, greater leadership emphasis and better academic experience do make Cranfield a richer experience, but perhaps MBS is safer.

[Edited by Duncan on Apr 20, 2015]

I would not suggest that you consider Strathclyde if Cranfield is an option, but Manchester is a closer choice. I'm a Manchester graduate, so I am biased for the school: it has a higher ranking, a bigger alumni network, a longer course format with more project work, and internship and international exchange options. Because MBS students earn less than Cranfield students on the way in, it also has a higher percentage increase and greater increase in seniority in some years.

That said, Cranfield recruits more senior students, has more successful placement, higher value for money (because of the intense four-term year), slightly better rankings for international mobility, aims achieved and alumni recommendations, and better career support. It also has more UK students and UK-focussed course content, and I think that is an advantage if you want to work in the UK. Speaking personally, I would choose Cranfield over Manchester if I wanted to make a well-supported career jump (into the school's more employer base), and MBS if the goal was harder to reach. MBS is a bit less intensive, and Stage Two is flexible enough to have a long internship and really allow you to focus on the job hunt.

PS I think the higher quality cohort, greater leadership emphasis and better academic experience do make Cranfield a richer experience, but perhaps MBS is safer.

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kumar112
Thanks again for inputs
Thanks again for inputs
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kumar112
I had deferred my admission for Cranfield to this year now after the 'brexit'.is it safe to join Cranfield now ? how do things change for international students especially from india?
I had deferred my admission for Cranfield to this year now after the 'brexit'.is it safe to join Cranfield now ? how do things change for international students especially from india?
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Ayon
@kumar112

Think for yourself. If not anything else - the Brexit will cause a situation of misinformation and uncertainty - that will put off some recruiters who want to hire international students.

The whole Brexit fiasco was because of anti-immigration sentiment in UK. You'd need to convince prospective recruiters that you are better suited for your target job. As an international student it will be tough - as it was before - but with Brexit it may become tougher - that's just my opinion though. It is hard to put a number.
@kumar112

Think for yourself. If not anything else - the Brexit will cause a situation of misinformation and uncertainty - that will put off some recruiters who want to hire international students.

The whole Brexit fiasco was because of anti-immigration sentiment in UK. You'd need to convince prospective recruiters that you are better suited for your target job. As an international student it will be tough - as it was before - but with Brexit it may become tougher - that's just my opinion though. It is hard to put a number.


quote
mba hipste...
For the time being there will be virtually no changes. If you'll be looking to transition into the country, it's always been hard, but as it is right now there's not going to be any immediate changes. Maybe employers might see hiring international MBAs as more risky - due to impending changes in visa laws, etc. - but I haven't heard anything about this happening yet.
For the time being there will be virtually no changes. If you'll be looking to transition into the country, it's always been hard, but as it is right now there's not going to be any immediate changes. Maybe employers might see hiring international MBAs as more risky - due to impending changes in visa laws, etc. - but I haven't heard anything about this happening yet.
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kumar112
Thank you
Thank you
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