WHU or Mannheim


StuartHE

This might depend on the firms you want to target. Generally, Mannheim is the better schools as long as you write and speak German excellently. 

This might depend on the firms you want to target. Generally, Mannheim is the better schools as long as you write and speak German excellently. 
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harolds

Hey guys ,
How would you compare these programs to the MBA from Saint Gallen ?
Cheers

Hey guys ,<br>How would you compare these programs to the MBA from Saint Gallen ?<br>Cheers
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laurie

According to the FT Global MBA ranking, they would rank like this:

1. WHU
2. St. Gallen
3. Mannheim

Salaries are overall very close. Comparing them like this belies the differences in placements and locations, though. St. Gallen is great if you are looking at the Swiss / European financial industry. 

According to the FT Global MBA ranking, they would rank like this:<br><br>1. WHU<br>2. St. Gallen<br>3. Mannheim<br><br>Salaries are overall very close. Comparing them like this belies the differences in placements and locations, though. St. Gallen is great if you are looking at the Swiss / European financial industry.&nbsp;
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StuartHE

The cost of living in Switzerland is very high compared to Germany. Discount the Swiss salary up to 50% to compare with Germany. https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_cities.jsp?country1=Germany&city1=Frankfurt&country2=Switzerland&city2=Zurich

The cost of living in Switzerland is very high compared to Germany. Discount the Swiss salary up to 50% to compare with Germany. https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_cities.jsp?country1=Germany&amp;city1=Frankfurt&amp;country2=Switzerland&amp;city2=Zurich
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JL85

Thanks, Tony! I appreciate your detailed comparison. This is mostly in line with what I read online. 
WHU seems to have a slight edge in terms of recognition. However, the curriculum is indeed concerning since I've also read that it doesn't live up to the expectations of an MBA program.
I'm not sure about the career services though since most alumni rate WHU as better than Mannheim.

Also with regards to sectors that employ from these schools, according to the FT WHU has a wider range of sectors that recruit their grads (excluding consultancy where they're both the same). Any comments on this?


following the conversation as it is relevant to me as well. Might that be that students are younger and find for themselves enough the bachelor and master career events and opportunities?

[quote]Thanks, Tony! I appreciate your detailed comparison. This is mostly in line with what I read online.&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>WHU seems to have a slight edge in terms of recognition. However, the curriculum is indeed concerning since I've also read that it doesn't live up to the expectations of an MBA program.</div><div><br></div><div>I'm not sure about the career services though since most alumni rate WHU as better than Mannheim.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Also with regards to sectors that employ from these schools, according to the FT WHU has a wider range of sectors that recruit their grads (excluding consultancy where they're both the same). Any comments on this?</div> [/quote]<br><br>following the conversation as it is relevant to me as well. Might that be that students are younger and find for themselves enough the bachelor and master career events and opportunities?
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JL85

WHU is a better choice for most people, but read the other threads where these schools are compared. If you write and speak German at a high standard, Mannheim may be better for some employers. 


Hi Duncan,

following the conversation as it is relevant to me as well. So is the other way around also true? That if you are an international student in Mannheim you might have challenges finding a job in an English speaking environment in Germany (not because I can't speak german but because I am targeting international companies as a personal preference)?

[quote]WHU is a better choice for most people, but read the other threads where these schools are compared. If you write and speak German at a high standard, Mannheim may be better for some employers.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Hi Duncan,<br><br>following the conversation as it is relevant to me as well. So is the other way around also true? That if you are an international student in Mannheim you might have challenges finding a job in an English speaking environment in Germany (not because I can't speak german but because I am targeting international companies as a personal preference)?<br><br>
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Duncan

Obviously, if you want to work in Germany and don't speak Germany then spend a year learning German to a high level rather than taking an MBA taught in English.

Obviously, if you want to work in Germany and don't speak Germany then spend a year learning German to a high level rather than taking an MBA taught in English.
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JL85

Obviously, if you want to work in Germany and don't speak Germany then spend a year learning German to a high level rather than taking an MBA taught in English.


I have always worked in English without many issues in Germany. I am not targeting SME obviously. An MBA has to be only in English in my opinion, everywhere

[quote]Obviously, if you want to work in Germany and don't speak Germany then spend a year learning German to a high level rather than taking an MBA taught in English. [/quote]<br><br>I have always worked in English without many issues in Germany. I am not targeting SME obviously. An MBA has to be only in English in my opinion, everywhere
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Duncan

Predictably, I disagree. First, I think there's a great opportunity to deliver MBAs in every country, and not only at people with the highest level of English. We need more MBAs in Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Spanish, Indonesian, Urdu etc. 
Second, most full-time MBA students at top schools in mainland Europe are foreigners who struggle to do business in the local language. In Germany, for example, they need to improve their business German more than their business English. Of course this is not what international applicants want to hear, not is it what business schools are generally prepared to offer. 

Predictably, I disagree. First, I think there's a great opportunity to deliver MBAs in every country, and not only at people with the highest level of English. We need more MBAs in Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Spanish, Indonesian, Urdu etc.&nbsp;<br>Second, most full-time MBA students at top schools in mainland Europe are foreigners who struggle to do business in the local language. In Germany, for example, they need to improve their business German more than their business English. Of course this is not what international applicants want to hear, not is it what business schools are generally prepared to offer.&nbsp;
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JL85

Predictably, I disagree. First, I think there's a great opportunity to deliver MBAs in every country, and not only at people with the highest level of English. We need more MBAs in Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Spanish, Indonesian, Urdu etc. 
Second, most full-time MBA students at top schools in mainland Europe are foreigners who struggle to do business in the local language. In Germany, for example, they need to improve their business German more than their business English. Of course this is not what international applicants want to hear, not is it what business schools are generally prepared to offer. 

Thanks for sharing your opinion. I don’t see it like this, obviously. But it clearly depends also on what you are targeting in terms of companies and career aspirations. Seeing it from another point of you, on a more local level, yes I agree, it would be good to have a bigger offer of MBA education and more graduates also in smaller businesses.

[quote]Predictably, I disagree. First, I think there's a great opportunity to deliver MBAs in every country, and not only at people with the highest level of English. We need more MBAs in Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Spanish, Indonesian, Urdu etc.&nbsp;<br>Second, most full-time MBA students at top schools in mainland Europe are foreigners who struggle to do business in the local language. In Germany, for example, they need to improve their business German more than their business English. Of course this is not what international applicants want to hear, not is it what business schools are generally prepared to offer.&nbsp; [/quote]<br>Thanks for sharing your opinion. I don’t see it like this, obviously. But it clearly depends also on what you are targeting in terms of companies and career aspirations. Seeing it from another point of you, on a more local level, yes I agree, it would be good to have a bigger offer of MBA education and more graduates also in smaller businesses.
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StuartHE

There is a limited need for English-language MBAs who can't speak the local business language. 58% employment after Copenhagen. 59% after ESMT. 67% at Lisbon. I'm amazed you can't see the problem. 


Challenging placement means good schools like TIAS, Politecnico di Milano and HHL have fallen out of the FT rankings, and even better schools like ESCP, WU, Kedge and Neoma can't get their full-time MBAs into the top 100.

These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects. 

[Edited by StuartHE on May 19, 2021]

There is a limited need for English-language MBAs who can't speak the local business language. 58% employment after Copenhagen. 59% after ESMT. 67% at Lisbon. I'm amazed you can't see the problem.&nbsp;<br><br><br>Challenging placement means good schools like TIAS, Politecnico di Milano and HHL have fallen out of the FT rankings, and even better schools like ESCP, WU, Kedge and Neoma can't get their full-time MBAs into the top 100.<br><br>These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects.&nbsp;
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JL85

There is a limited need for English-language MBAs who can't speak the local business language. 58% employment after Copenhagen. 59% after ESMT. 67% at Lisbon. I'm amazed you can't see the problem. 


Challenging placement means good schools like TIAS, Politecnico di Milano and HHL have fallen out of the FT rankings, and even better schools like ESCP, WU, Kedge and Neoma can't get their full-time MBAs into the top 100.

These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects. 


what exactly are you amazed about? ???? i am just saying that an MBA has to be taught in english imo, i am not saying the local language is not important. Furthermore i am saying that i have always (almost always) worked in english in Germany and those are the kind of companies i am targeting. My german is around b2/c1, so it is not a big issue to get up to a professional level in 2 years. It is just not my target. I find it obvious that a decent understanding of local language is needed.

[quote]There is a limited need for English-language MBAs who can't speak the local business language. 58% employment after Copenhagen. 59% after ESMT. 67% at Lisbon. I'm amazed you can't see the problem.&nbsp;<br><br><br>Challenging placement means good schools like TIAS, Politecnico di Milano and HHL have fallen out of the FT rankings, and even better schools like ESCP, WU, Kedge and Neoma can't get their full-time MBAs into the top 100.<br><br>These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>what exactly are you amazed about? ???? i am just saying that an MBA has to be taught in english imo, i am not saying the local language is not important. Furthermore i am saying that i have always (almost always) worked in english in Germany and those are the kind of companies i am targeting. My german is around b2/c1, so it is not a big issue to get up to a professional level in 2 years. It is just not my target. I find it obvious that a decent understanding of local language is needed.
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Duncan

It's super weird to say that a specific body of knowledge should be available only in one language. It's like cranks who don't want translations of the Qur'an. 

It's super weird to say that a specific body of knowledge should be available only in one language. It's like cranks who don't want translations of the Qur'an.&nbsp;
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Razors Edg...

These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects.

That's a great idea. The lack of any possibility for longer internships in European MBA programs (compared to the US) is quite surprising to me, especially considering the bulk of their students come from abroad. 

[quote]These schools need to learn from HHL and add a two year track where the MBA is spread more thinly to allow more time for language learning and in-country projects. [/quote]<br>That's a great idea. The lack of any possibility for longer internships in European MBA programs (compared to the US) is quite surprising to me, especially considering the bulk of their students come from abroad.&nbsp;
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JL85

I already replied to your posts a few minutes ago, but it didn't seem to work. So, once again in a nutshell... 
As I can claim to know both institutions, I cannot share you viewpoints. WHU is a small private university, which is quite unusual in Germany. As a result, their students and alumni seem to be proud of their institution and have a high esprit de corps. But when it comes to hard facts, Mannheim scores higher in nearly all fields.
Rankings: Mannheim is among the top 10 in Europe and the number one in Germany in all international MBA rankings (The Economist, Forbes, Bloomberg, QS), except for the Financial Times. However, when you look at the hard facts like placement, value for money, or research quality, Mannheim even scores higher in this respect in the FT ranking. In national rankings, Mannheim is normally ranked number one, like in the Wirtschaftswoche a few days ago.
Placement: In past years, Mannheim had placement rates >90%. WHU's placement figures are by far lower (see FT ranking).
Value for money: Mannheim ranks higher than WHU in this category in the FT as well.
Post-MBA salary: I could only find the FT ranking and their placement reports as reliable indicators. According to these publications, both schools seem to be on the same level.
Alumni network: Mannheim  is part of a more than 100 year old public university. In addition to their MBA and EMBA network, they have by far more than 500 bachelor and master graduates per year. Mannheim graduates can be found in the boards of many large German companies.
Reputation: Because of its size and its tradition, Mannheim is perceived as the number one in the German speaking world. This is also proved by many rankings, e.g. the Wirtschaftswoche, which is based on a survey among German HR directors.
Location: This is a matter of taste, but I would prefer Mannheim in this respect as well, as it is located very closely to Frankfurt and Stuttgart and is part of a very strong economic region as well.
Faculty quality: Mannheim's faculty is the national number one in nearly all rankings. You normally do not find many WHU professors there.
Selectivity: As far as I can oversee it, Mannheim has a tough selection process, but this normally also leads to a better quality of the students.     


yep this is also what i have noticed in the different rankings, Mannheim is still leading pretty strongly (the Economist for ex the difference is really huge, FT nearly  the same but some important indicators are higher too). But again WHU has a really nice international exchange offers. 

[quote]I already replied to your posts a few minutes ago, but it didn't seem to work. So, once again in a nutshell...&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>As I can claim to know both institutions, I cannot share you viewpoints. WHU is a small private university, which is quite unusual in Germany. As a result, their students and alumni seem to be proud of their institution and have a high esprit de corps. But when it comes to hard facts, Mannheim scores higher in nearly all fields.</div><div><br></div><div>Rankings: Mannheim is among the top 10 in Europe and the number one in Germany in all international MBA rankings (The Economist, Forbes, Bloomberg, QS), except for the Financial Times. However, when you look at the hard facts like placement, value for money, or research quality, Mannheim even scores higher in this respect in the FT ranking. In national rankings, Mannheim is normally ranked number one, like in the Wirtschaftswoche a few days ago.</div><div><br></div><div>Placement: In past years, Mannheim had placement rates &gt;90%. WHU's placement figures are by far lower (see FT ranking).</div><div><br></div><div>Value for money: Mannheim ranks higher than WHU in this category in the FT as well.</div><div><br></div><div>Post-MBA salary: I could only find the FT ranking and their placement reports as reliable indicators. According to these publications, both schools seem to be on the same level.</div><div><br></div><div>Alumni network: Mannheim&nbsp; is part of a more than 100 year old public university. In addition to their MBA and EMBA network, they have by far more than 500 bachelor and master graduates per year. Mannheim graduates can be found in the boards of many large German companies.</div><div><br></div><div>Reputation: Because of its size and its tradition, Mannheim is perceived as the number one in the German speaking world. This is also proved by many rankings, e.g. the Wirtschaftswoche, which is based on a survey among German HR directors.</div><div><br></div><div>Location: This is a matter of taste, but I would prefer Mannheim in this respect as well, as it is located very closely to Frankfurt and Stuttgart and is part of a very strong economic region as well.</div><div><br></div><div>Faculty quality: Mannheim's faculty is the national number one in nearly all rankings. You normally do not find many WHU professors there.</div><div><br></div><div>Selectivity: As far as I can oversee it, Mannheim has a tough selection process, but this normally also leads to a better quality of the students.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</div> [/quote]<br><br>yep this is also what i have noticed in the different rankings, Mannheim is still leading pretty strongly (the Economist for ex the difference is really huge, FT nearly &nbsp;the same but some important indicators are higher too). But again WHU has a really nice international exchange offers.&nbsp;
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