IE vs Warwick vs Imperial vs Katz (Pittsburgh)


I've been admitted to IE's International MBA program and I'm very confident make it to all of these programs for the Full-Time MBA, September 24 intake.

I was delighted to get into IE but then I started communicating with the alums and they all said the same thing:

1) Terrible Career Support team
2) The European Market is bleak
3) IE's admission to the IMBA program is not very selective and honestly, they'd admit anyone, although I don't think that's completely true.

I'm from a consulting background and work for my family-owned management advisory firm in India. My immediate post-MBA goal would be to work in consulting (outside India) and settle aborad. Long-term: Entrepreneurship. Heard good things about Imperial and Warwick. Katz, well, it's a different market altogether but not that well ranked in the US. The location is not a big factor to me and I'm comfortable anywhere. (Even if I end up going to IE, I'll make all the efforts to be fluent in Spanish).

Which one would you choose and why?

I've been admitted to IE's International MBA program and I'm very confident make it to all of these programs for the Full-Time MBA, September 24 intake.

I was delighted to get into IE but then I started communicating with the alums and they all said the same thing:

1) Terrible Career Support team
2) The European Market is bleak
3) IE's admission to the IMBA program is not very selective and honestly, they'd admit anyone, although I don't think that's completely true.

I'm from a consulting background and work for my family-owned management advisory firm in India. My immediate post-MBA goal would be to work in consulting (outside India) and settle aborad. Long-term: Entrepreneurship. Heard good things about Imperial and Warwick. Katz, well, it's a different market altogether but not that well ranked in the US. The location is not a big factor to me and I'm comfortable anywhere. (Even if I end up going to IE, I'll make all the efforts to be fluent in Spanish).

Which one would you choose and why?
quote
Duncan

I don't think you've thought deeply enough about the practicalities.

Suppose you're not fluent in Spanish now, or in Italian or Portuguese. In that case, you won't be at a professional level in Spanish at the end of a demanding masters taught in English on a largely English-speaking campus.

Where outside India is there [a] a market stronger than Europe where you'd be able to settle long-term and [c] want to live? The odds of getting a US green card are very slim. Spain has a much better growth forecast than the UK.

I don't think you've thought deeply enough about the practicalities.

Suppose you're not fluent in Spanish now, or in Italian or Portuguese. In that case, you won't be at a professional level in Spanish at the end of a demanding masters taught in English on a largely English-speaking campus.

Where outside India is there [a] a market stronger than Europe where [b] you'd be able to settle long-term and [c] want to live? The odds of getting a US green card are very slim. Spain has a much better growth forecast than the UK.
quote

I don't think you've thought deeply enough about the practicalities.

Suppose you're not fluent in Spanish now, or in Italian or Portuguese. In that case, you won't be at a professional level in Spanish at the end of a demanding masters taught in English on a largely English-speaking campus.

Where outside India is there [a] a market stronger than Europe where you'd be able to settle long-term and [c] want to live? The odds of getting a US green card are very slim. Spain has a much better growth forecast than the UK.


Thanks for your response, Duncan. But what's your conclusion regarding my query? Let's assume for one minute that these are the only options that I have and the likelihood of working immediately outside India and eventually settling there, are my ambitions. Which one should I choose and why? Reputation is something I deeply care about because we'll be carrying this brand name for all our lives.

Yes, the UK market is even more messed up as of now and is at the brink of recession as well. IE then?

[quote]I don't think you've thought deeply enough about the practicalities.

Suppose you're not fluent in Spanish now, or in Italian or Portuguese. In that case, you won't be at a professional level in Spanish at the end of a demanding masters taught in English on a largely English-speaking campus.

Where outside India is there [a] a market stronger than Europe where [b] you'd be able to settle long-term and [c] want to live? The odds of getting a US green card are very slim. Spain has a much better growth forecast than the UK. [/quote]

Thanks for your response, Duncan. But what's your conclusion regarding my query? Let's assume for one minute that these are the only options that I have and the likelihood of working immediately outside India and eventually settling there, are my ambitions. Which one should I choose and why? Reputation is something I deeply care about because we'll be carrying this brand name for all our lives.

Yes, the UK market is even more messed up as of now and is at the brink of recession as well. IE then?
quote
Duncan

Well, these are not the only three schools so I don't accept the premise. I am not sure that any of these schools open a route to your goal.

Well, these are not the only three schools so I don't accept the premise. I am not sure that any of these schools open a route to your goal.
quote
Duncan

Weighing these up as options for settling long-term:

IE - Huge language barrier. If you were in Spain now working full-time in an intensive language programme.... But then you're competing with fluent Latin Americans with much less attractive options in the domestic markets.

Warwick or Imperial: Generic UK problems. You won't get into a top strategy firm that way, but maybe Big Four accounting firms' advisory teams. See https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1942720

Katz: You just won't get a long-term visa there. In an intensive one-year MBA you won't find an American to marry you unless you want to marry out. Pittsburgh has a tiny Indian community, for example. GWU, Questrom, Fuqua, Fisher, Olin, Merage, Simon, Caroll, Olin.... these would be better schools for finding a wife.

PS So, of these, the UK schools are the best bad option.

[Edited by Duncan on Nov 23, 2023]

Weighing these up as options for settling long-term:<br>
IE - Huge language barrier. If you were in Spain now working full-time in an intensive language programme.... But then you're competing with fluent Latin Americans with much less attractive options in the domestic markets. <br>
Warwick or Imperial: Generic UK problems. You won't get into a top strategy firm that way, but maybe Big Four accounting firms' advisory teams. See https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1942720 <br>
Katz: You just won't get a long-term visa there. In an intensive one-year MBA you won't find an American to marry you unless you want to marry out. Pittsburgh has a tiny Indian community, for example. GWU, Questrom, Fuqua, Fisher, Olin, Merage, Simon, Caroll, Olin.... these would be better schools for finding a wife.

PS So, of these, the UK schools are the best bad option.
quote

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