current status of German full time MBAs (HSG/WHU)


Hello,


i would like to know the experts´ opinion on the current status of the full time MBAs of St. Gallen and WHU in the DACH market. I have been reading in this forum some criticism and rough statements concerning the HSG full time MBA, whereas the WHU seems to be doing really good. Would you be able to provide further data on these MBAs as of 2021 (post-pandemic period). They are currently in my list to apply but I have some doubts.


thanks in advance

[Edited by jorge campal on Oct 19, 2021]

Hello,<br><br>
i would like to know the experts´ opinion on the current status of the full time MBAs of St. Gallen and WHU in the DACH market. I have been reading in this forum some criticism and rough statements concerning the HSG full time MBA, whereas the WHU seems to be doing really good. Would you be able to provide further data on these MBAs as of 2021 (post-pandemic period). They are currently in my list to apply but I have some doubts.<br><br>
thanks in advance
quote
DACHMBA

What are your goals? Why Germany?

What are your goals? Why Germany?
quote
Duncan

To be honest, I think it's better to say that there are rough comments about the expectations of applicants and admitted students who don't speak German and magically expect to be able to find work in German or Swiss-German organisations after a year in an intensive programme taught in English. My second post on this thread, from 2013, sums up the situation: https://find-mba.com/board/europe/do-you-need-to-speak-the-local-language-29546 

Indeed, HSG like many other schools (Copenhagen is a great example) is seeing falling demand for MBAs who don't speak the local language. I think that's mostly about the linguistic and cultural ease with which MBAs can add value to companies, and the increasingly limited value that MBAs can add relative to local MSc students who speak two or three European languages.


PS It's also about the limited interest of candidates in longer-format MBAs, like the 18 to 24 months tracks at ESADE, Pforzheim and HHL, which can better support language learning. That's also reflected in the shortening duration of many MBAs, such as RSM and HEC, and the addition of fast track options. 

[Edited by Duncan on Oct 19, 2021]

To be honest, I think it's better to say that there are rough comments about the expectations of applicants and admitted students who don't speak German and magically expect to be able to find work in German or Swiss-German organisations after a year in an intensive programme taught in English. My second post on this thread, from 2013, sums up the situation: https://find-mba.com/board/europe/do-you-need-to-speak-the-local-language-29546&nbsp;<br><br>Indeed, HSG like many other schools (Copenhagen is a great example) is seeing falling demand for MBAs who don't speak the local language. I think that's mostly about the linguistic and cultural ease with which MBAs can add value to companies, and the increasingly limited value that MBAs can add relative to local MSc students who speak two or three European languages.<br><br><br>PS It's also about the limited interest of candidates in longer-format MBAs, like the 18 to 24 months tracks at ESADE, Pforzheim and HHL, which can better&nbsp;support language learning. That's also reflected in the shortening duration of many MBAs, such as RSM and HEC, and the addition of fast track options.&nbsp;
quote
laurie

Yes, there's a lot more nuance around these 'rough statements.' 

It's a couple of factors: applicants from the developing world often see mainland Europe as an affordable alternative to the long-standing tradition of studying in the US or the UK (as a way to transition to those countries). However, many do not understand that even if schools in those mainland European countries offer programs in English, it's exceedingly difficult to work there without having a good command of the local language.

Of course, it does happen that people can find jobs in English-speaking companies doing business in Mainland Europe, but I would say that this is probably not the norm.

So, it always comes down to: (1) what your goals are in pursing a degree from a school like HSG, and (2) if those goals involve settling down in Switzerland, your command of German / French. 

Yes, there's a lot more nuance around these 'rough statements.'&nbsp;<br><br>It's a couple of factors: applicants from the developing world often see mainland Europe as an affordable alternative to the long-standing tradition of studying in the US or the UK (as a way to transition to those countries). However, many do not understand that even if schools in those mainland European countries offer programs in English, it's exceedingly difficult to work there without having a good command of the local language.<br><br>Of course, it does happen that people can find jobs in English-speaking companies doing business in Mainland Europe, but I would say that this is probably not the norm.<br><br>So, it always comes down to: (1) what your goals are in pursing a degree from a school like HSG, and (2) if those goals involve settling down in Switzerland, your command of German / French.&nbsp;
quote

Reply to Post

Related Business Schools

St. Gallen, Switzerland 40 Followers 134 Discussions
Düsseldorf, Germany 76 Followers 199 Discussions

Other Related Content

Jun 07, 2021

Access Online to Hold Global MBA Online Events in June and July

News Jun 07, 2021

MBA Programs in Germany: A Gateway to Europe

Article May 20, 2013

How an emerging class of top German business schools is helping international students tap into the country's growing economy

Hot Discussions