Americans: Why Europe?


sally

I'm an American looking to get an MBA in Spain. I have a phone interview next week with one of the universities I have applied to. I am sure they will ask me why I want to study in Spain.. and specifically at their unversity.

On the "Why Spain" part my honest reasons are that it is a beautiful country, that I want to experience European culture (In Spain, and on trips I could make outside of the country while I'm livingthere.), and I think it could help me improve my Spanish.

However, this particular program is in Barcelona, so, arguably, I could learn Spanish better in Madrid, or a South American country where it is the sole primary language. (The program I'm applying to is in English, by the way. I don't speak much Spanish, so a Spanish language program would be a bit too much, I think. But I would like to take Spanish language classes while I'm there.)

Also, I am interested in potentially working in Spain or another EU country after graduation. However, if asked "why" I could only say it's because I admire European culture, and it seems like a nice place to live! Also, I feel that life is too short to live your whole life in one place. So I am interested in going abroad.

At any rate, I am not sure if these reasons alone are very good ones to give during an interview. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what to say on why one might be interested in getting a degree in Europe. Maybe some of you could share why (or why you said, anyway) you are/were interested in getting a degree abroad?

Thank you!

I'm an American looking to get an MBA in Spain. I have a phone interview next week with one of the universities I have applied to. I am sure they will ask me why I want to study in Spain.. and specifically at their unversity.

On the "Why Spain" part my honest reasons are that it is a beautiful country, that I want to experience European culture (In Spain, and on trips I could make outside of the country while I'm livingthere.), and I think it could help me improve my Spanish.

However, this particular program is in Barcelona, so, arguably, I could learn Spanish better in Madrid, or a South American country where it is the sole primary language. (The program I'm applying to is in English, by the way. I don't speak much Spanish, so a Spanish language program would be a bit too much, I think. But I would like to take Spanish language classes while I'm there.)

Also, I am interested in potentially working in Spain or another EU country after graduation. However, if asked "why" I could only say it's because I admire European culture, and it seems like a nice place to live! Also, I feel that life is too short to live your whole life in one place. So I am interested in going abroad.

At any rate, I am not sure if these reasons alone are very good ones to give during an interview. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what to say on why one might be interested in getting a degree in Europe. Maybe some of you could share why (or why you said, anyway) you are/were interested in getting a degree abroad?

Thank you!
quote
Evan2007

Hi Sally - I think if you're applying to a top Spanish school like IESE, ESADE, or IE, you'll probably need to come up with reasons beyond that it seems like a nice place to live.

When I was looking at business schools in Europe, I was interested in this one school in Germany. I was speaking to one of their admin reps, and suddenly she asked me "so why do you want to come to Germany"? I was like, "uh..." and I spouted out some nonsense about industrialization or something. She kind of smiled, handed me her brochure, and said that I should maybe think about it some more. Kind of embarrassing, but she was right.

I think if you do some research about the major companies and industries in the area, that should be a good start. A little research could go a long way. I think some local knowledge is a good way to stand out in an interview, and it shows some genuine interest. Evan

Hi Sally - I think if you're applying to a top Spanish school like IESE, ESADE, or IE, you'll probably need to come up with reasons beyond that it seems like a nice place to live.

When I was looking at business schools in Europe, I was interested in this one school in Germany. I was speaking to one of their admin reps, and suddenly she asked me "so why do you want to come to Germany"? I was like, "uh..." and I spouted out some nonsense about industrialization or something. She kind of smiled, handed me her brochure, and said that I should maybe think about it some more. Kind of embarrassing, but she was right.

I think if you do some research about the major companies and industries in the area, that should be a good start. A little research could go a long way. I think some local knowledge is a good way to stand out in an interview, and it shows some genuine interest. Evan
quote
sally

Yes, I figured I would need to come up with something better than the "nice place to live" line. (Another personal motivation I forgot to mention is that the American Midwest is terminally depressing.. at least if you've been here as long as I have.. but I don't think that's going to cut it either.)

That's a good idea about researching local industry, and the Spanish economy in general. I am on it! I have also been trying to find out more about the school itself, but I'm kind of limited to what I can find out on the Internet.

I have applied, or am applying, to all the big Spanish schools. This particular interview is with EADA, if you were wondering, which I think is fairly selective. ( I am a bit iffy about saying which schools I'm applying to on here because I'm half afraid that admissions officers are trolling around these message boards. Hopefully they won't recognize me.. or mind.)

At any rate, thanks again for the good advice! I'll post on here once I figure out what I'm going to say and/or after I've completed the interview.

Yes, I figured I would need to come up with something better than the "nice place to live" line. (Another personal motivation I forgot to mention is that the American Midwest is terminally depressing.. at least if you've been here as long as I have.. but I don't think that's going to cut it either.)

That's a good idea about researching local industry, and the Spanish economy in general. I am on it! I have also been trying to find out more about the school itself, but I'm kind of limited to what I can find out on the Internet.

I have applied, or am applying, to all the big Spanish schools. This particular interview is with EADA, if you were wondering, which I think is fairly selective. ( I am a bit iffy about saying which schools I'm applying to on here because I'm half afraid that admissions officers are trolling around these message boards. Hopefully they won't recognize me.. or mind.)

At any rate, thanks again for the good advice! I'll post on here once I figure out what I'm going to say and/or after I've completed the interview.
quote
mba101

What a great heads-up on a question to think about before interviews. I am from the U.S. too. I have been researching the "conduct" of business in Europe. Seems to be much more ethical behavior and an "old" tradition based economy. Plus the fast adoption of three/four day work weeks. This is why I want to head across the pond (and of course, the beauiful views!).

Have you found the language barrier to be a problem for you in the interview process? I do not speak French or Spanish fluently.

What a great heads-up on a question to think about before interviews. I am from the U.S. too. I have been researching the "conduct" of business in Europe. Seems to be much more ethical behavior and an "old" tradition based economy. Plus the fast adoption of three/four day work weeks. This is why I want to head across the pond (and of course, the beauiful views!).

Have you found the language barrier to be a problem for you in the interview process? I do not speak French or Spanish fluently.
quote
andy.j.

Plus the fast adoption of three/four day work weeks.


Great reason! but i wouldn't say that in the interview ;-)

<blockquote> Plus the fast adoption of three/four day work weeks. </blockquote>

Great reason! but i wouldn't say that in the interview ;-)
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

I'm an American looking to get an MBA in Spain. I have a phone interview next week with one of the universities I have applied to. I am sure they will ask me why I want to study in Spain.. and specifically at their unversity.

On the "Why Spain" part my honest reasons are that it is a beautiful country, that I want to experience European culture (In Spain, and on trips I could make outside of the country while I'm livingthere.), and I think it could help me improve my Spanish.

However, this particular program is in Barcelona, so, arguably, I could learn Spanish better in Madrid, or a South American country where it is the sole primary language. (The program I'm applying to is in English, by the way. I don't speak much Spanish, so a Spanish language program would be a bit too much, I think. But I would like to take Spanish language classes while I'm there.)

Also, I am interested in potentially working in Spain or another EU country after graduation. However, if asked "why" I could only say it's because I admire European culture, and it seems like a nice place to live! Also, I feel that life is too short to live your whole life in one place. So I am interested in going abroad.

At any rate, I am not sure if these reasons alone are very good ones to give during an interview. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what to say on why one might be interested in getting a degree in Europe. Maybe some of you could share why (or why you said, anyway) you are/were interested in getting a degree abroad?

Thank you!


I agree with the other poster. Just wanting to live in another country is not a great answer in an interview. And please...don't even mention the 3 - 4 holiday thing, ha ha. Maybe you can say something like, you want to apply your skills and expand your credentials into the European market. Talk about recent industrial developments (someone's mentioned this already), talk about how SPain applies to your current role, etc. And since you're speaking with Spaniards, you can kiss-ass a little and talk about how you think Spain is at the forefront of the European market and there's a lot you can take advantage of (may or may not be true, but whatever you do, you can always find your own niche market). Studying in SPain would be the best way for you to develop a local network, become immersed in the culture and be more prepared to establish your career in Spain post-MBA. Then as a joke, you can mention the weather.

<blockquote>I'm an American looking to get an MBA in Spain. I have a phone interview next week with one of the universities I have applied to. I am sure they will ask me why I want to study in Spain.. and specifically at their unversity.

On the "Why Spain" part my honest reasons are that it is a beautiful country, that I want to experience European culture (In Spain, and on trips I could make outside of the country while I'm livingthere.), and I think it could help me improve my Spanish.

However, this particular program is in Barcelona, so, arguably, I could learn Spanish better in Madrid, or a South American country where it is the sole primary language. (The program I'm applying to is in English, by the way. I don't speak much Spanish, so a Spanish language program would be a bit too much, I think. But I would like to take Spanish language classes while I'm there.)

Also, I am interested in potentially working in Spain or another EU country after graduation. However, if asked "why" I could only say it's because I admire European culture, and it seems like a nice place to live! Also, I feel that life is too short to live your whole life in one place. So I am interested in going abroad.

At any rate, I am not sure if these reasons alone are very good ones to give during an interview. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what to say on why one might be interested in getting a degree in Europe. Maybe some of you could share why (or why you said, anyway) you are/were interested in getting a degree abroad?

Thank you!</blockquote>

I agree with the other poster. Just wanting to live in another country is not a great answer in an interview. And please...don't even mention the 3 - 4 holiday thing, ha ha. Maybe you can say something like, you want to apply your skills and expand your credentials into the European market. Talk about recent industrial developments (someone's mentioned this already), talk about how SPain applies to your current role, etc. And since you're speaking with Spaniards, you can kiss-ass a little and talk about how you think Spain is at the forefront of the European market and there's a lot you can take advantage of (may or may not be true, but whatever you do, you can always find your own niche market). Studying in SPain would be the best way for you to develop a local network, become immersed in the culture and be more prepared to establish your career in Spain post-MBA. Then as a joke, you can mention the weather.
quote
Evan2007

3- or 4-day weeks? What? I've never heard of that as a particularly European thing.

3- or 4-day weeks? What? I've never heard of that as a particularly European thing.
quote
sally

Me neither! Afternoon seistas sound nice though! And, I was reading that in the summer people go into work extra early so they don't have to come back to work after siesta!

At any rate, I had the interview, and the interviewer wasn't too probing about why I want to come to Spain. I basically told him that I want to get more international experience, being someone that to date has lived my entire life in the US. I think I also said something about how in today's global environement, its important to for managers to have some understanding of other cultures.

I had read up a little on the Spanish economy, but didn't really get a chance to talk about it :P

I was suprised that the interview was not very conversational at all.. it was like the guy was filling out a questionaire. I would say a couple sentences in response to a question; and he'd be like "OK, next."

In response to the person who asked, there was not much of a language problem. The entire interview was in English, of course. The interviewer was very fluent, however there were a few cases where I couldn't understand his pronounciation and was kind of embarrased to have to ask him to repeat himself.

Anyway, I got in! Now I just have to make a decision....

Me neither! Afternoon seistas sound nice though! And, I was reading that in the summer people go into work extra early so they don't have to come back to work after siesta!

At any rate, I had the interview, and the interviewer wasn't too probing about why I want to come to Spain. I basically told him that I want to get more international experience, being someone that to date has lived my entire life in the US. I think I also said something about how in today's global environement, its important to for managers to have some understanding of other cultures.

I had read up a little on the Spanish economy, but didn't really get a chance to talk about it :P

I was suprised that the interview was not very conversational at all.. it was like the guy was filling out a questionaire. I would say a couple sentences in response to a question; and he'd be like "OK, next."

In response to the person who asked, there was not much of a language problem. The entire interview was in English, of course. The interviewer was very fluent, however there were a few cases where I couldn't understand his pronounciation and was kind of embarrased to have to ask him to repeat himself.

Anyway, I got in! Now I just have to make a decision....
quote
mba101

GREAT!! congrats...

GREAT!! congrats...
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

Me neither! Afternoon seistas sound nice though! And, I was reading that in the summer people go into work extra early so they don't have to come back to work after siesta!

At any rate, I had the interview, and the interviewer wasn't too probing about why I want to come to Spain. I basically told him that I want to get more international experience, being someone that to date has lived my entire life in the US. I think I also said something about how in today's global environement, its important to for managers to have some understanding of other cultures.

I had read up a little on the Spanish economy, but didn't really get a chance to talk about it :P

I was suprised that the interview was not very conversational at all.. it was like the guy was filling out a questionaire. I would say a couple sentences in response to a question; and he'd be like "OK, next."

In response to the person who asked, there was not much of a language problem. The entire interview was in English, of course. The interviewer was very fluent, however there were a few cases where I couldn't understand his pronounciation and was kind of embarrased to have to ask him to repeat himself.

Anyway, I got in! Now I just have to make a decision....


Congrats Sally! which school is this? And thanks of letting us know about your experience.

<blockquote>Me neither! Afternoon seistas sound nice though! And, I was reading that in the summer people go into work extra early so they don't have to come back to work after siesta!

At any rate, I had the interview, and the interviewer wasn't too probing about why I want to come to Spain. I basically told him that I want to get more international experience, being someone that to date has lived my entire life in the US. I think I also said something about how in today's global environement, its important to for managers to have some understanding of other cultures.

I had read up a little on the Spanish economy, but didn't really get a chance to talk about it :P

I was suprised that the interview was not very conversational at all.. it was like the guy was filling out a questionaire. I would say a couple sentences in response to a question; and he'd be like "OK, next."

In response to the person who asked, there was not much of a language problem. The entire interview was in English, of course. The interviewer was very fluent, however there were a few cases where I couldn't understand his pronounciation and was kind of embarrased to have to ask him to repeat himself.

Anyway, I got in! Now I just have to make a decision....
</blockquote>

Congrats Sally! which school is this? And thanks of letting us know about your experience.
quote
sally

It was EADA...

Also, if anyone is curious, here are some of the questions they asked. You only had a couple minutes to answer each one. (there were additional questions, but these are the ones I remember):

What do you hope to get out of an MBA?
Have you ever lived abroad?
What are your best qualities?
If you could change one thing about yourself what would it be?
If you could meet any famous person who would it be?
What do you do in your current job?
If you were going to hire someone for your current position what qualities would you look for?
If you were mayor of your city what would you change?
Which animal would you be?
What is your best quality when working in a group setting?
Describe a perfect day for you.
Have you had many changes in your life?
What's the best decision you have ever made?
If I gave you a brick, what would you do with it?
What will you remember about this interview?
If you could use one word to describe this interview what would it be?

It was EADA...

Also, if anyone is curious, here are some of the questions they asked. You only had a couple minutes to answer each one. (there were additional questions, but these are the ones I remember):

What do you hope to get out of an MBA?
Have you ever lived abroad?
What are your best qualities?
If you could change one thing about yourself what would it be?
If you could meet any famous person who would it be?
What do you do in your current job?
If you were going to hire someone for your current position what qualities would you look for?
If you were mayor of your city what would you change?
Which animal would you be?
What is your best quality when working in a group setting?
Describe a perfect day for you.
Have you had many changes in your life?
What's the best decision you have ever made?
If I gave you a brick, what would you do with it?
What will you remember about this interview?
If you could use one word to describe this interview what would it be?
quote
sally

PS I wouldn't get to take advantage of the 3-4 day work weeks, if they do exist.... EADA's 10 month program is five days as week six hours a day! Add study time and there's not much time for relaxing!

PS I wouldn't get to take advantage of the 3-4 day work weeks, if they do exist.... EADA's 10 month program is five days as week six hours a day! Add study time and there's not much time for relaxing!
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

It was EADA...

Also, if anyone is curious, here are some of the questions they asked. You only had a couple minutes to answer each one. (there were additional questions, but these are the ones I remember):

What do you hope to get out of an MBA?
Have you ever lived abroad?
What are your best qualities?
If you could change one thing about yourself what would it be?
If you could meet any famous person who would it be?
What do you do in your current job?
If you were going to hire someone for your current position what qualities would you look for?
If you were mayor of your city what would you change?
Which animal would you be?
What is your best quality when working in a group setting?
Describe a perfect day for you.
Have you had many changes in your life?
What's the best decision you have ever made?
If I gave you a brick, what would you do with it?
What will you remember about this interview?
If you could use one word to describe this interview what would it be?


Those are some very creative questions, ha ha. If I gave you a brick what you would do with it??? I've never heard of that one! But seems like they were trying to tap into your innovative side. Quite cool. Do you think these questions are typical of European schools?

<blockquote>It was EADA...

Also, if anyone is curious, here are some of the questions they asked. You only had a couple minutes to answer each one. (there were additional questions, but these are the ones I remember):

What do you hope to get out of an MBA?
Have you ever lived abroad?
What are your best qualities?
If you could change one thing about yourself what would it be?
If you could meet any famous person who would it be?
What do you do in your current job?
If you were going to hire someone for your current position what qualities would you look for?
If you were mayor of your city what would you change?
Which animal would you be?
What is your best quality when working in a group setting?
Describe a perfect day for you.
Have you had many changes in your life?
What's the best decision you have ever made?
If I gave you a brick, what would you do with it?
What will you remember about this interview?
If you could use one word to describe this interview what would it be?</blockquote>

Those are some very creative questions, ha ha. If I gave you a brick what you would do with it??? I've never heard of that one! But seems like they were trying to tap into your innovative side. Quite cool. Do you think these questions are typical of European schools?
quote
sally

I know! Those kinds of questions can really put you on the spot.

Anyone have any good answers to the brick question? That one really threw me off.

I don't know if that's a typical European MBA interview. It's the first one that I've done. I did another interview with an American university, though, and it was totally different. In that one, the interviewer only asked a few questions and let me talk. They were basics like "Why this school", "What do you want to do with your MBA", "what are your short term career goals," etc. He also asked me for my questions about the university and spent a lot of time talking himself. The EADA interview was definitely more nerve wracking. I thought I had bombed it, but I guess I did OK!

I know! Those kinds of questions can really put you on the spot.

Anyone have any good answers to the brick question? That one really threw me off.

I don't know if that's a typical European MBA interview. It's the first one that I've done. I did another interview with an American university, though, and it was totally different. In that one, the interviewer only asked a few questions and let me talk. They were basics like "Why this school", "What do you want to do with your MBA", "what are your short term career goals," etc. He also asked me for my questions about the university and spent a lot of time talking himself. The EADA interview was definitely more nerve wracking. I thought I had bombed it, but I guess I did OK!
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

I know! Those kinds of questions can really put you on the spot.

Anyone have any good answers to the brick question? That one really threw me off.

I don't know if that's a typical European MBA interview. It's the first one that I've done. I did another interview with an American university, though, and it was totally different. In that one, the interviewer only asked a few questions and let me talk. They were basics like "Why this school", "What do you want to do with your MBA", "what are your short term career goals," etc. He also asked me for my questions about the university and spent a lot of time talking himself. The EADA interview was definitely more nerve wracking. I thought I had bombed it, but I guess I did OK!


Yeah, most of the American schools will probably just ask the typical questions-- why MBA? Why this school? What are your strenghts and weaknesses. But it also depends on where the school is on the spectrum of selectivity (when it comes to interviews). Some schools are very probing.

As for the brick question--I think it doesn't really matter so much what you tell them. You can just totally fudge an answer. Besides tapping into your innovation, they probably wanted to see how you react. Some people can totally break down over a question like that. Probably more a test to see if you'd keep your cool.

<blockquote>I know! Those kinds of questions can really put you on the spot.

Anyone have any good answers to the brick question? That one really threw me off.

I don't know if that's a typical European MBA interview. It's the first one that I've done. I did another interview with an American university, though, and it was totally different. In that one, the interviewer only asked a few questions and let me talk. They were basics like "Why this school", "What do you want to do with your MBA", "what are your short term career goals," etc. He also asked me for my questions about the university and spent a lot of time talking himself. The EADA interview was definitely more nerve wracking. I thought I had bombed it, but I guess I did OK!</blockquote>

Yeah, most of the American schools will probably just ask the typical questions-- why MBA? Why this school? What are your strenghts and weaknesses. But it also depends on where the school is on the spectrum of selectivity (when it comes to interviews). Some schools are very probing.

As for the brick question--I think it doesn't really matter so much what you tell them. You can just totally fudge an answer. Besides tapping into your innovation, they probably wanted to see how you react. Some people can totally break down over a question like that. Probably more a test to see if you'd keep your cool.
quote
sally

I said I'd put it in my garden, hah. The interviewer said "Sure! Why not!" hah.

That is probably what I'd actually do.. as it could be added to a collection of other random bricks and rocks that i've set around. the other thing I actually might do would be... get rid of it, or try to give it back hah.

I guess my answers show how literal I am!

Anyone have anything more imaginative?

I said I'd put it in my garden, hah. The interviewer said "Sure! Why not!" hah.

That is probably what I'd actually do.. as it could be added to a collection of other random bricks and rocks that i've set around. the other thing I actually might do would be... get rid of it, or try to give it back hah.

I guess my answers show how literal I am!

Anyone have anything more imaginative?
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

I said I'd put it in my garden, hah. The interviewer said "Sure! Why not!" hah.

That is probably what I'd actually do.. as it could be added to a collection of other random bricks and rocks that i've set around. the other thing I actually might do would be... get rid of it, or try to give it back hah.

I guess my answers show how literal I am!

Anyone have anything more imaginative?


Doorstop? Paper weight? Foot rest? Special ancient Chinese style posture-pedic pillow?

<blockquote>I said I'd put it in my garden, hah. The interviewer said "Sure! Why not!" hah.

That is probably what I'd actually do.. as it could be added to a collection of other random bricks and rocks that i've set around. the other thing I actually might do would be... get rid of it, or try to give it back hah.

I guess my answers show how literal I am!

Anyone have anything more imaginative?</blockquote>

Doorstop? Paper weight? Foot rest? Special ancient Chinese style posture-pedic pillow?
quote
sally

I found a couple articles on this topic.. however this one assumes you have more than one brick, it seems:
http://open-source-innovation.com/forty-uses-for-a-brick/

And this one is just being funny:
http://www.blinman.com/brick.htm

Although I like the idea behind this suggestion "Fair swap for two half-bricks." Except I'd alter it a bit. Instead, I'd put it on craigslist and see what someone is willing to barter for it!

Remember that guy who started with a paper clip and traded his way all the way up to getting a house?

If not: http://oneredpaperclip.blogspot.com/

I found a couple articles on this topic.. however this one assumes you have more than one brick, it seems:
http://open-source-innovation.com/forty-uses-for-a-brick/

And this one is just being funny:
http://www.blinman.com/brick.htm

Although I like the idea behind this suggestion "Fair swap for two half-bricks." Except I'd alter it a bit. Instead, I'd put it on craigslist and see what someone is willing to barter for it!

Remember that guy who started with a paper clip and traded his way all the way up to getting a house?

If not: http://oneredpaperclip.blogspot.com/
quote

quote
sally

I posted all the questions i could remember above. Those were most of the harder ones (for me, anyway).. i'd definitely pick a famous person you'd like to meet, and an animal you'd like to be and why before the interview!

As i said, it was like he was filling out a questionaire.. so you don't have to have lengthy answers. just a couple sentences. He won't ask you to expand, and then you move on.

The interviewer didn't do much to make me feel at ease... i would say something sarcastic or make light of something and he would NOT laugh or really respond at all. So, that just made my own nervous laughter that much more awkward.

But, despite that, it was pretty straightforward and painless... just a bunch of weird hypothetical brain-tester type questions that can catch you off guard. Like someone else said, it's like they're trying to see how good you are at being put on the spot and pulling something out of the air..

Anyway, let me know if there's anything else you want to know -- good luck!

Sally.

I posted all the questions i could remember above. Those were most of the harder ones (for me, anyway).. i'd definitely pick a famous person you'd like to meet, and an animal you'd like to be and why before the interview!

As i said, it was like he was filling out a questionaire.. so you don't have to have lengthy answers. just a couple sentences. He won't ask you to expand, and then you move on.

The interviewer didn't do much to make me feel at ease... i would say something sarcastic or make light of something and he would NOT laugh or really respond at all. So, that just made my own nervous laughter that much more awkward.

But, despite that, it was pretty straightforward and painless... just a bunch of weird hypothetical brain-tester type questions that can catch you off guard. Like someone else said, it's like they're trying to see how good you are at being put on the spot and pulling something out of the air..

Anyway, let me know if there's anything else you want to know -- good luck!

Sally.
quote

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