MBA in Japan for American Expat


Hello,

I have found this forum very useful to find basic information about MBA programs, in terms of international accreditation, rankings, etc.

However, I have a very specific question that I was hoping that people could help me with.

I am an American currently based in Tokyo working for an English language training school. For the next step in my career I would like to do an MBA. I am quite comfortable in Japan, my wife is Japanese and I have picked up the language fundamentals (although I wouldn't consider myself completely fluent yet), so I was considering options here.

My basic question is this: of the schools that have international accreditation in Japan and also offer full time MBA programs (Nagoya, Keio) - which one is considered the best in terms of international reputation and academics?

The Keio program is interesting to me, but of course it's in Japanese and I would probably need another year of language training to get me to a level where I could perform adequately in the course. Commute-wise I could find a way to make it work without relocating from Tokyo (which would be good for family reasons).

Nagoya is another option, it's in English so I wouldn't have to worry about more Japanese classes now, but of course we would have to relocate. It's not ideal but if it's a better MBA then it would be worth it.

Two more possibilities are the part time MBAs from Temple and McGill. However, I am not sure about whether one of these would be good for me if I'm planning on staying in Japan.

I've also heard here that Manchester Business School at one point offered an MBA in Japan. I can't seem to find any recent info about this. If they still offer this program that's an option too I suppose.

Any advice???
Hello,

I have found this forum very useful to find basic information about MBA programs, in terms of international accreditation, rankings, etc.

However, I have a very specific question that I was hoping that people could help me with.

I am an American currently based in Tokyo working for an English language training school. For the next step in my career I would like to do an MBA. I am quite comfortable in Japan, my wife is Japanese and I have picked up the language fundamentals (although I wouldn't consider myself completely fluent yet), so I was considering options here.

My basic question is this: of the schools that have international accreditation in Japan and also offer full time MBA programs (Nagoya, Keio) - which one is considered the best in terms of international reputation and academics?

The Keio program is interesting to me, but of course it's in Japanese and I would probably need another year of language training to get me to a level where I could perform adequately in the course. Commute-wise I could find a way to make it work without relocating from Tokyo (which would be good for family reasons).

Nagoya is another option, it's in English so I wouldn't have to worry about more Japanese classes now, but of course we would have to relocate. It's not ideal but if it's a better MBA then it would be worth it.

Two more possibilities are the part time MBAs from Temple and McGill. However, I am not sure about whether one of these would be good for me if I'm planning on staying in Japan.

I've also heard here that Manchester Business School at one point offered an MBA in Japan. I can't seem to find any recent info about this. If they still offer this program that's an option too I suppose.

Any advice???
quote
Duncan
I think there are big advantages to Keio: it is the country's top business school and certainly one of the top universities. Getting in there, and being able to study in Japanese, will be very good for your resume and your connections. The English-language programmes are great for networking with foreigners, but you sound as if you want better Japanese credibility.

As an alum, I think Manchester Business School never operated in Japan, as far as I know: certianly not since 1990 when I matriculated at Manchester.
I think there are big advantages to Keio: it is the country's top business school and certainly one of the top universities. Getting in there, and being able to study in Japanese, will be very good for your resume and your connections. The English-language programmes are great for networking with foreigners, but you sound as if you want better Japanese credibility.

As an alum, I think Manchester Business School never operated in Japan, as far as I know: certianly not since 1990 when I matriculated at Manchester.
quote
Thank you for the advice Duncan! I think this will be my strategy - to wait another year after intensive language classes and then apply when I am ready.

PS I actually found out about the Manchester program from one of your previous posts on the topic:

http://find-mba.com/board/asia/english-mba-in-japan-job-opportuinity-in-japan-and-europe-33477

But your link is now broken. I guess that it's old info.
Thank you for the advice Duncan! I think this will be my strategy - to wait another year after intensive language classes and then apply when I am ready.

PS I actually found out about the Manchester program from one of your previous posts on the topic:

http://find-mba.com/board/asia/english-mba-in-japan-job-opportuinity-in-japan-and-europe-33477

But your link is now broken. I guess that it's old info.
quote
Duncan
That's hilarious! I'd totally forgotten. MBS had a big internationalisation push under the old dean but now AMBS has a decolonisation approach, with dual degrees instead, initially in the US and China.

[Edited by Duncan on May 17, 2016]

That's hilarious! I'd totally forgotten. MBS had a big internationalisation push under the old dean but now AMBS has a decolonisation approach, with dual degrees instead, initially in the US and China.
quote
Duncan
I think it's a good idea to reach out now to Keio just in case they know now that they won't want you then. However, it's often a good idea to apply early to a school and get a conditional offer (conditional on a language score). They might even have favourable fees for students admitted to their courses to allow you to get more out of your language-learning investment.
I think it's a good idea to reach out now to Keio just in case they know now that they won't want you then. However, it's often a good idea to apply early to a school and get a conditional offer (conditional on a language score). They might even have favourable fees for students admitted to their courses to allow you to get more out of your language-learning investment.
quote
Razors Edg...
Agreed. My sense is that Keio doesn't recruit many non-Japanese students - but for them having you in the cohort would probably add some beneficial diversity.

The English-language programs will probably be a lot more diverse, with many students from other countries in Asia.
Agreed. My sense is that Keio doesn't recruit many non-Japanese students - but for them having you in the cohort would probably add some beneficial diversity.

The English-language programs will probably be a lot more diverse, with many students from other countries in Asia.
quote
I did Hitotsubashi in English 15-20% Western, 15%-20% Japanese, 15%-20% Chinese, 40-50% rest of Asia
I did Hitotsubashi in English 15-20% Western, 15%-20% Japanese, 15%-20% Chinese, 40-50% rest of Asia
quote
Flora_1
Did you finally decide on an MBA?
Did you finally decide on an MBA?
quote

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