HKUST placement prospect


I am just telling you the truth.

I can tell you that while Stanford has great name recognition in Asia, reality is that its alumni network is actually pretty weak in the region, especially if you're in the non-tech arena.

Believe what you want to believe. I am just offering an alternative view on things.

If you want to impress people at a cocktail party, Harvard and Stanford will do the trick no doubt. But, I don't think that's what life (or school) is about.


First off all, my hat is off to anyone after Stanford, whether or not you went there thats another story.

Your last paragraph again contradicts your supposed "Stanford" education. However if you truly believe what you said, you would never take INSEAD-Singapore over HK UST, never!




By coincidence I came across this website and also dropped my short opinion about INSEAD and business schools in another thread. My impression is that there are , strangely as it is, fanboys of various business schools here in these various threads. Anyone who attended a decent MBA program (Stanford is VERY decent, although currently at a lower rank in some bizarre ranking lists) will see MBA participants from other decent schools as good pals. Business schools often have a different focus: finance, general management, healthcare...
That's what makes them special for a certain part of interested applicants. I worked on a project at Stanford as junior student. The schools is brilliant. But my focus was more on general management and INSEAD had a better fit. To me! Others will find Stanford a better fit for them. Same with finance. I think Chicago and Columbia have an edge over other schools. However, your time at the MBA program is limited and you never have time to exploit all the different electives. There always are far more electives than you have time. Besides, folks don't know what elective means. At INSEAD e.g. you do "Advanced Corporate finance" and end up reading 800page-thick books and endless case studies all in 8 weeks. Until you get drowned in financial derivaties engineering. In other schools it would be broken down to several less demanding courses (I know that from Columbia).
Concerning alumni, my predecessor's post is right on focus. It depends on the diversity and region of your alumni. US schools have pretty poor alumni representation in Europe and vice versa. Same with Asia. Does it matter? No!!!
Because once you are in the club, you are in. I often attend MBA dinners across the world, often mixed from the top 15 Business schools. Career search of Harvard, Stanford, MIT and INSEAD are mutual services. You can use the Harvard's job list as a stanford or INSEAD student and vice versa.

It doesn't matter which MBA program you attended, if it is one of the top 10 or top 15 you are in the club. You don't have to impress anyone. The MBA rankings are a joke anyway, schools get shuffled up and down every few years, depending on biased criteria. Who cares?
I would rather give top business schools a ranking similar to the Michelin's guide: 5 star, 4 star, etc.
So if you are in a 5 star business school nobody cares which one you attend. With the Hongkong UST I am not sure, it certainly might be an excellent school, without doubt. But I am not sure whether it would even be listed in the Michelin's MBA Guide. Simply, because nobody ever heard that name. Which is the same problem of excellent first-class resaturants in the province, of the beaten Michelin treck...

<blockquote><blockquote>I am just telling you the truth.

I can tell you that while Stanford has great name recognition in Asia, reality is that its alumni network is actually pretty weak in the region, especially if you're in the non-tech arena.

Believe what you want to believe. I am just offering an alternative view on things.

If you want to impress people at a cocktail party, Harvard and Stanford will do the trick no doubt. But, I don't think that's what life (or school) is about. </blockquote>

First off all, my hat is off to anyone after Stanford, whether or not you went there thats another story.

Your last paragraph again contradicts your supposed "Stanford" education. However if you truly believe what you said, you would never take INSEAD-Singapore over HK UST, never!



</blockquote>

By coincidence I came across this website and also dropped my short opinion about INSEAD and business schools in another thread. My impression is that there are , strangely as it is, fanboys of various business schools here in these various threads. Anyone who attended a decent MBA program (Stanford is VERY decent, although currently at a lower rank in some bizarre ranking lists) will see MBA participants from other decent schools as good pals. Business schools often have a different focus: finance, general management, healthcare...
That's what makes them special for a certain part of interested applicants. I worked on a project at Stanford as junior student. The schools is brilliant. But my focus was more on general management and INSEAD had a better fit. To me! Others will find Stanford a better fit for them. Same with finance. I think Chicago and Columbia have an edge over other schools. However, your time at the MBA program is limited and you never have time to exploit all the different electives. There always are far more electives than you have time. Besides, folks don't know what elective means. At INSEAD e.g. you do "Advanced Corporate finance" and end up reading 800page-thick books and endless case studies all in 8 weeks. Until you get drowned in financial derivaties engineering. In other schools it would be broken down to several less demanding courses (I know that from Columbia).
Concerning alumni, my predecessor's post is right on focus. It depends on the diversity and region of your alumni. US schools have pretty poor alumni representation in Europe and vice versa. Same with Asia. Does it matter? No!!!
Because once you are in the club, you are in. I often attend MBA dinners across the world, often mixed from the top 15 Business schools. Career search of Harvard, Stanford, MIT and INSEAD are mutual services. You can use the Harvard's job list as a stanford or INSEAD student and vice versa.

It doesn't matter which MBA program you attended, if it is one of the top 10 or top 15 you are in the club. You don't have to impress anyone. The MBA rankings are a joke anyway, schools get shuffled up and down every few years, depending on biased criteria. Who cares?
I would rather give top business schools a ranking similar to the Michelin's guide: 5 star, 4 star, etc.
So if you are in a 5 star business school nobody cares which one you attend. With the Hongkong UST I am not sure, it certainly might be an excellent school, without doubt. But I am not sure whether it would even be listed in the Michelin's MBA Guide. Simply, because nobody ever heard that name. Which is the same problem of excellent first-class resaturants in the province, of the beaten Michelin treck...
quote
copernicus

Lets try to stick to the subject here, and that is placements after HK UST. No need to bring in other schools/continents in this thread.

HK UST placements and careers in Asia post graduation, please.

Lets try to stick to the subject here, and that is placements after HK UST. No need to bring in other schools/continents in this thread.

HK UST placements and careers in Asia post graduation, please.


quote
F1Sing

According to FT, Kellogg/Hong Kong UST is #1 in Top salaries category.

Link to rankings:
http://www.ft.com/cms/d02761a0-6041-11db-a716-0000779e2340.html

According to FT, Kellogg/Hong Kong UST is #1 in Top salaries category.

Link to rankings:
http://www.ft.com/cms/d02761a0-6041-11db-a716-0000779e2340.html
quote
Evan2007

Lets try to stick to the subject here, and that is placements after HK UST. No need to bring in other schools/continents in this thread.


Look who's talking.

<blockquote>Lets try to stick to the subject here, and that is placements after HK UST. No need to bring in other schools/continents in this thread.</blockquote>

Look who's talking.
quote
mBa2008

Hello All!

Hong Kong UST is on my short list of schools in Asia.
It should come of no surprise that my primary reason for pursuing an MBA is to work on HK's "Wall Street" I have quant background from top Polish University and would like to work in Asian Derivatives.

Hong Kong UST does seem to have good names present on campus.

ABN AMRO

ACNielsen

Advanced Digital Broadcast

AIA Hong Kong

Airport City Logistics Co., Ltd.

Amerinvest Group

Argyle Street Management Ltd

Arthur D. Little

Asia Cardiovascular Products Ltd

Asia Society Hong Kong Centre

Asian Development Bank

AT Kearny

AXA

Bank of China (HK) Ltd

Bank of China Int'l (BOCI)

Bank of Nova Scotia

Barclays Capital

Barclays Global Investors

BASF

BearingPoint

Bekaert

BNP Paribas

Booz Allen Hamilton

British Petroleum (BP)

BT Global Services

Calyon Corporate and Investment Bank

Capital Eight

China International Capital Corporation Ltd

China Merchants Group

CIBC World Markets

Cisco Systems (HK) Ltd

CITIC Securities

Citigroup

Clariant (China) Ltd.

CLP Holdings Ltd

Credit Suisse HOLT

Cushman & Wakefield Capital Asia Ltd

DBS

Deutsche Bank

eBay Int'l (HK) Ltd

Education First

Emerson Network

Ethos Technologies

Fidelity International

Fimat

Fresenius Medical Care

Fusion Consulting

GE China

GE Money

Getz HK

Givenchy Asia Pacific (LVMH Group)

Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT)

Global Payments Inc

Global Sources

Glu Mobile

Goldman Sachs

Good Earth Electric Vehicle Co Ltd

Google China

Grail Research (Member of Monitor Group)

Hay Group

HK Disneyland

HKUST R & D Corporation (Guangzhou) Ltd

Hopewell Holdings Ltd

HSBC Group

HSBC Investment

Hutchison Port Holdings

IBM Global Business Services

ICS Trust

IDS Group

ING

Intel

International Finance Corporation - IFC

ISR Hong Kong (Consulting)

JAFCO Asia

Jebsen

Johnson & Johnson

Johnson Controls Inc.

Johnson Electric

Jovian Financial Communications Ltd

JP Morgan

KPMG

Lafarge Shui-On Cement

Lehman Brothers

LVMH Group

Macquarie

Maxims Group

McCann Worldgroup

McKinsey BTO

Mercer HR Consulting

Merrill Lynch (Asia Pacific) Ltd

Methanex Asia Pacific Ltd

Microsoft HK Ltd

Miramar Group

Monitor Group

Morgan Stanley

MRM Worldwide (McCann Worldgroup)

Calyon Corporate and Investment Bank

Capital Eight

China International Capital Corporation Ltd

China Merchants Group

CIBC World Markets

Cisco Systems (HK) Ltd

CITIC Securities

Citigroup

Clariant (China) Ltd.

CLP Holdings Ltd

Credit Suisse HOLT

Cushman & Wakefield Capital Asia Ltd

DBS

Deutsche Bank

eBay Int'l (HK) Ltd

Education First

Emerson Network

Ethos Technologies

Fidelity International

Fimat

Fresenius Medical Care

Fusion Consulting

GE China

GE Money

Getz HK

Givenchy Asia Pacific (LVMH Group)

Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT)

Global Payments Inc

Global Sources

Glu Mobile

Goldman Sachs

Good Earth Electric Vehicle Co Ltd

Google China

Grail Research (Member of Monitor Group)

Hay Group

HK Disneyland

HKUST R & D Corporation (Guangzhou) Ltd

Hopewell Holdings Ltd

HSBC Group

HSBC Investment

Hutchison Port Holdings

IBM Global Business Services

ICS Trust

IDS Group

ING

Intel

International Finance Corporation - IFC

ISR Hong Kong (Consulting)

JAFCO Asia

Jebsen

Johnson & Johnson

Johnson Controls Inc.

Johnson Electric

Jovian Financial Communications Ltd

JP Morgan

KPMG

Lafarge Shui-On Cement

Lehman Brothers

LVMH Group

Macquarie

Maxims Group

McCann Worldgroup

McKinsey BTO

Mercer HR Consulting

Merrill Lynch (Asia Pacific) Ltd

Methanex Asia Pacific Ltd

Microsoft HK Ltd

Miramar Group

Monitor Group

Morgan Stanley

MRM Worldwide (McCann Worldgroup)

Nano-Tex Inc

Newsmith Capital Partners

Noble Group

Nortel

PA Consulting

PCCW

PepsiCo

Philips

Prudential Corporation Asia

Quellos Group LLC

RedPill, Singapore

Ripley

Royal Bank of Scotland

SAC Capital

Signal Media and Communications Holdings Limited

Societe Generale

Spectrum Strategy

Standard Chartered

Star Group Ltd

State Street Asset Management

State Street Global Advisors

SWIFT

Techtronic Industries

The Nielsen Company - BASES

The Stock Exchange of HK Ltd (HKEx)

The United Nations University Office

Towers Perrin

TPG

UBS

Underwriter Laboratories Int'l Ltd

Uniplan

VW, Germany

W.L.Gore & Associates

Watson Wyatt

Woodward Consulting

Does any one have access to information on internships and how they later translated into full time employment? Also is there a time limit of how long European can work in HK after graduation?

Hello All!

Hong Kong UST is on my short list of schools in Asia.
It should come of no surprise that my primary reason for pursuing an MBA is to work on HK's "Wall Street" I have quant background from top Polish University and would like to work in Asian Derivatives.

Hong Kong UST does seem to have good names present on campus.

ABN AMRO

ACNielsen

Advanced Digital Broadcast

AIA Hong Kong

Airport City Logistics Co., Ltd.

Amerinvest Group

Argyle Street Management Ltd

Arthur D. Little

Asia Cardiovascular Products Ltd

Asia Society Hong Kong Centre

Asian Development Bank

AT Kearny

AXA

Bank of China (HK) Ltd

Bank of China Int'l (BOCI)

Bank of Nova Scotia

Barclays Capital

Barclays Global Investors

BASF

BearingPoint

Bekaert

BNP Paribas

Booz Allen Hamilton

British Petroleum (BP)

BT Global Services

Calyon Corporate and Investment Bank

Capital Eight

China International Capital Corporation Ltd

China Merchants Group

CIBC World Markets

Cisco Systems (HK) Ltd

CITIC Securities

Citigroup

Clariant (China) Ltd.

CLP Holdings Ltd

Credit Suisse HOLT

Cushman & Wakefield Capital Asia Ltd

DBS

Deutsche Bank

eBay Int'l (HK) Ltd

Education First

Emerson Network

Ethos Technologies

Fidelity International

Fimat

Fresenius Medical Care

Fusion Consulting

GE China

GE Money

Getz HK

Givenchy Asia Pacific (LVMH Group)

Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT)

Global Payments Inc

Global Sources

Glu Mobile

Goldman Sachs

Good Earth Electric Vehicle Co Ltd

Google China

Grail Research (Member of Monitor Group)

Hay Group

HK Disneyland

HKUST R & D Corporation (Guangzhou) Ltd

Hopewell Holdings Ltd

HSBC Group

HSBC Investment

Hutchison Port Holdings

IBM Global Business Services

ICS Trust

IDS Group

ING

Intel

International Finance Corporation - IFC

ISR Hong Kong (Consulting)

JAFCO Asia

Jebsen

Johnson & Johnson

Johnson Controls Inc.

Johnson Electric

Jovian Financial Communications Ltd

JP Morgan

KPMG

Lafarge Shui-On Cement

Lehman Brothers

LVMH Group

Macquarie

Maxims Group

McCann Worldgroup

McKinsey BTO

Mercer HR Consulting

Merrill Lynch (Asia Pacific) Ltd

Methanex Asia Pacific Ltd

Microsoft HK Ltd

Miramar Group

Monitor Group

Morgan Stanley

MRM Worldwide (McCann Worldgroup)

Calyon Corporate and Investment Bank

Capital Eight

China International Capital Corporation Ltd

China Merchants Group

CIBC World Markets

Cisco Systems (HK) Ltd

CITIC Securities

Citigroup

Clariant (China) Ltd.

CLP Holdings Ltd

Credit Suisse HOLT

Cushman & Wakefield Capital Asia Ltd

DBS

Deutsche Bank

eBay Int'l (HK) Ltd

Education First

Emerson Network

Ethos Technologies

Fidelity International

Fimat

Fresenius Medical Care

Fusion Consulting

GE China

GE Money

Getz HK

Givenchy Asia Pacific (LVMH Group)

Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT)

Global Payments Inc

Global Sources

Glu Mobile

Goldman Sachs

Good Earth Electric Vehicle Co Ltd

Google China

Grail Research (Member of Monitor Group)

Hay Group

HK Disneyland

HKUST R & D Corporation (Guangzhou) Ltd

Hopewell Holdings Ltd

HSBC Group

HSBC Investment

Hutchison Port Holdings

IBM Global Business Services

ICS Trust

IDS Group

ING

Intel

International Finance Corporation - IFC

ISR Hong Kong (Consulting)

JAFCO Asia

Jebsen

Johnson & Johnson

Johnson Controls Inc.

Johnson Electric

Jovian Financial Communications Ltd

JP Morgan

KPMG

Lafarge Shui-On Cement

Lehman Brothers

LVMH Group

Macquarie

Maxims Group

McCann Worldgroup

McKinsey BTO

Mercer HR Consulting

Merrill Lynch (Asia Pacific) Ltd

Methanex Asia Pacific Ltd

Microsoft HK Ltd

Miramar Group

Monitor Group

Morgan Stanley

MRM Worldwide (McCann Worldgroup)

Nano-Tex Inc

Newsmith Capital Partners

Noble Group

Nortel

PA Consulting

PCCW

PepsiCo

Philips

Prudential Corporation Asia

Quellos Group LLC

RedPill, Singapore

Ripley

Royal Bank of Scotland

SAC Capital

Signal Media and Communications Holdings Limited

Societe Generale

Spectrum Strategy

Standard Chartered

Star Group Ltd

State Street Asset Management

State Street Global Advisors

SWIFT

Techtronic Industries

The Nielsen Company - BASES

The Stock Exchange of HK Ltd (HKEx)

The United Nations University Office

Towers Perrin

TPG

UBS

Underwriter Laboratories Int'l Ltd

Uniplan

VW, Germany

W.L.Gore & Associates

Watson Wyatt

Woodward Consulting

Does any one have access to information on internships and how they later translated into full time employment? Also is there a time limit of how long European can work in HK after graduation?



quote
copernicus

missing from the list, amongst other prominent names, is Ward Ferry Management, the largest local hedge fund in Asia, ex Japan. They have recruited in the past along with high profile VC names - TPG Asia, etc. So I am not sure where you copied it from.

You should have no problem getting offers from everyone from Macquarie to Goldman in Equity Derivatives/Structuring, if in fact you have the quant background necessary for these roles. If not HK UST does have offerings which can prepare you for such opportunities, I would strongly suggest spending time with prof. Salih Neftci and taking his quant courses. You could buy and read his books to start with, this guy is a pretty well known.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/104-9090378-6419933?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Salih%20N.%20Neftci

Advanced Derivatives Analysis
Advanced techniques in option pricing and derivatives risk management. Topics include the binomial model, risk-neutral valuation, extension of the Black-Scholes pricing model and option Greeks. The course will also include discussion and analysis of options on futures, interest rate options such as caps and floors, and some popular OTC products such as equity-linked notes and principal guaranteed funds.

Computing and Programming in Finance
An introduction to Visual Basic with applications to financial modelling. Includes implementation of the Black-Scholes formula, Greeks parameters, binomial tress and Monte Carlo methods using VBA. Introduction to programming languages C++.

Equity Valuation
Basic valuation approaches including dividend discount model, free cash flows model, and valuation by multiples; measures of company performance and value added; valuation in special situations such as emerging markets, closely held companies, mergers, and divestitures.

Equity Investment Management
The course covers the complete investment process from constructing investment objectives and policies to broad class asset allocation, monitoring, and performance measurement and attribution. Practical issues relating to investment style, active and passive management, stock market inefficiency will be discussed. Advanced techniques in portfolio construction involving the use of the Black-Litteman model, single index and multi-factor are studied.

Advanced Derivatives Applications
Practical applications of derivative pricing and hedging, focusing on equity-linked structures. The emphasis of the course will be on building intuition with regard to option pricing and hedging, using Excel-based pricing models and real world applications. A solid foundation in option pricing theory as provided by the prerequisite courses is assumed, as is familiarity with Excel and VBA.

Asset Securitization
An in-depth analysis of structured securities. Reviews the essential methods used by rating agencies in appraising the credit of asset backed securities and mortgage back securities. Hands-on exercise leading to the assignment of credit ratings.

Behavioral Finance
An application of psychological theories to explain the inefficiencies in financial markets. Examine how psychological biases such as representativeness heuristic, overconfidence, availability biases, framing, cognitive biases, and emotions influence investors and their investment decision-making process.

Credit Risk Management
Various kinds of credit risks, credit risk estimation, capital adequacy, credit risk models, stress testing, and credit derivatives.

Fixed Income Derivatives
This course teaches fixed-income derivatives and related topics. The course begins with varieties of floating-rate instruments. It then moves on to topics in applications of interest-rate futures in managing interest rate risk. The bulk of the course is devoted to all kinds of non-standard interest-rate swaps, including currency swaps. Finally, it touches upon topics in interest-rate options such as caps, floors, swaptions, and in bonds with embedded interest-rate options. Both economic intuition and quantitative skills are emphasized.

Risk Management for Financial Institutions
Management issues for financial institutions, with an emphasis on commercial banks. Capital adequacy, liquidity and interest rate risk management; market structure; regulatory issues of financial intermediaries.

Structured Products and Exotic Options
Development of structured products, such as option-embedded bonds, equity-linked notes, dual currency options, exotic options and equity-linked Forex options. Risk and return analysis of structured products, with applications in portfolio management.

If you can get through these courses, I am sure structuring deals/notes, etc should not be a problem. There are also others, you can find descriptions here.

http://mfin.bm.ust.hk/programmes/programmes4.html

As far as I know there is no time limit for anyone, once the employer sponsors you its up to you how long you stay.

Also have you considered the M.S. Global Finance program NYU/HK UST? If not, I am sure you could participate in the English speaking sessions as a "guest"

http://globalfinance.bm.ust.hk/index.asp

Program Schedule and Content
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Module Topic Period By

Module 1 Foundation 1: Asset Markets 30 Nov - 3 Dec 2007 (Fri - Mon) Professor Jie Gan (UST)
Professor Chu Zhang (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 2 Foundation 2: Corporate Finance 25 - 28 Jan 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Suditpo Dasgupta (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 3 Portfolio Management and Asset Allocation 15-18 Feb 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Bruno Solnik (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 4 Derivatives Markets 16 - 19 Mar 2008 (Sun - Wed) Professor Menachem Brenner (NYU)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 5 Applied Corporate Finance and Valuation 18 - 21 Apr 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Vidhan Goyal (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 6 Foreign Exchange Markets 16 - 19 May 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Richard Levich (NYU)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 7 Financial Engineering 30 May - 2 Jun 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Salih Neftci (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 8 Fixed Income Instruments and Markets 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Edwin J. Elton (NYU)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 9 Risk Management 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Anthony Saunders (NYU)
Professor Edward I. Altman (NYU)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 10 Topics in Financial Markets and Innovation 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Marti Subrahmanyam (NYU) and others (NYU)




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Mumbai:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
1030, 21 April 2007
Hilton Towers

Shenzhen:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
1400, 23 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Tokyo:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English with Japanese interpretation)
1800, 23 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Shanghai:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
0930, 24 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Seoul:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
1700, 24 April 2007
Lotte Hotel

Beijing:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
0930, 25 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Taipei:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the Asia market
(In Mandarin)
1430, 26 April 2007
Grand Hyatt Taipei

Singapore:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
1130, 26 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Hong Kong:
Exploiting Arbitrage Relations in Foreign Exchange, Interest Rate and Derivatives Markets
(In English)
1200, 09 May 2007
HKUST Centre

missing from the list, amongst other prominent names, is Ward Ferry Management, the largest local hedge fund in Asia, ex Japan. They have recruited in the past along with high profile VC names - TPG Asia, etc. So I am not sure where you copied it from.

You should have no problem getting offers from everyone from Macquarie to Goldman in Equity Derivatives/Structuring, if in fact you have the quant background necessary for these roles. If not HK UST does have offerings which can prepare you for such opportunities, I would strongly suggest spending time with prof. Salih Neftci and taking his quant courses. You could buy and read his books to start with, this guy is a pretty well known.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/104-9090378-6419933?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Salih%20N.%20Neftci

Advanced Derivatives Analysis
Advanced techniques in option pricing and derivatives risk management. Topics include the binomial model, risk-neutral valuation, extension of the Black-Scholes pricing model and option Greeks. The course will also include discussion and analysis of options on futures, interest rate options such as caps and floors, and some popular OTC products such as equity-linked notes and principal guaranteed funds.

Computing and Programming in Finance
An introduction to Visual Basic with applications to financial modelling. Includes implementation of the Black-Scholes formula, Greeks parameters, binomial tress and Monte Carlo methods using VBA. Introduction to programming languages C++.

Equity Valuation
Basic valuation approaches including dividend discount model, free cash flows model, and valuation by multiples; measures of company performance and value added; valuation in special situations such as emerging markets, closely held companies, mergers, and divestitures.

Equity Investment Management
The course covers the complete investment process from constructing investment objectives and policies to broad class asset allocation, monitoring, and performance measurement and attribution. Practical issues relating to investment style, active and passive management, stock market inefficiency will be discussed. Advanced techniques in portfolio construction involving the use of the Black-Litteman model, single index and multi-factor are studied.

Advanced Derivatives Applications
Practical applications of derivative pricing and hedging, focusing on equity-linked structures. The emphasis of the course will be on building intuition with regard to option pricing and hedging, using Excel-based pricing models and real world applications. A solid foundation in option pricing theory as provided by the prerequisite courses is assumed, as is familiarity with Excel and VBA.

Asset Securitization
An in-depth analysis of structured securities. Reviews the essential methods used by rating agencies in appraising the credit of asset backed securities and mortgage back securities. Hands-on exercise leading to the assignment of credit ratings.

Behavioral Finance
An application of psychological theories to explain the inefficiencies in financial markets. Examine how psychological biases such as representativeness heuristic, overconfidence, availability biases, framing, cognitive biases, and emotions influence investors and their investment decision-making process.

Credit Risk Management
Various kinds of credit risks, credit risk estimation, capital adequacy, credit risk models, stress testing, and credit derivatives.

Fixed Income Derivatives
This course teaches fixed-income derivatives and related topics. The course begins with varieties of floating-rate instruments. It then moves on to topics in applications of interest-rate futures in managing interest rate risk. The bulk of the course is devoted to all kinds of non-standard interest-rate swaps, including currency swaps. Finally, it touches upon topics in interest-rate options such as caps, floors, swaptions, and in bonds with embedded interest-rate options. Both economic intuition and quantitative skills are emphasized.

Risk Management for Financial Institutions
Management issues for financial institutions, with an emphasis on commercial banks. Capital adequacy, liquidity and interest rate risk management; market structure; regulatory issues of financial intermediaries.

Structured Products and Exotic Options
Development of structured products, such as option-embedded bonds, equity-linked notes, dual currency options, exotic options and equity-linked Forex options. Risk and return analysis of structured products, with applications in portfolio management.

If you can get through these courses, I am sure structuring deals/notes, etc should not be a problem. There are also others, you can find descriptions here.

http://mfin.bm.ust.hk/programmes/programmes4.html

As far as I know there is no time limit for anyone, once the employer sponsors you its up to you how long you stay.

Also have you considered the M.S. Global Finance program NYU/HK UST? If not, I am sure you could participate in the English speaking sessions as a "guest"

http://globalfinance.bm.ust.hk/index.asp

Program Schedule and Content
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Module Topic Period By

Module 1 Foundation 1: Asset Markets 30 Nov - 3 Dec 2007 (Fri - Mon) Professor Jie Gan (UST)
Professor Chu Zhang (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 2 Foundation 2: Corporate Finance 25 - 28 Jan 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Suditpo Dasgupta (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 3 Portfolio Management and Asset Allocation 15-18 Feb 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Bruno Solnik (UST)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 4 Derivatives Markets 16 - 19 Mar 2008 (Sun - Wed) Professor Menachem Brenner (NYU)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Module 5 Applied Corporate Finance and Valuation 18 - 21 Apr 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Vidhan Goyal (UST)

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Module 6 Foreign Exchange Markets 16 - 19 May 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Richard Levich (NYU)

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Module 7 Financial Engineering 30 May - 2 Jun 2008 (Fri - Mon) Professor Salih Neftci (UST)

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Module 8 Fixed Income Instruments and Markets 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Edwin J. Elton (NYU)

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Module 9 Risk Management 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Anthony Saunders (NYU)
Professor Edward I. Altman (NYU)

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Module 10 Topics in Financial Markets and Innovation 28 Jul - 9 Aug 2008 (Mon - Sat) Professor Marti Subrahmanyam (NYU) and others (NYU)




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Mumbai:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
10:30-12:30, 21 April 2007
Hilton Towers

Shenzhen:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
14:00-16:00, 23 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Tokyo:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English with Japanese interpretation)
18:00-20:00, 23 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Shanghai:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
09:30-11:30, 24 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Seoul:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
17:00-19:00, 24 April 2007
Lotte Hotel

Beijing:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the China market
(In Mandarin)
09:30-11:30, 25 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Taipei:
Development and opportunities of structured products and exotic options for the Asia market
(In Mandarin)
14:30-16:30, 26 April 2007
Grand Hyatt Taipei

Singapore:
Structured Products & Exotic Options in Asia, Implications for Banks and Regulators
(In English)
11:30-13:30, 26 April 2007
Reuters Centre

Hong Kong:
Exploiting Arbitrage Relations in Foreign Exchange, Interest Rate and Derivatives Markets
(In English)
12:00-14:00, 09 May 2007
HKUST Centre


quote
copernicus

The 2007 placement report is out. Salaries in HK and China went up nicely. Employed overseas figures continue to be affected by students taking jobs elsewhere in Asia at lower compensation levels than in US/EU. Perhaps the biggest positive is the remarkable trend of salary increases from pre to post MBA levels. Over 200% increase in post graduation salary 44% of class of 2007 graduates, and 100-200% increase in post graduation 26% of class of 2007 graduates
Also new employers such as one of the top hedge funds in the world, SAC Capital run by legendary trader Steve Cohen, have come in to recruit on campus. Top European and US investment banking firms still there, as well as hedge funds an venture capital firms.

http://www.mbacareer.ust.hk/students/employment_highlights2007.htm

The 2007 placement report is out. Salaries in HK and China went up nicely. Employed overseas figures continue to be affected by students taking jobs elsewhere in Asia at lower compensation levels than in US/EU. Perhaps the biggest positive is the remarkable trend of salary increases from pre to post MBA levels. Over 200% increase in post graduation salary 44% of class of 2007 graduates, and 100-200% increase in post graduation 26% of class of 2007 graduates
Also new employers such as one of the top hedge funds in the world, SAC Capital run by legendary trader Steve Cohen, have come in to recruit on campus. Top European and US investment banking firms still there, as well as hedge funds an venture capital firms.

http://www.mbacareer.ust.hk/students/employment_highlights2007.htm

quote
kit

copernicus,

thanks for the information. that's good to know. but what is ur connection to this school? do you go there? did you graduate from there? what are ur credents? if you actually work there, why not just say so? i don't get it ... i agree hong kong ust has benefits and potential, but your support and fandom is, well, suspicious.

copernicus,

thanks for the information. that's good to know. but what is ur connection to this school? do you go there? did you graduate from there? what are ur credents? if you actually work there, why not just say so? i don't get it ... i agree hong kong ust has benefits and potential, but your support and fandom is, well, suspicious.
quote
copernicus

copernicus,

thanks for the information. that's good to know. but what is ur connection to this school? do you go there? did you graduate from there? what are ur credents? if you actually work there, why not just say so? i don't get it ... i agree hong kong ust has benefits and potential, but your support and fandom is, well, suspicious.


incoming mba class '09 student.

Just sharing what I know, with everyone, i wish i could have access to all this info when i was first starting to look at Asian MBAs.

<blockquote>copernicus,

thanks for the information. that's good to know. but what is ur connection to this school? do you go there? did you graduate from there? what are ur credents? if you actually work there, why not just say so? i don't get it ... i agree hong kong ust has benefits and potential, but your support and fandom is, well, suspicious.</blockquote>

incoming mba class '09 student.

Just sharing what I know, with everyone, i wish i could have access to all this info when i was first starting to look at Asian MBAs.
quote
kit

hey, you're right, everyone benefits from more information. and congrats on the admission!

hey, you're right, everyone benefits from more information. and congrats on the admission!
quote
valentino

these are certainly good companies to work for... but
is it possible for someone speaking only English to land these finance/venture capital/Ibank positions in HK??

these are certainly good companies to work for... but
is it possible for someone speaking only English to land these finance/venture capital/Ibank positions in HK??
quote
copernicus

these are certainly good companies to work for... but
is it possible for someone speaking only English to land these finance/venture capital/Ibank positions in HK??


finance and IB in HK definitely yes, venture capital little more difficult as they really want you to speak Cantonese/Mandarin to speak to businesses and their managers....but if you have some specific sector experience which they are looking for, you should be able to make it.

<blockquote>these are certainly good companies to work for... but
is it possible for someone speaking only English to land these finance/venture capital/Ibank positions in HK??
</blockquote>

finance and IB in HK definitely yes, venture capital little more difficult as they really want you to speak Cantonese/Mandarin to speak to businesses and their managers....but if you have some specific sector experience which they are looking for, you should be able to make it.
quote
shawn.hk

anybody on these boards with HKUST degree and working overseas?

anybody on these boards with HKUST degree and working overseas?

quote
saneel

Hey guys,
Relatively new to this forum, I am planning to od an MBA from Asia Pacific.
Gave my GMAT got a score of 630 (less than expected)
But as the deadlines are near and i dont want to wait for one more year!! Can anyone tell me about my chances about getting into HKUST or HKU??
My profile is as follows:
BE in Electronics and Telecomm from Mumbai (Bombay) India
will complete 4 years of work exp in a reputed multinational by july 08 and GMAT score is 630 as mentioned above.
If not HKU and HKUST which schools do you think in Asia are my chances of gettin in bright??
Expecting a reply soon
Thanks

Hey guys,
Relatively new to this forum, I am planning to od an MBA from Asia Pacific.
Gave my GMAT got a score of 630 (less than expected)
But as the deadlines are near and i dont want to wait for one more year!! Can anyone tell me about my chances about getting into HKUST or HKU??
My profile is as follows:
BE in Electronics and Telecomm from Mumbai (Bombay) India
will complete 4 years of work exp in a reputed multinational by july 08 and GMAT score is 630 as mentioned above.
If not HKU and HKUST which schools do you think in Asia are my chances of gettin in bright??
Expecting a reply soon
Thanks
quote
jona

You might want to read the following post, you will find a lot of info about HKUST and other hong kong business schools:

http://www.find-mba.com/board/3474/ (posts by vasilijs)

You might want to read the following post, you will find a lot of info about HKUST and other hong kong business schools:

http://www.find-mba.com/board/3474/ (posts by vasilijs)
quote
saneel

Thanks for the link it was indeed helpful!! The feeling what i got from a few blogs which i have got is that - One has to be proficient in mandarin that too professional grade to get a job in Hong Kong!! I dont know how easy or difficult is tht, but My education rite frm primary level has been in English!
Could you comment on this also any idea abt the scholarhips or waivers??

Thanks for the link it was indeed helpful!! The feeling what i got from a few blogs which i have got is that - One has to be proficient in mandarin that too professional grade to get a job in Hong Kong!! I dont know how easy or difficult is tht, but My education rite frm primary level has been in English!
Could you comment on this also any idea abt the scholarhips or waivers??
quote
shawn.hk

Thanks for the link it was indeed helpful!! The feeling what i got from a few blogs which i have got is that - One has to be proficient in mandarin that too professional grade to get a job in Hong Kong!! I dont know how easy or difficult is tht, but My education rite frm primary level has been in English!
Could you comment on this also any idea abt the scholarhips or waivers??


Mandarin helps of course, but anyone with good "soft/people/interpersonal" skills has a very good job prospects here in HK. The job market is absolutely booming over here, lately it has been the hedge funds which are opening satellite offices and recruiting. private banking is red hot, investment banking also - although for strict IB and research Mandarin is usually a pre-requisite, sales/trading, etc you can do without it.

<blockquote>Thanks for the link it was indeed helpful!! The feeling what i got from a few blogs which i have got is that - One has to be proficient in mandarin that too professional grade to get a job in Hong Kong!! I dont know how easy or difficult is tht, but My education rite frm primary level has been in English!
Could you comment on this also any idea abt the scholarhips or waivers??</blockquote>

Mandarin helps of course, but anyone with good "soft/people/interpersonal" skills has a very good job prospects here in HK. The job market is absolutely booming over here, lately it has been the hedge funds which are opening satellite offices and recruiting. private banking is red hot, investment banking also - although for strict IB and research Mandarin is usually a pre-requisite, sales/trading, etc you can do without it.

quote
mara

Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?

Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?
quote
vasilijs

Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?


YES. Approximately 50% of HKUST MBA class do not speak Cantonese or Mandarin (this is approximately the figure for my class now, and this was approximately the figure for the last year class), and still find a job in Hong Kong - a decent job in Hong Kong, including IB and Consulting. According the the previous year class experience, only about 30% of jobs offered to MBA level applicants require proficiency in Chinese. The remaining 70% do not.

<blockquote>Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?</blockquote>

YES. Approximately 50% of HKUST MBA class do not speak Cantonese or Mandarin (this is approximately the figure for my class now, and this was approximately the figure for the last year class), and still find a job in Hong Kong - a decent job in Hong Kong, including IB and Consulting. According the the previous year class experience, only about 30% of jobs offered to MBA level applicants require proficiency in Chinese. The remaining 70% do not.
quote
shawn.hk

Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?


provided you have good interpersonal skills, yes - you absolutely can get a good job in HK with English only.

<blockquote>Are you saying that one can find a decent job in Hong Kong with English language skills only, without any knowledge of Mandarin?</blockquote>

provided you have good interpersonal skills, yes - you absolutely can get a good job in HK with English only.
quote

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