Tippie to end its Full Time MBA


mba hipste...
Tippie will end its Full Time MBA program:

https://tippie.uiowa.edu/news/tippie-sets-new-direction-growth-its-mba-and-graduate-programs

They say it's because students are asking for programs that do not disrupt their schedules and are looking to study specific subjects rather than vernal MBAs.

Tippie's Full Time MBA is ranked #84 in the FT.
Tippie will end its Full Time MBA program:

https://tippie.uiowa.edu/news/tippie-sets-new-direction-growth-its-mba-and-graduate-programs

They say it's because students are asking for programs that do not disrupt their schedules and are looking to study specific subjects rather than vernal MBAs.

Tippie's Full Time MBA is ranked #84 in the FT.
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Duncan
Amazing. I guess it is the same issue for the Midwest law schools that are shrinking because of the lack of employer demand.
Amazing. I guess it is the same issue for the Midwest law schools that are shrinking because of the lack of employer demand.
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laurie
Going down the path of Wake Forest...
Going down the path of Wake Forest...
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Duncan
And Virginia Tech.
And Virginia Tech.
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Ayon
A lot depends on the class composition, and if it makes business sense for Universities to run such programs. Generally speaking, MBA programs ranked US 20 - 70 or so have students in the range of 80-200 far less than hundreds admitted in the likes of H/W etc.
The class composition tends to be 40% internationals with 60% domestic. Internationals constantly provide schools with higher GMAT scores, more money (in tuition) and diversity. GMAT Score and diversity recorded in various rankings.

Internationals either find a job here in States or go back. The conversion rate is dependent on various macroeconomic indicators. The international alumni often doesn't progress at the same rate as domestic. Domestic alumni almost always prefer to be in touch with domestic students - and help them out over internationals. Of course, domestic alumni can only help so much. Much of H1B hiring policies et el is governed by recruiters/hiring manager/government.

Domestic students don't always see the value in investing $xx,xxx into tuition fees and start with $yy,yyy per year. They don't want to leave their current jobs, hence executive, part-time MBA programs have become popular for domestic students in US top 20-80. To still lure domestic students into their full time MBA program, the university often dole out good financial packages even to below average GMAT score holders - an unheard of phenomena for international students.

In the end it boils down to career services, and how helpful (or not) they are. Domestic students know the value of a said university in that region. They usually make informed decisions. Internationals also get wary about university that has more than 40% international students. It's like paying in US$ for an experience that they might get for cheaper (by virtue of paying in their local currency).

Ultimately if a full time MBA program doesn't generate enough profits for the university - it's shut down. WF, VTech, Tippie are just the beginning. There is huge disjoint between what a Tier 2 or 3 MBA can deliver vs What companies really want.
P.S - That's why 1 year specialized MS degrees are in rave now in US. Those classes are almost 80% + international.
Just my 2 cents.
A lot depends on the class composition, and if it makes business sense for Universities to run such programs. Generally speaking, MBA programs ranked US 20 - 70 or so have students in the range of 80-200 far less than hundreds admitted in the likes of H/W etc.
The class composition tends to be 40% internationals with 60% domestic. Internationals constantly provide schools with higher GMAT scores, more money (in tuition) and diversity. GMAT Score and diversity recorded in various rankings.

Internationals either find a job here in States or go back. The conversion rate is dependent on various macroeconomic indicators. The international alumni often doesn't progress at the same rate as domestic. Domestic alumni almost always prefer to be in touch with domestic students - and help them out over internationals. Of course, domestic alumni can only help so much. Much of H1B hiring policies et el is governed by recruiters/hiring manager/government.

Domestic students don't always see the value in investing $xx,xxx into tuition fees and start with $yy,yyy per year. They don't want to leave their current jobs, hence executive, part-time MBA programs have become popular for domestic students in US top 20-80. To still lure domestic students into their full time MBA program, the university often dole out good financial packages even to below average GMAT score holders - an unheard of phenomena for international students.

In the end it boils down to career services, and how helpful (or not) they are. Domestic students know the value of a said university in that region. They usually make informed decisions. Internationals also get wary about university that has more than 40% international students. It's like paying in US$ for an experience that they might get for cheaper (by virtue of paying in their local currency).

Ultimately if a full time MBA program doesn't generate enough profits for the university - it's shut down. WF, VTech, Tippie are just the beginning. There is huge disjoint between what a Tier 2 or 3 MBA can deliver vs What companies really want.
P.S - That's why 1 year specialized MS degrees are in rave now in US. Those classes are almost 80% + international.
Just my 2 cents.
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Duncan
So the next schools to close their full-time MBAs? The ones with poor placement (GWU, USC Moore)? The guess the ones with low salaries (UTD, Temple) are well placed to run MS programs.
So the next schools to close their full-time MBAs? The ones with poor placement (GWU, USC Moore)? The guess the ones with low salaries (UTD, Temple) are well placed to run MS programs.
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Ayon
UTD and Temple are well placed to run 1 year MS programs. UTD more so than Fox. Temple had a late entry into the 1 year MS frenzy. Their location, class composition, and price point isn't appealing for full time MBA international students anyways.

USC Moore in my opinion will surely move from it's international MBA towards professional MBA. International students looking for upwards mobility looked upto flashy US degrees with starry eyes, but that was several years back. They would pounce on easy admission paths of International MBA tracks such as Thunderbird, while Moore was a distant second. Indian & Chinese have become more careful with their money in terms of the value add that an MBA branding itself as "International" provides.
Moore might still be attractive to student from South America - that will fade in years to come.

GWU is another story, when I visited GWU I saw students with deep deep pockets (with their super rich appearing parents). I don't think many of them care about placements. They would have strong network connections already in place. To put it mildly GWU is the most known branded school in DC (Not everyone can get into Georgetown, or want to travel to UMD/UVA - if they can get an admit).

I won't be surprised to see some big names like Simon - University of Rochester, Eller - Arizona, GTech etc close their MBA programs in next 7-10 years and move towards their core strength if the sentiments of recruiting companies and the government towards students doesn't change.

[Edited by Ayon on Sep 08, 2017]

UTD and Temple are well placed to run 1 year MS programs. UTD more so than Fox. Temple had a late entry into the 1 year MS frenzy. Their location, class composition, and price point isn't appealing for full time MBA international students anyways.

USC Moore in my opinion will surely move from it's international MBA towards professional MBA. International students looking for upwards mobility looked upto flashy US degrees with starry eyes, but that was several years back. They would pounce on easy admission paths of International MBA tracks such as Thunderbird, while Moore was a distant second. Indian & Chinese have become more careful with their money in terms of the value add that an MBA branding itself as "International" provides.
Moore might still be attractive to student from South America - that will fade in years to come.

GWU is another story, when I visited GWU I saw students with deep deep pockets (with their super rich appearing parents). I don't think many of them care about placements. They would have strong network connections already in place. To put it mildly GWU is the most known branded school in DC (Not everyone can get into Georgetown, or want to travel to UMD/UVA - if they can get an admit).

I won't be surprised to see some big names like Simon - University of Rochester, Eller - Arizona, GTech etc close their MBA programs in next 7-10 years and move towards their core strength if the sentiments of recruiting companies and the government towards students doesn't change.
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Duncan
You think GWU is more known than Georgetown?
You think GWU is more known than Georgetown?
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Ayon
No, only a crazy person would think that GWU in more known than GT.
What I said was, it's the 2nd best known in DC area, and easiest to get into since not everyone can get into GT.
No, only a crazy person would think that GWU in more known than GT.
What I said was, it's the 2nd best known in DC area, and easiest to get into since not everyone can get into GT.
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mba hipste...
Good insights, Ayon.

One thing: The US b-schools don't rely on international students for their recruitment nearly as much as schools in the UK, so they'll be less susceptible to visa changes than their British counterparts. I think the most recent Georgetown MBA class had like 4% international students, for example.
Good insights, Ayon.

One thing: The US b-schools don't rely on international students for their recruitment nearly as much as schools in the UK, so they'll be less susceptible to visa changes than their British counterparts. I think the most recent Georgetown MBA class had like 4% international students, for example.
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