Do I need a ranked MBA program?


I have been reading through some discussions and it's clear that for US MBA programs, rankings are very important if one wants to work in the country after graduation. However, I am wondering if this is true if moving to the US permanently is not a goal.

Specifically, I work for my family's business, which does a lot of business with firms in the US. I have been advised that I should do my MBA in the US, so that I can better understand the business environment there, as well as make connections. I plan to not stay in the US much after graduation.

However, so far I haven't been able to get a GMAT score higher than 630. With that in mind I have shortlisted the following schools:

Fordham
DePaul - Kelstadt
Colorado State University
Georgia State - Robinson
Hofstra University - Zarb

I would much prefer Fordham since it's in New York City. I am open to other options as well and price is not a constraint.
I have been reading through some discussions and it's clear that for US MBA programs, rankings are very important if one wants to work in the country after graduation. However, I am wondering if this is true if moving to the US permanently is not a goal.

Specifically, I work for my family's business, which does a lot of business with firms in the US. I have been advised that I should do my MBA in the US, so that I can better understand the business environment there, as well as make connections. I plan to not stay in the US much after graduation.

However, so far I haven't been able to get a GMAT score higher than 630. With that in mind I have shortlisted the following schools:

Fordham
DePaul - Kelstadt
Colorado State University
Georgia State - Robinson
Hofstra University - Zarb

I would much prefer Fordham since it's in New York City. I am open to other options as well and price is not a constraint.
quote
ralph
You don't necessarily *need* a ranked program, but consider this: a ranked MBA program would provide more value over the long-term, even when it comes to the connections to other cohort participants. If connections are what you are looking for, being among the kind of high-caliber professionals that a ranked MBA program draws can be very helpful.

That said, none of those programs you are looking at would be a bad choice, per se. Narrow it down by location; also check LinkedIn to see what industries school places in - that will give you a good sense of the kind of people you would have in your cohort.

With a 630 GMAT score, look at the lower end of the Businessweek rankings, since there are other schools like Fordham. Schools like Thunderbird and Syracuse might be good to start with.
You don't necessarily *need* a ranked program, but consider this: a ranked MBA program would provide more value over the long-term, even when it comes to the connections to other cohort participants. If connections are what you are looking for, being among the kind of high-caliber professionals that a ranked MBA program draws can be very helpful.

That said, none of those programs you are looking at would be a bad choice, per se. Narrow it down by location; also check LinkedIn to see what industries school places in - that will give you a good sense of the kind of people you would have in your cohort.

With a 630 GMAT score, look at the lower end of the Businessweek rankings, since there are other schools like Fordham. Schools like Thunderbird and Syracuse might be good to start with.
quote
Thanks, you have given me a lot to think about. In terms of networking, how would you compare a full-time MBA experience with say cobbling together a number of executive education programs and certificates, which I would take in the US and Europe? I think this approach might give me access to a broader range of professionals.
Thanks, you have given me a lot to think about. In terms of networking, how would you compare a full-time MBA experience with say cobbling together a number of executive education programs and certificates, which I would take in the US and Europe? I think this approach might give me access to a broader range of professionals.
quote
ralph
That's one way to network, another is to attend conferences and simply reach out to people.

Both are vastly different experiences than a full-time MBA program, though.
That's one way to network, another is to attend conferences and simply reach out to people.

Both are vastly different experiences than a full-time MBA program, though.
quote
I see, thanks for your advice. I think I will continue to look at full time MBAs, just because I think the structured approach to general business topics would be better for me than just a smattering of programs. Plus, it would be nice to be in the US for a couple of years. :) I'm aiming for fall 2015 at Forhdam.
I see, thanks for your advice. I think I will continue to look at full time MBAs, just because I think the structured approach to general business topics would be better for me than just a smattering of programs. Plus, it would be nice to be in the US for a couple of years. :) I'm aiming for fall 2015 at Forhdam.
quote
ralph
I would tend to agree. Those executive education programs tend to be for a different type of participant with different expectations. Given your interest in New York City, you may also want to look at the CUNY Zicklin program if you are looking for alternatives.
I would tend to agree. Those executive education programs tend to be for a different type of participant with different expectations. Given your interest in New York City, you may also want to look at the CUNY Zicklin program if you are looking for alternatives.
quote
Thanks, I will look into this school as well. I would like to be in New York City.
Thanks, I will look into this school as well. I would like to be in New York City.
quote

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