Applications for two-year MBA programs rising for second year


Yilka
According to this article more people apply for the two-year US MBA programs while applications for the one-year MBA programs a declining:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/6f8a5afc-47e5-11e4-ac9f-00144feab7de.html#axzz3FA7XHHhu

I would have expected the opposite. I don't know many people who can afford to quit their job for two years. Strange...
According to this article more people apply for the two-year US MBA programs while applications for the one-year MBA programs a declining:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/6f8a5afc-47e5-11e4-ac9f-00144feab7de.html#axzz3FA7XHHhu

I would have expected the opposite. I don't know many people who can afford to quit their job for two years. Strange...
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Yilka
Interesting NY Times article about this topic, which comes with different stats:

"Enrollments [in the one-year MBA] are up 26 percent for Goizueta’s program over last year. Cornell enrolled its largest one-year M.B.A. class on its Ithaca campus..."

"The Graduate Management Admission Council counts 189 one-year programs, compared to 173 four years ago, and 55 percent of them have reported increases in applications over last year."

but:

"According to G.M.A.C.’s 2013 student poll, fewer job seekers from one-year programs (53 percent) had received offers by March than had students in the final year of two-year programs (61 percent). While one-year students reported an average 70 percent increase over pre-M.B.A. earnings, their earnings boost was 9 percent lower than what two-year students reported.

There are other drawbacks. Students don’t have time to spend a semester abroad. They forfeit some electives. They can join clubs but can’t lead them (presidents are picked the spring before they arrive). And elite business schools like Harvard, Wharton and Stanford don’t have one-year M.B.A.s. "

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/education/edlife/time-management-one-year-mbas.html?_r=0
Interesting NY Times article about this topic, which comes with different stats:

"Enrollments [in the one-year MBA] are up 26 percent for Goizueta’s program over last year. Cornell enrolled its largest one-year M.B.A. class on its Ithaca campus..."

"The Graduate Management Admission Council counts 189 one-year programs, compared to 173 four years ago, and 55 percent of them have reported increases in applications over last year."

but:

"According to G.M.A.C.’s 2013 student poll, fewer job seekers from one-year programs (53 percent) had received offers by March than had students in the final year of two-year programs (61 percent). While one-year students reported an average 70 percent increase over pre-M.B.A. earnings, their earnings boost was 9 percent lower than what two-year students reported.

There are other drawbacks. Students don’t have time to spend a semester abroad. They forfeit some electives. They can join clubs but can’t lead them (presidents are picked the spring before they arrive). And elite business schools like Harvard, Wharton and Stanford don’t have one-year M.B.A.s. "

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/education/edlife/time-management-one-year-mbas.html?_r=0

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badux
I think that for a couple of years in the depths of the crisis, people were more hesitant to pay for two year of schooling, and instead did part-time, one-year, or online MBAs... Now that things are looking a bit more positive on the macro level, a larger investment might make more sense.
I think that for a couple of years in the depths of the crisis, people were more hesitant to pay for two year of schooling, and instead did part-time, one-year, or online MBAs... Now that things are looking a bit more positive on the macro level, a larger investment might make more sense.
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