Technology related MSc.


Hello everyone,

My name is Ilias and I am from Greece. I have a conditional offer for the MSc. eBusiness and Innovation in Lancaster University School of Management, MSc. Information Management & Digital Business from Henley Business School and eBusiness Management from Warwick WMG. I have a bachelor in economics and 4 years of professional experience in digital marketing. My goal is to begin a career in tech consulting and digital transformation. Which of the above would you say will maximise my chances of doing that in terms of brand power and career service?

Thank you all in advance!

Hello everyone,

My name is Ilias and I am from Greece. I have a conditional offer for the MSc. eBusiness and Innovation in Lancaster University School of Management, MSc. Information Management & Digital Business from Henley Business School and eBusiness Management from Warwick WMG. I have a bachelor in economics and 4 years of professional experience in digital marketing. My goal is to begin a career in tech consulting and digital transformation. Which of the above would you say will maximise my chances of doing that in terms of brand power and career service?

Thank you all in advance!
quote
Duncan

Brand power really equates to alumni presence in the firms you want to attract, so use LinkedIn to see where alumni from those degrees are. 

I would exclude WMG, since the program design is so odd: you are not in a cohort, there are no classes most weeks, you don't have the sort of facilities ot a business school etc. 

The Lancaster programme is very well designed with good project elements and strong industry support from IBM and SAP. 

The Henley programme feels more oriented towards front end consultants and the BTC path feels very good for your goals. The Reading location is perfect. I would pick that. 

Brand power really equates to alumni presence in the firms you want to attract, so use LinkedIn to see where alumni from those degrees are.&nbsp;<br><br>I would exclude WMG, since the program design is so odd: you are not in a cohort, there are no classes most weeks, you don't have the sort of facilities ot a business school etc.&nbsp;<br><br>The Lancaster programme is very well designed with good project elements and strong industry support from IBM and SAP.&nbsp;<br><br>The Henley programme feels more oriented towards front end consultants and the BTC path feels very good for your goals. The Reading location is perfect. I would pick that.&nbsp;
quote

Brand power really equates to alumni presence in the firms you want to attract, so use LinkedIn to see where alumni from those degrees are. 

I would exclude WMG, since the program design is so odd: you are not in a cohort, there are no classes most weeks, you don't have the sort of facilities ot a business school etc. 

The Lancaster programme is very well designed with good project elements and strong industry support from IBM and SAP. 

The Henley programme feels more oriented towards front end consultants and the BTC path feels very good for your goals. The Reading location is perfect. I would pick that. 


Dear Duncan,
First of all thank you for replying. I have already done the linkedin search following your advice in other threads and it seems that lancaster alumni are one step forward in terms of career advancement overall. A question I  have regarding Henley is that much of its popularity comes from its MBA and its executive education degrees. Would you say that's accurate based on your experience?
Thank you again for time.
Ilias

[quote]Brand power really equates to alumni presence in the firms you want to attract, so use LinkedIn to see where alumni from those degrees are.&nbsp;<br><br>I would exclude WMG, since the program design is so odd: you are not in a cohort, there are no classes most weeks, you don't have the sort of facilities ot a business school etc.&nbsp;<br><br>The Lancaster programme is very well designed with good project elements and strong industry support from IBM and SAP.&nbsp;<br><br>The Henley programme feels more oriented towards front end consultants and the BTC path feels very good for your goals. The Reading location is perfect. I would pick that.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Dear Duncan,<br>First of all thank you for replying. I have already done the linkedin search following your advice in other threads and it seems that lancaster alumni are one step forward in terms of career advancement overall. A question I &nbsp;have regarding Henley is that much of its popularity comes from its MBA and its executive education degrees. Would you say that's accurate based on your experience?<br>Thank you again for time.<br>Ilias
quote
Duncan

Yes, I think that's fair. Henley always struggled with its full-time MBA even before joining Reading. The EMBA at the Henley campus is well ahead of the offer on the Reading campus. But, it's a good university and ranked fairly. 

Yes, I think that's fair. Henley always struggled with its full-time MBA even before joining Reading. The EMBA at the Henley campus is well ahead of the offer on the Reading campus. But, it's a good university and ranked fairly.&nbsp;
quote
aslamo

That Lancaster course seems a very good mix of business and technology but I wouldn't get too carried away by the IBM and SAP partnerships.
During the massive boom in Enterprise Resource Planning systems like SAP around the millennium, there were at least two masters courses that included modules to become a certified SAP solutions consultant. One was Sheffield University if I remember rightly. I ended up working for a large business/technology consultancy where such degrees were not considered to be a good enough grounding in IT. That consultancy paid for me to do the standalone SAP training.

However, the Lancaster module doesn't seem to have the same structure and looks like a more general introduction to business processes and analysis. If so, it should be good as when I did my SAP training at SAP's own academy, business process analysis was arguably the strongest and most useful part of the course. 

The IBM module on architecture also looks good although IBM are nowhere near the tech titan they used to be when I worked for them in the late 80s.

Such a course should set you up well for a career in consulting.

That Lancaster course seems a very good mix of business and technology but I wouldn't get too carried away by the IBM and SAP partnerships.<br>During the massive boom in Enterprise Resource Planning systems like SAP around the millennium, there were at least two masters courses that included modules to become a certified SAP solutions consultant. One was Sheffield University if I remember rightly. I ended up working for a large business/technology consultancy where such degrees were not considered to be a good enough grounding in IT. That consultancy paid for me to do the standalone SAP training.<br><br>However, the Lancaster module doesn't seem to have the same structure and looks like a more general introduction to business processes and analysis. If so, it should be good as when I did my SAP training at SAP's own academy, business process analysis was arguably the strongest and most useful part of the course.&nbsp;<br><br>The IBM module on architecture also looks good although IBM are nowhere near the tech titan they used to be when I worked for them in the late 80s.<br><br>Such a course should set you up well for a career in consulting.
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