Manchester vs Warwick vs Imperial


blitzkrieg

Which one to apply for?

Profile details:
Indian, male, engineer (23 yrs). GMAT: 730.
Work ex: 2 years and 3 months in IT (functional testing). Will have 3 by next yr.
Post MBA goal: Want to move into product management (within the technology sector)

I am already applying to Oxford, but I also want to apply to one safe school in UK. I see that Imperial > Manchester > Warwick as per the FT mba rankings. but which school is the best considering my profile and post-MBA goals. Also, which one has better placements for international students (% employed) and better international reputation?

Besides, are there any other schools that I should look at (like Cass, lancaster, Strathclyde etc.)

Please suggest.

Which one to apply for?

Profile details:
Indian, male, engineer (23 yrs). GMAT: 730.
Work ex: 2 years and 3 months in IT (functional testing). Will have 3 by next yr.
Post MBA goal: Want to move into product management (within the technology sector)

I am already applying to Oxford, but I also want to apply to one safe school in UK. I see that Imperial > Manchester > Warwick as per the FT mba rankings. but which school is the best considering my profile and post-MBA goals. Also, which one has better placements for international students (% employed) and better international reputation?

Besides, are there any other schools that I should look at (like Cass, lancaster, Strathclyde etc.)

Please suggest.
quote
yipkc

blitzkrieg,

while that's a good GMAT score you had achieved, your level of work experience is still not ready for the top tier MBA. You will be better off working for another 2-3 years before starting on an MBA.

blitzkrieg,

while that's a good GMAT score you had achieved, your level of work experience is still not ready for the top tier MBA. You will be better off working for another 2-3 years before starting on an MBA.
quote
blitzkrieg

blitzkrieg,

while that's a good GMAT score you had achieved, your level of work experience is still not ready for the top tier MBA. You will be better off working for another 2-3 years before starting on an MBA.
Well there are some personal reasons why I'm looking for an MBA next year. It'll be difficult after that.

Isn't 2-3 years the minimum for most MBA programs? Since I have the bare minimum required, won't an above average GMAT score and undergrad performance not compensate for that? Would you recommend re-taking the GMAT?

[Edited by blitzkrieg on Sep 09, 2016]

[quote]blitzkrieg,

while that's a good GMAT score you had achieved, your level of work experience is still not ready for the top tier MBA. You will be better off working for another 2-3 years before starting on an MBA. [/quote]Well there are some personal reasons why I'm looking for an MBA next year. It'll be difficult after that.

Isn't 2-3 years the minimum for most MBA programs? Since I have the bare minimum required, won't an above average GMAT score and undergrad performance not compensate for that? Would you recommend re-taking the GMAT?
quote
yipkc

No, you don't have to retake the GMAT. In my perspective, it's about how much you would gain from the course. At such a relatively young age, I don't think you would benefit much from a 1 year MBA with students of an average age of close to 30 years old. Have you consider doing a 2 year MBA from the USA instead? Top schools do accept applicants with 2-3 years of work experience.

No, you don't have to retake the GMAT. In my perspective, it's about how much you would gain from the course. At such a relatively young age, I don't think you would benefit much from a 1 year MBA with students of an average age of close to 30 years old. Have you consider doing a 2 year MBA from the USA instead? Top schools do accept applicants with 2-3 years of work experience.
quote
blitzkrieg

No, you don't have to retake the GMAT. In my perspective, it's about how much you would gain from the course. At such a relatively young age, I don't think you would benefit much from a 1 year MBA with students of an average age of close to 30 years old. Have you consider doing a 2 year MBA from the USA instead? Top schools do accept applicants with 2-3 years of work experience.
Well, even schools in the US mostly have on average 5-6 years of work ex. I'm applying to McCombs in the US, but there also the average work ex is 5.5 years (about the same as Oxford). H/S/W or other tier 1 schools are out of question as I don't have a very stellar profile.

The UK/European B schools seem to be just about a year older/experienced compared to those in US. Would that make a big difference?

Also, if you're looking for a career change, wouldn't it be easier early in your career?

[Edited by blitzkrieg on Sep 09, 2016]

[quote]No, you don't have to retake the GMAT. In my perspective, it's about how much you would gain from the course. At such a relatively young age, I don't think you would benefit much from a 1 year MBA with students of an average age of close to 30 years old. Have you consider doing a 2 year MBA from the USA instead? Top schools do accept applicants with 2-3 years of work experience. [/quote]Well, even schools in the US mostly have on average 5-6 years of work ex. I'm applying to McCombs in the US, but there also the average work ex is 5.5 years (about the same as Oxford). H/S/W or other tier 1 schools are out of question as I don't have a very stellar profile.

The UK/European B schools seem to be just about a year older/experienced compared to those in US. Would that make a big difference?

Also, if you're looking for a career change, wouldn't it be easier early in your career?
quote

Reply to Post

Related Business Schools

Manchester, United Kingdom 65 Followers 515 Discussions
Coventry, United Kingdom 100 Followers 587 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 107 Followers 348 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 70 Followers 278 Discussions

Other Related Content

Oct 12, 2023

Calling All German MBA Hopefuls: Join the e-fellows MBA Days in Frankfurt and Hamburg

News Oct 12, 2023

Beyond London: MBA Programs in England

Article Jun 08, 2012

How MBA programs outside the capital can offer global, practical experience