Henely vs Aston vs Edinburgh vs Bristol vs Leeds


crashed
i searched all the given school. i found these are top most schools in the world and Gmat is mandatory plus the country in which anyonbdy desire to get good job after Msc, should speak local language and it would be better if he has a bit knowledge of respective country.
so for me, it seems a long chase to get a good MSc school as i have to have GMAT and ILETS, cracking GMAT and getting 7 band in ILETS is not easy for person like me who is not native english speaker(Indian) and living in very small town where no body knows about GMAT and ILETS and where no coaching is available.
so ...................crashed ........ although thank you duncn sir.




o i have some thing for them who want to study in switzerland and if some body have something for me then plz suggest.

in a high-density crescent between
Lake Constance and Lake Geneva.

As a democratic nation modeled in part on the United States
government, Switzerland operates a federal republic; its national
government institutions include a bicameral legislature, a collegial
executive, and a judiciary. Despite a lack of raw materials,
Switzerland is a key player in world trade and is one of the world's
wealthiest industrial nations. The nation's gross national product
(GNP), which is higher than that of any other European state,
reflects its highly developed economy and its important role within
European and international commerce.

Professional Resources
As a historically neutral nation, Switzerland is not a member of the
European Union or the United Nations. However, it does belong to
the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
and hosts the United Nations in Geneva. The country depends
heavily on international trade and has bi-lateral agreements with
most countries involved in international commerce.

SBN (Swiss Business Network), which provides users with Swiss
business and residence directories, is a useful tool for foreign
job-seekers. More than 5 million entries are available, and the SBN
website is in four languages. The Chambers of Commerce and
Industry of Switzerland (Swiss Federation of Commerce and Industry)
is the central organization of 20 Swiss chambers of commerce. The
organization provides support and information to members, as well as
providing access to a databank of firms in Switzerland.

The Swiss Organization for Facilitating Investment (SOFI) was
created by the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) in
co-operation with KPMG to encourage, facilitate and contribute to
the effective implementation of investment projects between Swiss
companies and counterparts from other countries. It is a
one-stop-shop that combines both public and private sector
services.

Job Search Resources
With Switzerland's low unemployment rate, many Swiss job-seekers
have few problems finding new jobs or changing careers. Internet
resources are among the most popular job-searching tools. The
number of online job sites is constantly growing as more and more
companies advertise employment opportunities online. In general, the
Swiss labor market is considered "dry," and many major companies
are constantly hunting for qualified employees. English-only speakers
should be aware that many online job banks and career portals are
only available in French or German.

Adecco is a large recruiting agency, with 75 branches throughout
Switzerland. This firm seeks to place employees in the following
sectors: information technology, industry, construction, tourism,
clerical and medical. Adecco can also aid in summer job placement.
Individual branches can be contacted through their website, which
will provide local employment opportunities. Their website is available
in Dutch, French, Italian, and English.

Job fairs and career events are not as common in Switzerland as
they are in the EU countries. The private recruitment firms, spread
evenly across the country, offer a great variety of vacancies in all
cantons. In recent years, a few recruitment forums have been
organized by EMDS, a well established company providing a broad
range of recruitment services worldwide. The expertise of EMDS is in
connecting high-caliber graduates and early-career professionals
with corporate opportunities around the globe.

Financial Considerations
Compared to France, Italy and Germany, the cost of living in
Switzerland is quite high. The Swiss housing is becoming increasingly
tight, especially in major urban centers. There is a shortage of land
for building and many people wanting to live in the same area. Rents
are high, around 25 to 33 percent of average net income. Most
foreigners living and working in Switzerland rent housing. Local
newspapers usually have properties for rent in their Wednesday and
weekend editions. There are also free newspapers dedicated solely to
real estate.

The tax bill will come in two parts. Both the federal government and
the Cantons levy taxes, including income tax, fire service tax, church
tax, property or wealth tax, federal tax and value added tax (VAT).
The Canton and Community tax bill will usually come in February.
Partial payments can be made throughout the year; however, if paid
in total before the end of April, you may deduct around 2.5 percent
from the amount of tax due. The Federal tax bill must be paid by
March 31st, and the reduction is around 3.5 percent if it is paid in
advance every two years. A tax expert or local bank official may be
helpful and is recommended especially to foreigners because of
possible language difficulties in this highly technical, legal framework.

Employment Trends


Switzerland has enjoyed a steady labor market for the last decade,
and job opportunities are plentiful. In 2000, the nation's
unemployment rate was at its lowest since 1992, and Switzerland's
current economic outlook looks solid. Although in the past the
country has been well known for its restrictions against foreign labor,
Switzerland lacks highly qualified labor in various science-intensive
industries, such as IT, engineering, and medical services. As a result,
the restrictions imposed on import of foreign labor, mainly executives
and certain specialists, have been eased in recent years.

Resume/CV's
Switzerland presents a few complications for the international
jobseeker. First, there are four official languages, although only three
(German, French and Italian) are spoken widely. English is a common
language, especially in the international business sector.

A second complication is that the most common way to get a job in
Switzerland is through personal contacts and networking. The higher
your rank, and the better your credentials, the more respect you will
receive. However, depending on your nationality, it may be a long
time before you receive the same respect (and salary) as your Swiss
counterpart.

There are two resume formats in Switzerland-the German, and the
English. Use the English version for international companies, unless
they specify otherwise. The resume in German is lengthy (two to
three pages of A4 paper), and very detailed; it uses a chronological
order, and has a number of attachments, such as grades, references,
and a photo. The English version is shorter (one to two pages, typed
on A4 paper), in reverse-chronological order, with less detail and no
attachments, unless they have been requested.

Applications by e-mail are increasingly common, particularly from
overseas applicants.

Information Technology
As Switzerland rapidly expands its high-tech sector, IT specialists
are growing in demand. Yet since most Swiss educational institutes
and universities lack the necessary programs and resources to train
IT professionals, many Swiss companies rely on the labor of foreign
specialists, particularly from Eastern and Central Europe, the former
Soviet Union, and Asia. Switzerland witnessed an increase of 7.5
percent in IT employment between 1999 and 2000.

Academic degrees issued by Swiss universities and technical higher
education institutions are called "Lizenz" (license). In order to reach
a senior position in IT field, one normally has to have a license
obtained from a Swiss higher education institution or an equivalent
(such as a Master's Degree) obtained from a recognized foreign
higher education institution. On an academic scale, a Swiss IT
license is somewhere between a British BSc and MSc or a bit higher
than American MSc degree. The Swiss Technical Association (STV) is
the largest professional organization for engineers and technicians in
all aspects of IT.

Interviewing Advice
When applying for a position in Switzerland, it is wise to research the
company thoroughly and, if you need more information, to call the
contact person for details. Review your skills and the demands of the
job, and prepare a list of questions you would like to ask.

Dress neatly and conservatively. Dark business suits are appropriate
for men and women. The Swiss appreciate cleanliness-and
punctuality, so be sure to be on time.

The interview itself will start as scheduled, and will begin with
introductions, handshakes, and the exchange of business cards.
There is great respect for age and professional titles. Address those
present by title and surname. Your business card can be in English,
and should list your own title(s).

During the discussion, maintain eye contact and a modest demeanor.
Listen carefully to the questions, and answer them directly and in an
organized manner. Expect questions about your qualifications and
experience, your strong and weak points, and the reasons you think
you fill their needs. Feel free to ask your own questions, those
regarding responsibilities, lines of authority, and your colleagues, and
those that reveal your own insight and creativity.

Engineering
Paralleling positive employment trends across all Swiss industries, in
the last two years the number of people involved in industry has
risen to 13.4 percent. As a highly industrialized nation, Switzerland's
workforce consists mainly of employees working in capital-intensive
and science-intensive fields, rather than labor-intensive and
material-intensive industries.

Engineers in Switzerland have to have a relevant degree from a
technical higher education institution (such as a university or
poly-technical institute), called "Diplom" ("Diploma"). On an academic
scale, a Swiss engineering "Diplom" is somewhere between a British
BSc and MSc or a bit higher than American MSc degree.

The Swiss Technical Association (Schweizerischer Technischer
Verband, STV) is the main professional organization for technical
staff in Switzerland. Established in 1905, STV unites 17,000 qualified
engineers and architects. The Association deals with national and
International professional issues, and has a wide network of
profession-wide and industry-wide links determined by
interdisciplinary and open approaches.

Work Permits
If you plan to visit (and not work) in Switzerland for fewer than three
months, you do not need a residence permit. However, if you're a
non-Western European, you are required to have a current passport
with a visa. No foreigner can stay longer than a total of six months in
residence per year.

Switzerland does not use the term "work permit" as used elsewhere in
Europe. The Swiss residence permit (Aufenthaltsbewilligung,
autorisation de séjour), which is difficult to obtain, is a combination
residence-work permit. A Swiss residence permit only allows one to
live in a particular residence in a particular Canton and to work for
only one specified employer. Be aware that change of job, residence,
or Canton requires re-application and re-approval. Approval is not
guaranteed.

Only when the prospective employer receives government approval to
hire you can you begin seriously planning your move. The prospective
employer sends the government approval letter, together with your
employment contract and start date of your employment to you.
Bring these documents and your passport into Switzerland. Foreigners
are issued a Residence Permit (Auslanderausweis, livert pour
etrangers), which must be carried at all times.

Accounting & Finance
Switzerland is a country of banks, insurance companies and financial
services, with 394 registered banks and financial service companies.
This fact, together with the existence of numerous multinational and
domestic companies, keeps the demand for labor in finance and
accounting steady.

In addition to a business, financial or accounting education,
employers are often interested in candidates possessing IT training
and knowledge of specific financial software packages. Many firms
have adopted such tools as OFA (Oracle Financial Application), SAP
(Systems Applications Products), and Bloomberg, and employers
often seek potential applicants who are familiar with these systems.
Knowledge of SAP and Hyperion Enterprise is particularly
advantageous for work in large, multinational Swiss finance
companies. Training in Oracle Financial Application and knowledge of
Microsoft Office are compulsory requirements to work in Swiss
finance and accounting.

The official Swiss accounting and finance qualifications, called
Fachausweis Buchhalter, Fachausweis Controller and Diplomierter
Buchalter/Controller, are supported and recognized by the Ministry
for Professional Education and Technology. Normally Swiss employers
require one of these qualifications for managerial positions in
accounting, finance or controlling in cases when candidates do not
possess higher education degrees in finance, economics or business
administration. The VEB (Federation of Accounting and Controllers) is
the largest Swiss professional association in this industry.

Cultural Advice
If you're planning a trip or move to Switzerland, keep the following
cultural tips in mind:

? Although the three official languages of Switzerland are German,
French, and Italian, knowledge of English is becoming more
widespread. It is not necessary for business visitors to learn one of
the official languages, but if you're anticipating a longer residence in
Switzerland, it will help to know some of the language to deal with
everyday activities, such as marketing, public transportation, and
dealing with others in the business world.

? Be sure to carry a good supply of business cards. Always give one
to the secretary to keep on file, as well as to hand out to everyone
at the meeting. Swiss Germans like to begin business quickly. French
and Italian Swiss tend to spend some time exchanging pleasantries
beforehand. Conversations may include sports, Swiss history,
culture, or one's travels to the country. They also enjoy politics, so
it is wise to brush up on one's current events or spend more time
listening than talking. Avoid talking about subjects that are too
personal, discussions about money or possessions, or dieting while at
a business meal.

? The Swiss tend to be very formal in business dealings. It is rare one
will lose their temper or criticize another during a business meeting.
But their formality can appear to keep them at a distance. For these
reasons, assumptions on business deals should not be made; rather it
is wise to keep all necessary parties informed of decisions and the
course of action required in any negotiation.

? Guests should always be on time. A gift of a small bouquet of
flowers (odd number of flowers) or candy for the hostess is
appropriate. Avoid carnations and chrysanthemums, which signify
bad luck and death. One should always wipe his or her feet before
entering the house. Upon leaving, it customary to shake hands with
the entire family, and do not stay too late. It is always appropriate
to follow up with a thank you note the next day.
Sales & Marketing
The Swiss economy is service-oriented; in 2000, almost 70 percent
of the total productive population was involved in the tertiary sector
of the economy. The Swiss sales and marketing industry offers a
variety of professional career options, which play a very important
role in Swiss domestic and international commerce. Industry experts
predict that job opportunities in sales and marketing will remain
stable as revenue-hungry companies continue to analyze potential
markets and promote and sell their products.

Job-seekers looking for a position in sales and marketing should have
an educational certificate or diploma in general business, economics,
or business administration. Many higher educational institutions,
including the International Institute for Management Development
(IMD), the International University in Geneva and the University of
Basel, offer course programs in economics, which include sales and
marketing. Publications such as IO Management, a monthly
professional magazine featuring news in management, marketing,
general business and economy, are good resources for sales and
marketing job-seekers. BOOM is a popular monthly magazine for
entrepreneurs publishing news in marketing, sales, technology,
e-business, and finance. Both publications are available in print and
online.

General Business
The Swiss service sector, particularly the banking and financial
services industries, drives the country's economy. Although
Switzerland has enjoyed high levels of economic prosperity, product
market inflexibility and protection of select industries have impaired
productivity growth. Recently Switzerland has instituted reform in the
telecommunications, rail and postal industries, which has increased
competition and alleviated inflationary pressures.

Numerous job opportunities exist for management consultants in
Switzerland. Job-seekers can utilize Swiss trade unions and
organizations, such as the FEACO, which assists in promoting and
developing the management consultancy profession in Europe.
Job-seekers can also use the whimsically-named Yoodle, a Swiss
online directory. The Yoodle website provides access to hundreds of
consultant links in Switzerland.
<blockquote>i searched all the given school. i found these are top most schools in the world and Gmat is mandatory plus the country in which anyonbdy desire to get good job after Msc, should speak local language and it would be better if he has a bit knowledge of respective country.
so for me, it seems a long chase to get a good MSc school as i have to have GMAT and ILETS, cracking GMAT and getting 7 band in ILETS is not easy for person like me who is not native english speaker(Indian) and living in very small town where no body knows about GMAT and ILETS and where no coaching is available.
so ...................crashed ........ although thank you duncn sir.

</blockquote>




o i have some thing for them who want to study in switzerland and if some body have something for me then plz suggest.

in a high-density crescent between
Lake Constance and Lake Geneva.

As a democratic nation modeled in part on the United States
government, Switzerland operates a federal republic; its national
government institutions include a bicameral legislature, a collegial
executive, and a judiciary. Despite a lack of raw materials,
Switzerland is a key player in world trade and is one of the world's
wealthiest industrial nations. The nation's gross national product
(GNP), which is higher than that of any other European state,
reflects its highly developed economy and its important role within
European and international commerce.

Professional Resources
As a historically neutral nation, Switzerland is not a member of the
European Union or the United Nations. However, it does belong to
the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
and hosts the United Nations in Geneva. The country depends
heavily on international trade and has bi-lateral agreements with
most countries involved in international commerce.

SBN (Swiss Business Network), which provides users with Swiss
business and residence directories, is a useful tool for foreign
job-seekers. More than 5 million entries are available, and the SBN
website is in four languages. The Chambers of Commerce and
Industry of Switzerland (Swiss Federation of Commerce and Industry)
is the central organization of 20 Swiss chambers of commerce. The
organization provides support and information to members, as well as
providing access to a databank of firms in Switzerland.

The Swiss Organization for Facilitating Investment (SOFI) was
created by the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) in
co-operation with KPMG to encourage, facilitate and contribute to
the effective implementation of investment projects between Swiss
companies and counterparts from other countries. It is a
one-stop-shop that combines both public and private sector
services.

Job Search Resources
With Switzerland's low unemployment rate, many Swiss job-seekers
have few problems finding new jobs or changing careers. Internet
resources are among the most popular job-searching tools. The
number of online job sites is constantly growing as more and more
companies advertise employment opportunities online. In general, the
Swiss labor market is considered "dry," and many major companies
are constantly hunting for qualified employees. English-only speakers
should be aware that many online job banks and career portals are
only available in French or German.

Adecco is a large recruiting agency, with 75 branches throughout
Switzerland. This firm seeks to place employees in the following
sectors: information technology, industry, construction, tourism,
clerical and medical. Adecco can also aid in summer job placement.
Individual branches can be contacted through their website, which
will provide local employment opportunities. Their website is available
in Dutch, French, Italian, and English.

Job fairs and career events are not as common in Switzerland as
they are in the EU countries. The private recruitment firms, spread
evenly across the country, offer a great variety of vacancies in all
cantons. In recent years, a few recruitment forums have been
organized by EMDS, a well established company providing a broad
range of recruitment services worldwide. The expertise of EMDS is in
connecting high-caliber graduates and early-career professionals
with corporate opportunities around the globe.

Financial Considerations
Compared to France, Italy and Germany, the cost of living in
Switzerland is quite high. The Swiss housing is becoming increasingly
tight, especially in major urban centers. There is a shortage of land
for building and many people wanting to live in the same area. Rents
are high, around 25 to 33 percent of average net income. Most
foreigners living and working in Switzerland rent housing. Local
newspapers usually have properties for rent in their Wednesday and
weekend editions. There are also free newspapers dedicated solely to
real estate.

The tax bill will come in two parts. Both the federal government and
the Cantons levy taxes, including income tax, fire service tax, church
tax, property or wealth tax, federal tax and value added tax (VAT).
The Canton and Community tax bill will usually come in February.
Partial payments can be made throughout the year; however, if paid
in total before the end of April, you may deduct around 2.5 percent
from the amount of tax due. The Federal tax bill must be paid by
March 31st, and the reduction is around 3.5 percent if it is paid in
advance every two years. A tax expert or local bank official may be
helpful and is recommended especially to foreigners because of
possible language difficulties in this highly technical, legal framework.

Employment Trends


Switzerland has enjoyed a steady labor market for the last decade,
and job opportunities are plentiful. In 2000, the nation's
unemployment rate was at its lowest since 1992, and Switzerland's
current economic outlook looks solid. Although in the past the
country has been well known for its restrictions against foreign labor,
Switzerland lacks highly qualified labor in various science-intensive
industries, such as IT, engineering, and medical services. As a result,
the restrictions imposed on import of foreign labor, mainly executives
and certain specialists, have been eased in recent years.

Resume/CV's
Switzerland presents a few complications for the international
jobseeker. First, there are four official languages, although only three
(German, French and Italian) are spoken widely. English is a common
language, especially in the international business sector.

A second complication is that the most common way to get a job in
Switzerland is through personal contacts and networking. The higher
your rank, and the better your credentials, the more respect you will
receive. However, depending on your nationality, it may be a long
time before you receive the same respect (and salary) as your Swiss
counterpart.

There are two resume formats in Switzerland-the German, and the
English. Use the English version for international companies, unless
they specify otherwise. The resume in German is lengthy (two to
three pages of A4 paper), and very detailed; it uses a chronological
order, and has a number of attachments, such as grades, references,
and a photo. The English version is shorter (one to two pages, typed
on A4 paper), in reverse-chronological order, with less detail and no
attachments, unless they have been requested.

Applications by e-mail are increasingly common, particularly from
overseas applicants.

Information Technology
As Switzerland rapidly expands its high-tech sector, IT specialists
are growing in demand. Yet since most Swiss educational institutes
and universities lack the necessary programs and resources to train
IT professionals, many Swiss companies rely on the labor of foreign
specialists, particularly from Eastern and Central Europe, the former
Soviet Union, and Asia. Switzerland witnessed an increase of 7.5
percent in IT employment between 1999 and 2000.

Academic degrees issued by Swiss universities and technical higher
education institutions are called "Lizenz" (license). In order to reach
a senior position in IT field, one normally has to have a license
obtained from a Swiss higher education institution or an equivalent
(such as a Master's Degree) obtained from a recognized foreign
higher education institution. On an academic scale, a Swiss IT
license is somewhere between a British BSc and MSc or a bit higher
than American MSc degree. The Swiss Technical Association (STV) is
the largest professional organization for engineers and technicians in
all aspects of IT.

Interviewing Advice
When applying for a position in Switzerland, it is wise to research the
company thoroughly and, if you need more information, to call the
contact person for details. Review your skills and the demands of the
job, and prepare a list of questions you would like to ask.

Dress neatly and conservatively. Dark business suits are appropriate
for men and women. The Swiss appreciate cleanliness-and
punctuality, so be sure to be on time.

The interview itself will start as scheduled, and will begin with
introductions, handshakes, and the exchange of business cards.
There is great respect for age and professional titles. Address those
present by title and surname. Your business card can be in English,
and should list your own title(s).

During the discussion, maintain eye contact and a modest demeanor.
Listen carefully to the questions, and answer them directly and in an
organized manner. Expect questions about your qualifications and
experience, your strong and weak points, and the reasons you think
you fill their needs. Feel free to ask your own questions, those
regarding responsibilities, lines of authority, and your colleagues, and
those that reveal your own insight and creativity.

Engineering
Paralleling positive employment trends across all Swiss industries, in
the last two years the number of people involved in industry has
risen to 13.4 percent. As a highly industrialized nation, Switzerland's
workforce consists mainly of employees working in capital-intensive
and science-intensive fields, rather than labor-intensive and
material-intensive industries.

Engineers in Switzerland have to have a relevant degree from a
technical higher education institution (such as a university or
poly-technical institute), called "Diplom" ("Diploma"). On an academic
scale, a Swiss engineering "Diplom" is somewhere between a British
BSc and MSc or a bit higher than American MSc degree.

The Swiss Technical Association (Schweizerischer Technischer
Verband, STV) is the main professional organization for technical
staff in Switzerland. Established in 1905, STV unites 17,000 qualified
engineers and architects. The Association deals with national and
International professional issues, and has a wide network of
profession-wide and industry-wide links determined by
interdisciplinary and open approaches.

Work Permits
If you plan to visit (and not work) in Switzerland for fewer than three
months, you do not need a residence permit. However, if you're a
non-Western European, you are required to have a current passport
with a visa. No foreigner can stay longer than a total of six months in
residence per year.

Switzerland does not use the term "work permit" as used elsewhere in
Europe. The Swiss residence permit (Aufenthaltsbewilligung,
autorisation de séjour), which is difficult to obtain, is a combination
residence-work permit. A Swiss residence permit only allows one to
live in a particular residence in a particular Canton and to work for
only one specified employer. Be aware that change of job, residence,
or Canton requires re-application and re-approval. Approval is not
guaranteed.

Only when the prospective employer receives government approval to
hire you can you begin seriously planning your move. The prospective
employer sends the government approval letter, together with your
employment contract and start date of your employment to you.
Bring these documents and your passport into Switzerland. Foreigners
are issued a Residence Permit (Auslanderausweis, livert pour
etrangers), which must be carried at all times.

Accounting & Finance
Switzerland is a country of banks, insurance companies and financial
services, with 394 registered banks and financial service companies.
This fact, together with the existence of numerous multinational and
domestic companies, keeps the demand for labor in finance and
accounting steady.

In addition to a business, financial or accounting education,
employers are often interested in candidates possessing IT training
and knowledge of specific financial software packages. Many firms
have adopted such tools as OFA (Oracle Financial Application), SAP
(Systems Applications Products), and Bloomberg, and employers
often seek potential applicants who are familiar with these systems.
Knowledge of SAP and Hyperion Enterprise is particularly
advantageous for work in large, multinational Swiss finance
companies. Training in Oracle Financial Application and knowledge of
Microsoft Office are compulsory requirements to work in Swiss
finance and accounting.

The official Swiss accounting and finance qualifications, called
Fachausweis Buchhalter, Fachausweis Controller and Diplomierter
Buchalter/Controller, are supported and recognized by the Ministry
for Professional Education and Technology. Normally Swiss employers
require one of these qualifications for managerial positions in
accounting, finance or controlling in cases when candidates do not
possess higher education degrees in finance, economics or business
administration. The VEB (Federation of Accounting and Controllers) is
the largest Swiss professional association in this industry.

Cultural Advice
If you're planning a trip or move to Switzerland, keep the following
cultural tips in mind:

? Although the three official languages of Switzerland are German,
French, and Italian, knowledge of English is becoming more
widespread. It is not necessary for business visitors to learn one of
the official languages, but if you're anticipating a longer residence in
Switzerland, it will help to know some of the language to deal with
everyday activities, such as marketing, public transportation, and
dealing with others in the business world.

? Be sure to carry a good supply of business cards. Always give one
to the secretary to keep on file, as well as to hand out to everyone
at the meeting. Swiss Germans like to begin business quickly. French
and Italian Swiss tend to spend some time exchanging pleasantries
beforehand. Conversations may include sports, Swiss history,
culture, or one's travels to the country. They also enjoy politics, so
it is wise to brush up on one's current events or spend more time
listening than talking. Avoid talking about subjects that are too
personal, discussions about money or possessions, or dieting while at
a business meal.

? The Swiss tend to be very formal in business dealings. It is rare one
will lose their temper or criticize another during a business meeting.
But their formality can appear to keep them at a distance. For these
reasons, assumptions on business deals should not be made; rather it
is wise to keep all necessary parties informed of decisions and the
course of action required in any negotiation.

? Guests should always be on time. A gift of a small bouquet of
flowers (odd number of flowers) or candy for the hostess is
appropriate. Avoid carnations and chrysanthemums, which signify
bad luck and death. One should always wipe his or her feet before
entering the house. Upon leaving, it customary to shake hands with
the entire family, and do not stay too late. It is always appropriate
to follow up with a thank you note the next day.
Sales & Marketing
The Swiss economy is service-oriented; in 2000, almost 70 percent
of the total productive population was involved in the tertiary sector
of the economy. The Swiss sales and marketing industry offers a
variety of professional career options, which play a very important
role in Swiss domestic and international commerce. Industry experts
predict that job opportunities in sales and marketing will remain
stable as revenue-hungry companies continue to analyze potential
markets and promote and sell their products.

Job-seekers looking for a position in sales and marketing should have
an educational certificate or diploma in general business, economics,
or business administration. Many higher educational institutions,
including the International Institute for Management Development
(IMD), the International University in Geneva and the University of
Basel, offer course programs in economics, which include sales and
marketing. Publications such as IO Management, a monthly
professional magazine featuring news in management, marketing,
general business and economy, are good resources for sales and
marketing job-seekers. BOOM is a popular monthly magazine for
entrepreneurs publishing news in marketing, sales, technology,
e-business, and finance. Both publications are available in print and
online.

General Business
The Swiss service sector, particularly the banking and financial
services industries, drives the country's economy. Although
Switzerland has enjoyed high levels of economic prosperity, product
market inflexibility and protection of select industries have impaired
productivity growth. Recently Switzerland has instituted reform in the
telecommunications, rail and postal industries, which has increased
competition and alleviated inflationary pressures.

Numerous job opportunities exist for management consultants in
Switzerland. Job-seekers can utilize Swiss trade unions and
organizations, such as the FEACO, which assists in promoting and
developing the management consultancy profession in Europe.
Job-seekers can also use the whimsically-named Yoodle, a Swiss
online directory. The Yoodle website provides access to hundreds of
consultant links in Switzerland.

quote
Duncan
Crashed, this board is about the UK so I suggest that the stuff on Switzerland might be better off on the Europe board. Perhaps just give links to where you took this material, rather than cutting and pasting in.

I think you need to shift your mindset a little, and staring thinking about options. $25,000 is a lot of money and it buys a lot of support. If you went to an inexpensive place you might even be able stretch the budget to cover both an intensive pre-MSc programme (which would focus on your English and quantitative skills) and an MSc.

You'll need to take the time to research these programmes, because I'm an expert in MBAs, and you need a programme aimed at recent undergraduates, but there are pre-MBA programmes like :
http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=1928&p=20439 and there will be many programmes like this aimed at pre-MSc students. I suggest you take a few hours to find ones that fit your needs and budget,

I have taken a few minutes and found a few here which mostly look for a 5.5 IELTS score:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/foundation/businessandenglish/
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/English-Language-courses/Pre-Masters/
http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/cele/preliminaryyearprogramme/preliminaryyearcourses/pgpremasterprogramme.aspx
http://www.worc.ac.uk/journey/international-pre-masters-diploma.html
http://www.dcu.ie/prospective/deginfo.php?
classname=IFP&originating_school=61
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/pathway/premasters/
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/english-language/eap/

Some of these programmes even lead to a qualification in their own right, like the St. Andrews Diploma in Business and English, and might be enough by themselves to help your employment prospects.

I am not sure that any of these are right for you, but I know that if you research you will find the right way forward. However, right now, with your degree there are nots of grea jobs available to you which don't involve handling pharmaceuticals - and better English and another qualification will help you more.
Crashed, this board is about the UK so I suggest that the stuff on Switzerland might be better off on the Europe board. Perhaps just give links to where you took this material, rather than cutting and pasting in.

I think you need to shift your mindset a little, and staring thinking about options. $25,000 is a lot of money and it buys a lot of support. If you went to an inexpensive place you might even be able stretch the budget to cover both an intensive pre-MSc programme (which would focus on your English and quantitative skills) and an MSc.

You'll need to take the time to research these programmes, because I'm an expert in MBAs, and you need a programme aimed at recent undergraduates, but there are pre-MBA programmes like :
http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=1928&p=20439 and there will be many programmes like this aimed at pre-MSc students. I suggest you take a few hours to find ones that fit your needs and budget,

I have taken a few minutes and found a few here which mostly look for a 5.5 IELTS score:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/foundation/businessandenglish/
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/English-Language-courses/Pre-Masters/
http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/cele/preliminaryyearprogramme/preliminaryyearcourses/pgpremasterprogramme.aspx
http://www.worc.ac.uk/journey/international-pre-masters-diploma.html
http://www.dcu.ie/prospective/deginfo.php?
classname=IFP&originating_school=61
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/pathway/premasters/
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/english-language/eap/

Some of these programmes even lead to a qualification in their own right, like the St. Andrews Diploma in Business and English, and might be enough by themselves to help your employment prospects.

I am not sure that any of these are right for you, but I know that if you research you will find the right way forward. However, right now, with your degree there are nots of grea jobs available to you which don't involve handling pharmaceuticals - and better English and another qualification will help you more.
quote
crashed
Crashed, this board is about the UK so I suggest that the stuff on Switzerland might be better off on the Europe board. Perhaps just give links to where you took this material, rather than cutting and pasting in.

I think you need to shift your mindset a little, and staring thinking about options. $25,000 is a lot of money and it buys a lot of support. If you went to an inexpensive place you might even be able stretch the budget to cover both an intensive pre-MSc programme (which would focus on your English and quantitative skills) and an MSc.

You'll need to take the time to research these programmes, because I'm an expert in MBAs, and you need a programme aimed at recent undergraduates, but there are pre-MBA programmes like :
http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=1928&p=20439 and there will be many programmes like this aimed at pre-MSc students. I suggest you take a few hours to find ones that fit your needs and budget,

I have taken a few minutes and found a few here which mostly look for a 5.5 IELTS score:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/foundation/businessandenglish/
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/English-Language-courses/Pre-Masters/
http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/cele/preliminaryyearprogramme/preliminaryyearcourses/pgpremasterprogramme.aspx
http://www.worc.ac.uk/journey/international-pre-masters-diploma.html
http://www.dcu.ie/prospective/deginfo.php?
classname=IFP&originating_school=61
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/pathway/premasters/
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/english-language/eap/

Some of these programmes even lead to a qualification in their own right, like the St. Andrews Diploma in Business and English, and might be enough by themselves to help your employment prospects.

I am not sure that any of these are right for you, but I know that if you research you will find the right way forward. However, right now, with your degree there are nots of grea jobs available to you which don't involve handling pharmaceuticals - and better English and another qualification will help you more.


ok sir , i shall search and i realise my mistake about posting my question in wrong forum. after research i shall come back to you in General forum.
<blockquote>Crashed, this board is about the UK so I suggest that the stuff on Switzerland might be better off on the Europe board. Perhaps just give links to where you took this material, rather than cutting and pasting in.

I think you need to shift your mindset a little, and staring thinking about options. $25,000 is a lot of money and it buys a lot of support. If you went to an inexpensive place you might even be able stretch the budget to cover both an intensive pre-MSc programme (which would focus on your English and quantitative skills) and an MSc.

You'll need to take the time to research these programmes, because I'm an expert in MBAs, and you need a programme aimed at recent undergraduates, but there are pre-MBA programmes like :
http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=1928&p=20439 and there will be many programmes like this aimed at pre-MSc students. I suggest you take a few hours to find ones that fit your needs and budget,

I have taken a few minutes and found a few here which mostly look for a 5.5 IELTS score:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/foundation/businessandenglish/
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/English-Language-courses/Pre-Masters/
http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/cele/preliminaryyearprogramme/preliminaryyearcourses/pgpremasterprogramme.aspx
http://www.worc.ac.uk/journey/international-pre-masters-diploma.html
http://www.dcu.ie/prospective/deginfo.php?
classname=IFP&originating_school=61
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/pathway/premasters/
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/english-language/eap/

Some of these programmes even lead to a qualification in their own right, like the St. Andrews Diploma in Business and English, and might be enough by themselves to help your employment prospects.

I am not sure that any of these are right for you, but I know that if you research you will find the right way forward. However, right now, with your degree there are nots of grea jobs available to you which don't involve handling pharmaceuticals - and better English and another qualification will help you more.</blockquote>

ok sir , i shall search and i realise my mistake about posting my question in wrong forum. after research i shall come back to you in General forum.
quote

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