Low GMAT - Need Advice


Evan12
Hi everyone,

I've taken the GMAT twice, 1st I would like to admit that I didn't study for the first one and just jump right into it thinking how hard can it be. I got a 420 (Q31, V17) - a disaster. Then I studied for a month with the Princeton review 2011 edition. I thought I would do much much better this time and re-take the GMAT, but I got a disappointing 460 (Q31, V22) especially because I studied the whole book this time. I was looking to find MBA programs in Los Angeles area, initially looking at CSUs, but CSU LA ask for 500. My undergrad GPA isn't that great either (2.6), but I do have a letter of recommendation from the president of my undergrad uni. Should I just apply to CSU-LA, if not what schools in LA or nearby area I can realistically apply to?

(I'm also thinking of retaking the GMAT again, anybody have any idea on what guides/books are good?)
Hi everyone,

I've taken the GMAT twice, 1st I would like to admit that I didn't study for the first one and just jump right into it thinking how hard can it be. I got a 420 (Q31, V17) - a disaster. Then I studied for a month with the Princeton review 2011 edition. I thought I would do much much better this time and re-take the GMAT, but I got a disappointing 460 (Q31, V22) especially because I studied the whole book this time. I was looking to find MBA programs in Los Angeles area, initially looking at CSUs, but CSU LA ask for 500. My undergrad GPA isn't that great either (2.6), but I do have a letter of recommendation from the president of my undergrad uni. Should I just apply to CSU-LA, if not what schools in LA or nearby area I can realistically apply to?

(I'm also thinking of retaking the GMAT again, anybody have any idea on what guides/books are good?)
quote
repoman
So, what's your work experience like? If it's solid and managerial, perhaps that could help trump some of the shortcomings of your application, like the GMAT and undergrad GPA. Maybe ring up their admissions or program director and see what they think.

Personally, I would try to retake the GMAT once more, and maybe take a local prep class. I know that is an investment of both time and money, but it's one I made, and I'm happy I did.

Whatever school you apply to, I wouldn't lower your standards too too much. Definitely go for AACSB accredited, which I think is the case with all or most CSUs.
So, what's your work experience like? If it's solid and managerial, perhaps that could help trump some of the shortcomings of your application, like the GMAT and undergrad GPA. Maybe ring up their admissions or program director and see what they think.

Personally, I would try to retake the GMAT once more, and maybe take a local prep class. I know that is an investment of both time and money, but it's one I made, and I'm happy I did.

Whatever school you apply to, I wouldn't lower your standards too too much. Definitely go for AACSB accredited, which I think is the case with all or most CSUs.
quote
Nalin
The designation of a recommender does not matter much. A recommendation coming from a person who knows you well will serve the purpose more.

I believe that you should take GMAT again. I prepared for GMAT using official guide ( get the latest version), and manhattan sentence correction books. I chose to focus more on sentence correction as I needed a lot of improvement there. Manhattan gives you 6 online tests, which are really helpful. Take them seriously. As suggested you can also take local classes. And in between ( bi-weekly or weekly) take the mock test. It really helps.
The designation of a recommender does not matter much. A recommendation coming from a person who knows you well will serve the purpose more.

I believe that you should take GMAT again. I prepared for GMAT using official guide ( get the latest version), and manhattan sentence correction books. I chose to focus more on sentence correction as I needed a lot of improvement there. Manhattan gives you 6 online tests, which are really helpful. Take them seriously. As suggested you can also take local classes. And in between ( bi-weekly or weekly) take the mock test. It really helps.
quote
-Sam-
For an MBA program, your GMAT score would still be the most important parameter. Although schools emphasize that they look at an applicant's overall profile, GMAT would still carry a greater weight over other parameters like work experience, CGPA, recommendation letters etc. You should score at least 600 to be considered seriously.

Personally, I would recommend taking GMAT again. Follow a systematic study plan and try taking a lot of full length tests. People do good at practice tests involving 10-15 questions, but the actual test is a totally different ballgame. But dedication, determination, discipline and systematic study plans do wonders.

Good luck!
For an MBA program, your GMAT score would still be the most important parameter. Although schools emphasize that they look at an applicant's overall profile, GMAT would still carry a greater weight over other parameters like work experience, CGPA, recommendation letters etc. You should score at least 600 to be considered seriously.

Personally, I would recommend taking GMAT again. Follow a systematic study plan and try taking a lot of full length tests. People do good at practice tests involving 10-15 questions, but the actual test is a totally different ballgame. But dedication, determination, discipline and systematic study plans do wonders.

Good luck!

quote
GMATPrepNo...

I'm also thinking of retaking the GMAT again)


If you decide retake the GMAT, don't schedule your test until after you have achieved your target score on at least two occasions. A lot of students show up at the test center without really knowing if they're capable of getting the score they need.

This is unfortunate since there are several resources out there that will give you a good idea of your current abilities.

The official (free) downloadable practice tests (at http://www.mba.com/the-gmat/download-free-test-preparation-software.aspx) can be taken multiple times with only a few repeated questions each time. Also, there are several free practice tests (from the big test prep companies) out there.

So, when you do go to the test center, you will have extra confidence knowing that you've already achieved your target score.

Cheers,
Brent - GMAT Prep Now
<blockquote>
I'm also thinking of retaking the GMAT again)</blockquote>

If you decide retake the GMAT, don't schedule your test until after you have achieved your target score on at least two occasions. A lot of students show up at the test center without really knowing if they're capable of getting the score they need.

This is unfortunate since there are several resources out there that will give you a good idea of your current abilities.

The official (free) downloadable practice tests (at http://www.mba.com/the-gmat/download-free-test-preparation-software.aspx) can be taken multiple times with only a few repeated questions each time. Also, there are several free practice tests (from the big test prep companies) out there.

So, when you do go to the test center, you will have extra confidence knowing that you've already achieved your target score.

Cheers,
Brent - GMAT Prep Now
quote

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