seeking advice


I need some help deciding if an MBA would be right for me, and where to get it. I'm 36, have a BA in history and have been working since i was 16. my grades were never spectacular, graduated from college with about a 2.8 gpa, and never did good in math classes. however, in my working experience, I've been in charge of $100k budgets, and while I may not do things the convential way, it's worked out before. Here in Colorado Springs, it looks like my 2 best choices might be UCCS or Phoenix University. Does anyone have any ideas to help me research my options or any other helpful tips? Any and all help would be much appreciated. thank you all

I need some help deciding if an MBA would be right for me, and where to get it. I'm 36, have a BA in history and have been working since i was 16. my grades were never spectacular, graduated from college with about a 2.8 gpa, and never did good in math classes. however, in my working experience, I've been in charge of $100k budgets, and while I may not do things the convential way, it's worked out before. Here in Colorado Springs, it looks like my 2 best choices might be UCCS or Phoenix University. Does anyone have any ideas to help me research my options or any other helpful tips? Any and all help would be much appreciated. thank you all
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Mesix

If you are planning to stay in the local community and don't want to travel for school, then UCCS is probably your best bet. I have heard a lot of good things about their edication standards (form engineering graduates, but still feedback), and they are highly regarded in the local community. My impression with the University of Phoenix is that a lot of employers will see it as an online degree and discount it. Unfortunately you cannot change people's preception.

If you are planning to move after getting your MBA then I would suggest going to a more reputable MBA program than UCCS. While potential emploers outside Colorado may not have a bad impression of the UCCS brand, it is also not likely to set you apart from other candidates. With an MBA, you are trying to set yourself apart, so why not do it with a name brand program?

Even if you want to stay in Colorado Springs, a bigger program may still be a good idea if you are willing to travel. There will be plenty of UCCS grads in the local job market, but fewer graduates of Harvard, Duke, or Northwestern (just the first three examples that popped into my head).

My advice would be to find a good executive MBA program that you can travel to for the residency periods. There are many different executive programs that come in flavors to suit different schedules or career goals. Look around and find one that is right for you. if you give us some more details about your profile and ambitions, we may be able to point you in the right direction.

If you are planning to stay in the local community and don't want to travel for school, then UCCS is probably your best bet. I have heard a lot of good things about their edication standards (form engineering graduates, but still feedback), and they are highly regarded in the local community. My impression with the University of Phoenix is that a lot of employers will see it as an online degree and discount it. Unfortunately you cannot change people's preception.

If you are planning to move after getting your MBA then I would suggest going to a more reputable MBA program than UCCS. While potential emploers outside Colorado may not have a bad impression of the UCCS brand, it is also not likely to set you apart from other candidates. With an MBA, you are trying to set yourself apart, so why not do it with a name brand program?

Even if you want to stay in Colorado Springs, a bigger program may still be a good idea if you are willing to travel. There will be plenty of UCCS grads in the local job market, but fewer graduates of Harvard, Duke, or Northwestern (just the first three examples that popped into my head).

My advice would be to find a good executive MBA program that you can travel to for the residency periods. There are many different executive programs that come in flavors to suit different schedules or career goals. Look around and find one that is right for you. if you give us some more details about your profile and ambitions, we may be able to point you in the right direction.
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Thanks for that info, glad to hear that my initial impressions of the 2 schools is about right. I can't afford to travel for school as i'm already in debt, and the student loan will be more salt in that wound. I've held management positions before, but not in what many would consider traditional management positions. I spent 5 years as an undergrad as assistant equipment manager for the hockey team, then 6 of the next 7 as a head equipment manager for division I college and minor league hockey teams. I've been in charge of large budgets, inventory, and scheduling. Right now, I'm just in the very early stages of considering this, but I'm thinking either management in retail or corporate retail, marketing has always appealed to me, maybe even communications of some sort. I'm really not set on a plan of action, just really need some sort of guidance on where to look so i can get focused on what I really want. All i know right now is that I want something better, and this could be the key. While I would love to go to one of the big name schools, it's not in the budget. As far as travel after graduation, I'll go anywhere for the right opportunity, I'm definately not tied to this community, I just can't afford to leave here for the schooling right now. One other big question, how important is the GMAT these days? Will my work experience be able to waive that requirement?

Thanks for that info, glad to hear that my initial impressions of the 2 schools is about right. I can't afford to travel for school as i'm already in debt, and the student loan will be more salt in that wound. I've held management positions before, but not in what many would consider traditional management positions. I spent 5 years as an undergrad as assistant equipment manager for the hockey team, then 6 of the next 7 as a head equipment manager for division I college and minor league hockey teams. I've been in charge of large budgets, inventory, and scheduling. Right now, I'm just in the very early stages of considering this, but I'm thinking either management in retail or corporate retail, marketing has always appealed to me, maybe even communications of some sort. I'm really not set on a plan of action, just really need some sort of guidance on where to look so i can get focused on what I really want. All i know right now is that I want something better, and this could be the key. While I would love to go to one of the big name schools, it's not in the budget. As far as travel after graduation, I'll go anywhere for the right opportunity, I'm definately not tied to this community, I just can't afford to leave here for the schooling right now. One other big question, how important is the GMAT these days? Will my work experience be able to waive that requirement?
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Mesix

I think the GMAT requirement is up to the admissions folks at each university. Even business schools that "require" the GMAT have been known to waive it in some cases. I never took a GMAT, and I am half way through my MBA. I had 15 years of work experience and another Master's program with a 4.0 average on my side when I applied. I am also going to a foreign business school where they are keen to attract American students.

If the finances are what is stopping you from reaching for a top program, look into scholarships or corporate sponsorship. I am paying for most of my MBA out of pocket, but I am finding that there were plenty of scholarships out there if I had looked for them IN ADVANCE.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

I think the GMAT requirement is up to the admissions folks at each university. Even business schools that "require" the GMAT have been known to waive it in some cases. I never took a GMAT, and I am half way through my MBA. I had 15 years of work experience and another Master's program with a 4.0 average on my side when I applied. I am also going to a foreign business school where they are keen to attract American students.

If the finances are what is stopping you from reaching for a top program, look into scholarships or corporate sponsorship. I am paying for most of my MBA out of pocket, but I am finding that there were plenty of scholarships out there if I had looked for them IN ADVANCE.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
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ralph

I think the GMAT requirement is up to the admissions folks at each university. Even business schools that "require" the GMAT have been known to waive it in some cases. I never took a GMAT, and I am half way through my MBA. I had 15 years of work experience and another Master's program with a 4.0 average on my side when I applied. I am also going to a foreign business school where they are keen to attract American students.


This is a good point. Many programs (especially EMBAs) that require a lot of experience don't even care about your GMAT score. And more generally, non-U.S. schools are less likely to ask for it, and are often willing to waive it if you've got, like Mesix, 15 years of work experience. In these cases, the schools are more willing to trust that you have the aptitude to go through an intense, master's-level study course.

The person who will probably most likely need a GMAT is this: somebody who has two years (or less) experience, and is applying for a U.S. university.

<blockquote>I think the GMAT requirement is up to the admissions folks at each university. Even business schools that "require" the GMAT have been known to waive it in some cases. I never took a GMAT, and I am half way through my MBA. I had 15 years of work experience and another Master's program with a 4.0 average on my side when I applied. I am also going to a foreign business school where they are keen to attract American students.</blockquote>

This is a good point. Many programs (especially EMBAs) that require a lot of experience don't even care about your GMAT score. And more generally, non-U.S. schools are less likely to ask for it, and are often willing to waive it if you've got, like Mesix, 15 years of work experience. In these cases, the schools are more willing to trust that you have the aptitude to go through an intense, master's-level study course.

The person who will probably most likely need a GMAT is this: somebody who has two years (or less) experience, and is applying for a U.S. university.
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