MBA IN FRANCE


Is B2 level proficiency enough to study MBA in France ( Course in English)..?
Is B2 level proficiency enough to study MBA in France ( Course in English)..?
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Duncan
I don't think so, but maybe an unaccredited state uni?
I don't think so, but maybe an unaccredited state uni?
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No i was wondering about the part-time jobs and job after the course. Planing to do the course in English. Will the employer be okie if i have b2,c1 level proficiency
No i was wondering about the part-time jobs and job after the course. Planing to do the course in English. Will the employer be okie if i have b2,c1 level proficiency
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Duncan
In French, or in English? B2 French is okay for work in a coffee shop.
In French, or in English? B2 French is okay for work in a coffee shop.
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I will be learning French from india (my place) upto C1 level for a year . Then planning to do course in France. The course i will be learning will be in English. Im planning work there. I just want to know weather that's a good option if im planning to study in France ( course in English) and work there after
I will be learning French from india (my place) upto C1 level for a year . Then planning to do course in France. The course i will be learning will be in English. Im planning work there. I just want to know weather that's a good option if im planning to study in France ( course in English) and work there after
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mcgr
My experience (which is limited) is that top notch language skills are more important in France than pretty much any other place for employment purposes. We were there a few years back with an Australian friend who had lived in Paris for a couple of years, and spoke French at what seemed like a very fluent level to my non-native ear. Even with that, she frequently would have problems with workers in cafes who seemed to have trouble understanding her. As a tourist who can only speak a handful of words in other languages, and has traveled to a dozen countries, France was the only place where I had serious trouble communicating (and I took 3 years of French, so I have at least some vocabulary that I could recall).

For more information it would be good to read Duncan's thread.

https://find-mba.com/board/europe/do-you-need-to-speak-the-local-language-29546

[Edited by mcgr on Jul 19, 2017]

My experience (which is limited) is that top notch language skills are more important in France than pretty much any other place for employment purposes. We were there a few years back with an Australian friend who had lived in Paris for a couple of years, and spoke French at what seemed like a very fluent level to my non-native ear. Even with that, she frequently would have problems with workers in cafes who seemed to have trouble understanding her. As a tourist who can only speak a handful of words in other languages, and has traveled to a dozen countries, France was the only place where I had serious trouble communicating (and I took 3 years of French, so I have at least some vocabulary that I could recall).

For more information it would be good to read Duncan's thread.

https://find-mba.com/board/europe/do-you-need-to-speak-the-local-language-29546
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Duncan
That is why it is important to study in French rather than in English if you want to work in France.
That is why it is important to study in French rather than in English if you want to work in France.
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Razors Edg...
We were there a few years back with an Australian friend who had lived in Paris for a couple of years, and spoke French at what seemed like a very fluent level to my non-native ear. Even with that, she frequently would have problems with workers in cafes who seemed to have trouble understanding her.

Parisians can be notoriously dense when it come to language. Even if they know what you're saying - or if they can switch to English - they can still make it difficult. In other parts of the country, outside of Paris, people can be much more open and friendly.

That's not to say that you can get by professionally in the country without French. I would think that for 90% of people who want to work there, fluent French is absolutely essential.
[quote] We were there a few years back with an Australian friend who had lived in Paris for a couple of years, and spoke French at what seemed like a very fluent level to my non-native ear. Even with that, she frequently would have problems with workers in cafes who seemed to have trouble understanding her.
[/quote]
Parisians can be notoriously dense when it come to language. Even if they know what you're saying - or if they can switch to English - they can still make it difficult. In other parts of the country, outside of Paris, people can be much more open and friendly.

That's not to say that you can get by professionally in the country without French. I would think that for 90% of people who want to work there, fluent French is absolutely essential.
quote
mcgr
Parisians can be notoriously dense when it come to language. Even if they know what you're saying - or if they can switch to English - they can still make it difficult. In other parts of the country, outside of Paris, people can be much more open and friendly.


This was my feeling, although it is hard to judge how much my Parisian stereotypes were coloring my perceptions. I do know that on V.E. Day I chased down a couple of youngish 20-something girls to try and figure out where they had bought the groceries they were carting home, since we'd had a lot of difficulty finding any kind of shop open to buy even a bottle of wine and some bread and cheese. They were of an age and location where I suspected they knew at least a little bit of English, but they feigned ignorance at both my broken French and English, and ran away. Not that I entirely blame them, some random American guy chasing them down the street yelling fromage? Vino? Biere? I'd probably want to get away from that as soon as possible also. But my basic experience in Paris was that people were a lot less willing to work with you to try for mutual understanding than they were in just about anywhere else I've traveled.
[quote]Parisians can be notoriously dense when it come to language. Even if they know what you're saying - or if they can switch to English - they can still make it difficult. In other parts of the country, outside of Paris, people can be much more open and friendly.[/quote]

This was my feeling, although it is hard to judge how much my Parisian stereotypes were coloring my perceptions. I do know that on V.E. Day I chased down a couple of youngish 20-something girls to try and figure out where they had bought the groceries they were carting home, since we'd had a lot of difficulty finding any kind of shop open to buy even a bottle of wine and some bread and cheese. They were of an age and location where I suspected they knew at least a little bit of English, but they feigned ignorance at both my broken French and English, and ran away. Not that I entirely blame them, some random American guy chasing them down the street yelling fromage? Vino? Biere? I'd probably want to get away from that as soon as possible also. But my basic experience in Paris was that people were a lot less willing to work with you to try for mutual understanding than they were in just about anywhere else I've traveled.
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