WHU or Mannheim Part-time MBA


JL85

Hi everyone,


I would like to hear your opinions about the two (part-time) MBAs. I was admitted to both schools, and I have now to decide which one is the best fit for me.


The schools are both well ranked (WHU has a higher rank in FT but much lower in the Economist and QS if I am not mistaken). The MBA programs have similar content, but a pretty different structure (full week every other month Mannheim and 2 weekend days every other week WHU).


They both seem to have a fair amount of international students (around 50% Mannheim and around 40% WHU). The Alumni network seems to be well spread in different industries, even though WHU seems to have a bit of a higher variety of industries (especially Tech industries, and multinationals which I am mainly interested in), but Mannheim has a good alumni network in my current company.


Overall Mannheim seems to be a more established institution and a better-ranked one (besides the financial times ranking), but WHU has interesting international modules (Columbia Business school, plus China and India) which would be also an interesting plus on the CV, especially in terms of international experience.

Both schools have pretty bad career services especially for part-time students, as per alumni feedback, so from this point of view they're equally bad :D :D

The fee would be 3k more at WHU, which after-tax would make it not even 2k, so that can't be the decision-maker either. So long story short, I am not sure which would be the best option.


Any experiences with these 2 MBAs and any opinion on this?

[Edited by JL85 on Jun 08, 2021]

Hi everyone,<br><br>
I would like to hear your opinions about the two (part-time) MBAs. I was admitted to both schools, and I have now to decide which one is the best fit for me.<br><br>
The schools are both well ranked (WHU has a higher rank in FT but much lower in the Economist and QS if I am not mistaken). The MBA programs have similar content, but a pretty different structure (full week every other month Mannheim and 2 weekend days every other week WHU).<br><br>
They both seem to have a fair amount of international students (around 50% Mannheim and around 40% WHU). The Alumni network seems to be well spread in different industries, even though WHU seems to have a bit of a higher variety of industries (especially Tech industries, and multinationals which I am mainly interested in), but Mannheim has a good alumni network in my current company.<br><br>
Overall Mannheim seems to be a more established institution and a better-ranked one (besides the financial times ranking), but WHU has interesting international modules (Columbia Business school, plus China and India) which would be also an interesting plus on the CV, especially in terms of international experience.<br><br>Both schools have pretty bad career services especially for part-time students, as per alumni feedback, so from this point of view they're equally bad :D :D<br><br>The fee would be 3k more at WHU, which after-tax would make it not even 2k, so that can't be the decision-maker either. So long story short, I am not sure which would be the best option.<br><br>
Any experiences with these 2 MBAs and any opinion on this?
quote
Duncan

Because you don't say much about your goals, it's hard to know which is the better fit.

Because you don't say much about your goals, it's hard to know which is the better fit.
quote
JL85

Because you don't say much about your goals, it's hard to know which is the better fit.

I was thinking maybe someone has to share experiences about the 2 schools.
my goal is to gather general management knowledge and get into a product management position ideally in a multinational company. 
But I see an MBA as a chance to change career path as well, if I realize there’s something  better out there for me which I didn’t consider before :

So it was really more a question about the 2 schools and programs quality.

Thanks, 

[quote]Because you don't say much about your goals, it's hard to know which is the better fit. [/quote]<br>I was thinking maybe someone has to share experiences about the 2 schools.<br>my goal is to gather general management knowledge and get into a product management position ideally in a multinational company.&nbsp;<br>But I see an MBA as a chance to change career path as well, if I realize there’s something &nbsp;better out there for me which I didn’t consider before :<br><br>So it was really more a question about the 2 schools and programs quality.<br><br>Thanks,&nbsp;
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Duncan

Are you looking at the Mannheim-ESSEC and WHU-Kellogg programmes? I think you won't find many alumni here, sadly. 

Are you looking at the Mannheim-ESSEC and WHU-Kellogg programmes? I think you won't find many alumni here, sadly.&nbsp;
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JL85

Are you looking at the Mannheim-ESSEC and WHU-Kellogg programmes? I think you won't find many alumni here, sadly. 


No, for both the part-time MBA

[quote]Are you looking at the Mannheim-ESSEC and WHU-Kellogg programmes? I think you won't find many alumni here, sadly.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>No, for both the part-time MBA
quote
Duncan

Very similar. Mannheim's cohort slightly older, more international and more female than WHU. WHU seems to have much more of a focus on personal growth and leadership approach, while Mannheim focusses on building teamwork skills. 

Very similar. Mannheim's cohort slightly older, more international and more female than WHU. WHU seems to have much more of a focus on personal growth and leadership approach, while Mannheim focusses on building teamwork skills.&nbsp;
quote
JL85

Very similar. Mannheim's cohort slightly older, more international and more female than WHU. WHU seems to have much more of a focus on personal growth and leadership approach, while Mannheim focusses on building teamwork skills. 


so being a slightly older, international female Mannheim might be a better option. One thing is very tempting at WHU is the exchange with Columbia Business School and also an exchange in China, while Mannheim has only one week in a less renowned school. But in terms of programs they seem to be similar, even though besides FT Mannheim is highly ranked than WHU

[quote]Very similar. Mannheim's cohort slightly older, more international and more female than WHU. WHU seems to have much more of a focus on personal growth and leadership approach, while Mannheim focusses on building teamwork skills.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>so being a slightly older, international female Mannheim might be a better option. One thing is very tempting at WHU is the exchange with Columbia Business School and also an exchange in China, while Mannheim has only one week in a less renowned school. But in terms of programs they seem to be similar, even though besides FT Mannheim is highly ranked than WHU
quote
Duncan

I would pick WHU: much more effective timing;  more personal growth; and the international partners are very good. 

I would pick WHU: much more effective timing;&nbsp; more personal growth; and the international partners are very good.&nbsp;
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JL85

I would pick WHU: much more effective timing;  more personal growth; and the international partners are very good. 

But in some rankings it is even like C school and not B. The timing on the contrary seems better at Mannheim. Whu some months is almost every weekend. Which is not good to prepare and work on stuff

[quote]I would pick WHU: much more effective timing;&nbsp; more personal growth; and the international partners are very good.&nbsp; [/quote]<br>But in some rankings it is even like C school and not B. The timing on the contrary seems better at Mannheim. Whu some months is almost every weekend. Which is not good to prepare and work on stuff
quote
Duncan

Yes, if you are viewing timing in terms of being work and travel friendly, then Mannheim is more convenient. However for learning more, and more regular, meetings is better. 

WHU has been the leading Germany business school for almost all of the last 40 years. Mannheim has a younger MBA, but the famous business school at Mannheim is the faculty of BWL https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/ rather than the English-language business school which span out from it in 2005. 

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 10, 2021]

Yes, if you are viewing timing in terms of being work and travel friendly, then Mannheim is more convenient. However for learning more, and more regular, meetings is better.&nbsp;<br><br>WHU has been the leading Germany business school for almost all of the last 40 years. Mannheim has a younger MBA, but the famous business school at Mannheim is the faculty of BWL https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/ rather than the English-language business school which span out from it in 2005.&nbsp;
quote
JL85

Yes, if you are viewing timing in terms of being work and travel friendly, then Mannheim is more convenient. However for learning more, and more regular, meetings is better. 

WHU has been the leading Germany business school for almost all of the last 40 years. Mannheim has a younger MBA, but the famous business school at Mannheim is the faculty of BWL https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/ rather than the English-language business school which span out from it in 2005. 


But has lower rankings then (besides FT). Also, one of the post i was asking about mbas last weeks you were saying WHU MBA is very young (even younger than Frankfurt) and Mannheim is the most established one compare to the 3 schools. So now I am a bit confused about WHU being an old institution. 

[quote]Yes, if you are viewing timing in terms of being work and travel friendly, then Mannheim is more convenient. However for learning more, and more regular, meetings is better.&nbsp;<br><br>WHU has been the leading Germany business school for almost all of the last 40 years. Mannheim has a younger MBA, but the famous business school at Mannheim is the faculty of BWL https://www.bwl.uni-mannheim.de/ rather than the English-language business school which span out from it in 2005.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>But has lower rankings then (besides FT). Also, one of the post i was asking about mbas last weeks you were saying WHU MBA is very young (even younger than Frankfurt) and Mannheim is the most established one compare to the 3 schools. So now I am a bit confused about WHU being an old institution.&nbsp;
quote
Duncan

The WHU MBA is much older than the Frankfurt and Mannheim MBAs (but, indeed, every German MBA is relatively young: none has been around as long as the oldest UK/French/Spanish etc MBAs). But, by German standards, WHU is much older than MBS. The Frankfurt school's roots, as the Bankakademie, are older than WHUs, but as a degree-awarding school WHU is older than both the Hochschule für Bankwirtschaft (the forerunner of the Frankfurt school) and Mannheim Business School. Mannheim, as a university, certainly has much wider recognition in the general public and Mannheim BWL has some of Germany's highest admissions standards because it is essentially free. 

At the end of the day, however, you need to compare these as part-time MBAs, not abstractly as brands. Which of them best addresses the gap in capacities and resources you are facing? 

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 10, 2021]

The WHU MBA is much older than the Frankfurt and Mannheim MBAs (but, indeed, every German MBA is relatively young: none has been around as long as the oldest UK/French/Spanish etc MBAs). But, by German standards, WHU is much older than MBS. The Frankfurt school's roots, as the Bankakademie, are older than WHUs, but as a degree-awarding school WHU is older than both the Hochschule für Bankwirtschaft (the forerunner of the Frankfurt school) and Mannheim Business School. Mannheim, as a university, certainly has much wider recognition in the general public and Mannheim BWL has some of Germany's highest admissions standards because it is essentially free.&nbsp;<br><br>At the end of the day, however, you need to compare these as part-time MBAs, not abstractly as brands. Which of them best addresses the gap in capacities and resources you are facing?&nbsp;
quote
JL85

The WHU MBA is much older than the Frankfurt and Mannheim MBAs (but, indeed, every German MBA is relatively young: none has been around as long as the oldest UK/French/Spanish etc MBAs). But, by German standards, WHU is much older than MBS. The Frankfurt school's roots, as the Bankakademie, are older than WHUs, but as a degree-awarding school WHU is older than both the Hochschule für Bankwirtschaft (the forerunner of the Frankfurt school) and Mannheim Business School. Mannheim, as a university, certainly has much wider recognition in the general public and Mannheim BWL has some of Germany's highest admissions standards because it is essentially free. 

At the end of the day, however, you need to compare these as part-time MBAs, not abstractly as brands. Which of them best addresses the gap in capacities and resources you are facing? 


good question. They seem too similar to find a major point of advantage

[quote]The WHU MBA is much older than the Frankfurt and Mannheim MBAs (but, indeed, every German MBA is relatively young: none has been around as long as the oldest UK/French/Spanish etc MBAs). But, by German standards, WHU is much older than MBS. The Frankfurt school's roots, as the Bankakademie, are older than WHUs, but as a degree-awarding school WHU is older than both the Hochschule für Bankwirtschaft (the forerunner of the Frankfurt school) and Mannheim Business School. Mannheim, as a university, certainly has much wider recognition in the general public and Mannheim BWL has some of Germany's highest admissions standards because it is essentially free.&nbsp;<br><br>At the end of the day, however, you need to compare these as part-time MBAs, not abstractly as brands. Which of them best addresses the gap in capacities and resources you are facing?&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>good question. They seem too similar to find a major point of advantage
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Duncan

The difference is really the personal versus team focus: For people who are perhaps individual contributors and need more soft skills training, or the people with soft skills who need to develop a personal- and organisational-leadership capacity. 

The difference is really the personal versus team focus: For people who are perhaps individual contributors and need more soft skills training, or the people with soft skills who need to develop a personal- and organisational-leadership capacity.&nbsp;
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JL85

The difference is really the personal versus team focus: For people who are perhaps individual contributors and need more soft skills training, or the people with soft skills who need to develop a personal- and organisational-leadership capacity. 


is the WHU MBA the right one? Generally I don’t think soft skills have to be trained in a educational/university program. It is something should naturally come with experience imo. But maybe that is already a good answer to what is the right choice for me ;-)

[quote]The difference is really the personal versus team focus: For people who are perhaps individual contributors and need more soft skills training, or the people with soft skills who need to develop a personal- and organisational-leadership capacity.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>is the WHU MBA the right one? Generally I don’t think soft skills have to be trained in a educational/university program. It is something should naturally come with experience imo. But maybe that is already a good answer to what is the right choice for me ;-)
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Duncan

No, I must sadly say that my experience as an MBA interviewer and admissions coach is that some people have narrow functional roles that mean their opportunities for developing soft skills can be very limited. In particular, organisations with high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization can produce talented managers with modest soft skills and even limited supervisory experience. 

There are very few things that can be learned only through a masters degree; however, a degree provides a safe and structured way to get people out of their comfort zone without making them panic.  

No, I must sadly say that my experience as an MBA interviewer and admissions coach is that some people have narrow functional roles that mean their opportunities for developing soft skills can be very limited. In particular, organisations with high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization can produce talented managers with modest soft skills and even limited supervisory experience.&nbsp;<br><br>There are very few things that can be learned only through a masters degree; however, a degree provides a safe and structured way to get people out of their comfort zone without making them panic.&nbsp;&nbsp;
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Duncan

And if you think of those factors -- high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization -- that is much of the Mittelstand, and of stable family business all around western Europe. 

And if you think of those factors -- high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization -- that is much of the Mittelstand, and of stable family business all around western Europe.&nbsp;
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JL85

And if you think of those factors -- high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization -- that is much of the Mittelstand, and of stable family business all around western Europe. 
 
on this I absolutely agree! But those family businesses most likely are not hiring MBA grads as far as I know

[quote]And if you think of those factors -- high power distance, high barriers to entry and deep technical specialization -- that is much of the Mittelstand, and of stable family business all around western Europe.&nbsp; [/quote]&nbsp;<br>on this I absolutely agree! But those family businesses most likely are not hiring MBA grads as far as I know
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Duncan

ALDI, BMW, Bosch, Lidl, and Volkswagen are family businesses which seem to hire a lot of MBAs. 

ALDI, BMW, Bosch, Lidl,&nbsp;and Volkswagen are family businesses which seem to hire a lot of MBAs.&nbsp;
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JL85

ALDI, BMW, Bosch, Lidl, and Volkswagen are family businesses which seem to hire a lot of MBAs. 

ahhhh if those are family businesses for you, then ok ????????

[quote]ALDI, BMW, Bosch, Lidl,&nbsp;and Volkswagen are family businesses which seem to hire a lot of MBAs.&nbsp; [/quote]<br>ahhhh if those are family businesses for you, then ok ????????
quote

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