Which MBA NUCB ( Japan) or ABS ( Netherland)


sinbaddang
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quote
Duncan
Other things being equal, I think NUCB is the better school. If you have more connections to Japan, then that also makes sense. But these are two very different schools. Why have you applied to them? What are your career goals?
Other things being equal, I think NUCB is the better school. If you have more connections to Japan, then that also makes sense. But these are two very different schools. Why have you applied to them? What are your career goals?
quote
sinbaddang
Other things being equal, I think NUCB is the better school. If you have more connections to Japan, then that also makes sense. But these are two very different schools. Why have you applied to them? What are your career goals?

Hi Duncan,
Can you tell how different between NUCB and ABS?
<blockquote>Other things being equal, I think NUCB is the better school. If you have more connections to Japan, then that also makes sense. But these are two very different schools. Why have you applied to them? What are your career goals?
</blockquote>
Hi Duncan,
Can you tell how different between NUCB and ABS?
quote
Duncan
Well, NUCB has the most important accreditation, from AACSB, and heavily uses the case method, both in teaching and as one of the world's major producers of cases. It's strongly connected to Japanese industry and the campus has a corporate feel. NUCB is clearly one of the top schools in the region. Japanese classes run through both semesters.

ABS is a small and rather weak business school. It doesn't have a similar standing to NUCB. Amsterdam's a small, touristic and peaceful city whose glory days are centuries behind it. Career outcomes are not so strong (http://abs.uva.nl/programmes/content3/career-perspectives/career-perspectives.html), with a 20% pay increase -- much smaller than the 100% increase in the top 100 schools. Dutch courses are not part of the programme.

I think both schools have strong curricula (of course, since they both follow the AMBA model, they are rather similar). The cohort and the learning environment will be different.
Well, NUCB has the most important accreditation, from AACSB, and heavily uses the case method, both in teaching and as one of the world's major producers of cases. It's strongly connected to Japanese industry and the campus has a corporate feel. NUCB is clearly one of the top schools in the region. Japanese classes run through both semesters.

ABS is a small and rather weak business school. It doesn't have a similar standing to NUCB. Amsterdam's a small, touristic and peaceful city whose glory days are centuries behind it. Career outcomes are not so strong (http://abs.uva.nl/programmes/content3/career-perspectives/career-perspectives.html), with a 20% pay increase -- much smaller than the 100% increase in the top 100 schools. Dutch courses are not part of the programme.

I think both schools have strong curricula (of course, since they both follow the AMBA model, they are rather similar). The cohort and the learning environment will be different.
quote
Why
Hello, I hope you did not take the offer from NUCB. I had the same problems as you while choosing schools. Luckily I contacted some friends who study and live in Japan, they told me NUCB is the bottom level private business school, Japanese call it Sanryu, which means the third class/level. And since it is a totally private school, they change and set up role without any notification to students. Yes,common rules doesn't apply. For instance, one student from European enrolled at NUCB, and exchanged to another university, when she finished her study and tried to transfer all of her credit back to NUCB to graduate, the staff at NUCB told her that she couldn't transfer all but a part of the aboard credits. So she had to study for another semester. Nobody told her such an important rule, pity her.

This is not the worst case, after more contact with students studying in NUCB, I heard another terrible case. One student enrolled as MBA student in NUCB, but after finished all his MBA study, at the commence ceremony, he found his degree is not MBA but MSc, and NUCB told him because his working experience is not long enough.

About the scholarship, I don't know whether you notice it , NUCB give scholarship if your GMAT is more than 540.
And the average GMAT score in NUCB is 500, for Japanese students, they don't event have to provide GMAT score.

I don't know your GMAT score,if more than 600(I guess it is very easy, I studied less than 2 weeks),there are plenty prestigious business school better than NUCB.

About the job opportunity, hardly could I think that you can find a job without Japanese proficiency. Japanese have the lowest TOEFL score in Asia, even worse than the Laos and Myanmar, if you hope you could find a job just by English, I guess it is just a nice dream like I had. And I notice that several years ago and tried to study Japanese, but I found it is really difficult, even harder than Mandarin!!!.

About the accreditation, I found only 2Univeristies in Japan got it. I used to believe it is critical thing but now totally negate it. I asked my current school and they told me it is just a little time and money. What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school. Unfortunately, I found only a few small and local companies hiring in NUCB. Global companies, such as JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, don't have any recruit events in NUCB.

About the ABS, I don't know it, nothing to comment
Good LUCK
Hello, I hope you did not take the offer from NUCB. I had the same problems as you while choosing schools. Luckily I contacted some friends who study and live in Japan, they told me NUCB is the bottom level private business school, Japanese call it Sanryu, which means the third class/level. And since it is a totally private school, they change and set up role without any notification to students. Yes,common rules doesn't apply. For instance, one student from European enrolled at NUCB, and exchanged to another university, when she finished her study and tried to transfer all of her credit back to NUCB to graduate, the staff at NUCB told her that she couldn't transfer all but a part of the aboard credits. So she had to study for another semester. Nobody told her such an important rule, pity her.

This is not the worst case, after more contact with students studying in NUCB, I heard another terrible case. One student enrolled as MBA student in NUCB, but after finished all his MBA study, at the commence ceremony, he found his degree is not MBA but MSc, and NUCB told him because his working experience is not long enough.

About the scholarship, I don't know whether you notice it , NUCB give scholarship if your GMAT is more than 540.
And the average GMAT score in NUCB is 500, for Japanese students, they don't event have to provide GMAT score.

I don't know your GMAT score,if more than 600(I guess it is very easy, I studied less than 2 weeks),there are plenty prestigious business school better than NUCB.

About the job opportunity, hardly could I think that you can find a job without Japanese proficiency. Japanese have the lowest TOEFL score in Asia, even worse than the Laos and Myanmar, if you hope you could find a job just by English, I guess it is just a nice dream like I had. And I notice that several years ago and tried to study Japanese, but I found it is really difficult, even harder than Mandarin!!!.

About the accreditation, I found only 2Univeristies in Japan got it. I used to believe it is critical thing but now totally negate it. I asked my current school and they told me it is just a little time and money. What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school. Unfortunately, I found only a few small and local companies hiring in NUCB. Global companies, such as JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, don't have any recruit events in NUCB.

About the ABS, I don't know it, nothing to comment
Good LUCK




quote
Razors Edg...
First off, I think your point about transferring credits is a bit misleading - most MBA programs do not like students to transfer credits from other schools, and make it hard. This isn't unique to NUCB.

However, I accept your points about the lower GMAT score, and that for many students with 600+ might find other schools, especially if they are open to where they want to study, and perhaps don't speak (or want to learn) Japanese.

However, I think that for a candidate who is specifically looking to do an MBA in Japan, there are relatively few internationally-accredited options, and NUCB is probably the best of those options.
What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school.

Complete agree. However, the job market in Japan is a bit different from that in other countries - going to a specific school won't automatically land you a specific job. Language is important, as is a grasp of the culture.
First off, I think your point about transferring credits is a bit misleading - most MBA programs do not like students to transfer credits from other schools, and make it hard. This isn't unique to NUCB.

However, I accept your points about the lower GMAT score, and that for many students with 600+ might find other schools, especially if they are open to where they want to study, and perhaps don't speak (or want to learn) Japanese.

However, I think that for a candidate who is specifically looking to do an MBA in Japan, there are relatively few internationally-accredited options, and NUCB is probably the best of those options.
<blockquote>What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school.</blockquote>
Complete agree. However, the job market in Japan is a bit different from that in other countries - going to a specific school won't automatically land you a specific job. Language is important, as is a grasp of the culture.
quote
Why
First off, I think your point about transferring credits is a bit misleading - most MBA programs do not like students to transfer credits from other schools, and make it hard. This isn't unique to NUCB.

However, I accept your points about the lower GMAT score, and that for many students with 600+ might find other schools, especially if they are open to where they want to study, and perhaps don't speak (or want to learn) Japanese.

However, I think that for a candidate who is specifically looking to do an MBA in Japan, there are relatively few internationally-accredited options, and NUCB is probably the best of those options.
What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school.

Complete agree. However, the job market in Japan is a bit different from that in other countries - going to a specific school won't automatically land you a specific job. Language is important, as is a grasp of the culture.



I think you are not following what I meant about the credit transfer instance, which is an example I mentioned to illustrate they are not consistent in the policy they made and implement. I have many friends studying in European business school, most of which encourage students to exchange and have minimum requirement of exchange credits. If it is not the case in this school, at least should inform students what the policies are rather than creating a policy or without any notification before students taking any action. It is definitely school?s responsibility to keep students aware of what is going on. In the credit transfer case, obviously it is not student?s fault but she/he was punished and has to postpone graduation for another semester.

For MBA pursuers, I guess most of them, including myself, must be around age of 30. Suspending current career to achieve a MBA but without placement security is too risky and costly. In my case, choosing which country to study also means choosing this country to extend my career; I can?t image that if I spent 1 or 2 years studying in a foreign country, after graduation then realize it is impossible to find a job with a MBA degree from a low reputation school. If I could not find a job after graduation, what is reason makes me study there? I admit that I love a lot of things about Japan when I traveled in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Kobe. That is also the reason I spent a lot of time to explore school information in Japan.

I don't know whether you heard about the seniority system, which means hierarchical position based on your age and the time you worked for your company. It is impossible to be placed on a manager?s position even if you are a Japanese native speak and graduated from famous school such as Keio or Tokyo University or Hitotsubashi, although these schools(Keio was accredited) don't have internationally-accreditation but really are prestigious schools in Japan. As I said, accreditation means nothing without better placement.

Last but not least, the average salary of MBA holders in Japan is terribly low, especially compare with the return and investment ratio in other countries. This phenomenon must be an important reason that the recognition of MBA is not highly weighted.

All in all, it is absolutely not a good place to pursuing MBA in Japan considering the high investment, low return and no placement security.
<blockquote>First off, I think your point about transferring credits is a bit misleading - most MBA programs do not like students to transfer credits from other schools, and make it hard. This isn't unique to NUCB.

However, I accept your points about the lower GMAT score, and that for many students with 600+ might find other schools, especially if they are open to where they want to study, and perhaps don't speak (or want to learn) Japanese.

However, I think that for a candidate who is specifically looking to do an MBA in Japan, there are relatively few internationally-accredited options, and NUCB is probably the best of those options.
<blockquote>What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school.</blockquote>
Complete agree. However, the job market in Japan is a bit different from that in other countries - going to a specific school won't automatically land you a specific job. Language is important, as is a grasp of the culture.</blockquote>






I think you are not following what I meant about the credit transfer instance, which is an example I mentioned to illustrate they are not consistent in the policy they made and implement. I have many friends studying in European business school, most of which encourage students to exchange and have minimum requirement of exchange credits. If it is not the case in this school, at least should inform students what the policies are rather than creating a policy or without any notification before students taking any action. It is definitely school?s responsibility to keep students aware of what is going on. In the credit transfer case, obviously it is not student?s fault but she/he was punished and has to postpone graduation for another semester.

For MBA pursuers, I guess most of them, including myself, must be around age of 30. Suspending current career to achieve a MBA but without placement security is too risky and costly. In my case, choosing which country to study also means choosing this country to extend my career; I can?t image that if I spent 1 or 2 years studying in a foreign country, after graduation then realize it is impossible to find a job with a MBA degree from a low reputation school. If I could not find a job after graduation, what is reason makes me study there? I admit that I love a lot of things about Japan when I traveled in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Kobe. That is also the reason I spent a lot of time to explore school information in Japan.

I don't know whether you heard about the seniority system, which means hierarchical position based on your age and the time you worked for your company. It is impossible to be placed on a manager?s position even if you are a Japanese native speak and graduated from famous school such as Keio or Tokyo University or Hitotsubashi, although these schools(Keio was accredited) don't have internationally-accreditation but really are prestigious schools in Japan. As I said, accreditation means nothing without better placement.

Last but not least, the average salary of MBA holders in Japan is terribly low, especially compare with the return and investment ratio in other countries. This phenomenon must be an important reason that the recognition of MBA is not highly weighted.

All in all, it is absolutely not a good place to pursuing MBA in Japan considering the high investment, low return and no placement security.
quote
sinbaddang
I am in NUCB campus. There is a lot to say about the school. But basically, I satisfy with the quality of education here. We enormously benefit from small size class where the professors get acquaintance to all students. Most of these guys are PHD from Harvard, and have intensive practical knowledge on what they are offering. We are having big class this year with 55 students from France, Japan, Germany, Portugal, Indonesia... NUCB is more popular among exchange students than regular one.

I have talked to many part time students who had their master at other pretious business school in Japan, and they supposed that NUCB prevail in terms of practical knowledge. I do not think that it's junior as you said. It has more international identity than any other MBA program in Japan, but lacks the long tradition to be well-awared by Japanese

The school has perfect double degree scheme, I can have another degree at France, Germany or Canada. I may take advantage of that. And will keep in mind what you are saying. NUCB is a growing school, and there is a lot to improve.

Career for MBA in Japan is unclear without knowing Japanese. I must agree with you on this. But is it positive to find a job in france, germany or netherland if you do not know their language? obviously not easy, as i heard from my cohort. THe school is doing several things to improve career service for students, but that deems not enough to many of us. A/w, we should learn how to swim rather than be hooked
I am in NUCB campus. There is a lot to say about the school. But basically, I satisfy with the quality of education here. We enormously benefit from small size class where the professors get acquaintance to all students. Most of these guys are PHD from Harvard, and have intensive practical knowledge on what they are offering. We are having big class this year with 55 students from France, Japan, Germany, Portugal, Indonesia... NUCB is more popular among exchange students than regular one.

I have talked to many part time students who had their master at other pretious business school in Japan, and they supposed that NUCB prevail in terms of practical knowledge. I do not think that it's junior as you said. It has more international identity than any other MBA program in Japan, but lacks the long tradition to be well-awared by Japanese

The school has perfect double degree scheme, I can have another degree at France, Germany or Canada. I may take advantage of that. And will keep in mind what you are saying. NUCB is a growing school, and there is a lot to improve.

Career for MBA in Japan is unclear without knowing Japanese. I must agree with you on this. But is it positive to find a job in france, germany or netherland if you do not know their language? obviously not easy, as i heard from my cohort. THe school is doing several things to improve career service for students, but that deems not enough to many of us. A/w, we should learn how to swim rather than be hooked
quote
Duncan
I don't know that much about NUCB, but have a couple of generic points.
- It's not a reasonable criticism of the school that it won't retrospectively accept credits from another school. Almost all schools are very picky about this. If you don't go as part of a previously-agreed study plan or exchange programme, then you can't expect the credits to be accepted.
- NUCB is clearly a serious school: you can see that from its exchange programme partners and the videos on the school are also instructive. But, sadly, the quality of a school depends on much more than that. Japan has dense, almost saturated, elite networks around a small number of schools. It is a slow process to build a brand there and, in the Japanese context, what is surprising about NUCB is the school's success in gaining scale and international accreditation.
- There are some general points in my post Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713 which I don't need to repeat.
I don't know that much about NUCB, but have a couple of generic points.
- It's not a reasonable criticism of the school that it won't retrospectively accept credits from another school. Almost all schools are very picky about this. If you don't go as part of a previously-agreed study plan or exchange programme, then you can't expect the credits to be accepted.
- NUCB is clearly a serious school: you can see that from its exchange programme partners and the videos on the school are also instructive. But, sadly, the quality of a school depends on much more than that. Japan has dense, almost saturated, elite networks around a small number of schools. It is a slow process to build a brand there and, in the Japanese context, what is surprising about NUCB is the school's success in gaining scale and international accreditation.
- There are some general points in my post Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713 which I don't need to repeat.
quote
ralph
Agreed. I think the credit transference complaint is a non-issue - business schools at this level don't have much incentive to accept transfer credits, and not many actually do. Perhaps the poster was confused with the school's policy?

Japan is a tough market for outsiders to crack, especially without fluent language and cultural skills. It's not like going to Singapore or Hong Kong, where many expats get by in the business community with just English. But NUCB is a serious school, and a reasonable choice for international students with certain needs (such as those who want to work in firms that do business with Japanese companies, or those who specifically want to get international experience in Japan.)
Agreed. I think the credit transference complaint is a non-issue - business schools at this level don't have much incentive to accept transfer credits, and not many actually do. Perhaps the poster was confused with the school's policy?

Japan is a tough market for outsiders to crack, especially without fluent language and cultural skills. It's not like going to Singapore or Hong Kong, where many expats get by in the business community with just English. But NUCB is a serious school, and a reasonable choice for international students with certain needs (such as those who want to work in firms that do business with Japanese companies, or those who specifically want to get international experience in Japan.)
quote
Why
Agreed. I think the credit transference complaint is a non-issue - business schools at this level don't have much incentive to accept transfer credits, and not many actually do. Perhaps the poster was confused with the school's policy?

Japan is a tough market for outsiders to crack, especially without fluent language and cultural skills. It's not like going to Singapore or Hong Kong, where many expats get by in the business community with just English. But NUCB is a serious school, and a reasonable choice for international students with certain needs (such as those who want to work in firms that do business with Japanese companies, or those who specifically want to get international experience in Japan.)



Hardly can I agree with you that it is a SERIOUS school. The reasons that gave me this impressions are the followings:

First, not matter a school has a maximum transferable credit policy (the case in NUCB) or a minimum one (many European schools), school should explain its policy to students in advance to avoid inconvenience upon students. Create a policy today and applied it to yesterday?s stuff should definitely be labeled as wanton behavior.

Second, enrolled as a MBA student, but granted a MSc degree when graduate is totally unacceptable by all means.

Third, according to my Japanese friends, there are lot things they won?t tell you until you entered the school. For example, if enrolled as one year MBA(two semesters), but finished all courses with GPA less than 3.0, the school will charge extra semester tuition and issue degree at the end of the third semester. Remember, in the third semester, you don't have to attend school because you finished all courses so that the purpose of this policy seems just to squeeze extra money. This policy is not listed on the promotion flier, however, it is too late when you realize it. It is impossible to get away because you have paid the tuition and enroll fee, which are not refundable.


After all, since sinbaddang is already studying in NUCB, it seems there is meaningless to continue this topic.
<blockquote>Agreed. I think the credit transference complaint is a non-issue - business schools at this level don't have much incentive to accept transfer credits, and not many actually do. Perhaps the poster was confused with the school's policy?

Japan is a tough market for outsiders to crack, especially without fluent language and cultural skills. It's not like going to Singapore or Hong Kong, where many expats get by in the business community with just English. But NUCB is a serious school, and a reasonable choice for international students with certain needs (such as those who want to work in firms that do business with Japanese companies, or those who specifically want to get international experience in Japan.)</blockquote>



Hardly can I agree with you that it is a SERIOUS school. The reasons that gave me this impressions are the followings:

First, not matter a school has a maximum transferable credit policy (the case in NUCB) or a minimum one (many European schools), school should explain its policy to students in advance to avoid inconvenience upon students. Create a policy today and applied it to yesterday?s stuff should definitely be labeled as wanton behavior.

Second, enrolled as a MBA student, but granted a MSc degree when graduate is totally unacceptable by all means.

Third, according to my Japanese friends, there are lot things they won?t tell you until you entered the school. For example, if enrolled as one year MBA(two semesters), but finished all courses with GPA less than 3.0, the school will charge extra semester tuition and issue degree at the end of the third semester. Remember, in the third semester, you don't have to attend school because you finished all courses so that the purpose of this policy seems just to squeeze extra money. This policy is not listed on the promotion flier, however, it is too late when you realize it. It is impossible to get away because you have paid the tuition and enroll fee, which are not refundable.


After all, since sinbaddang is already studying in NUCB, it seems there is meaningless to continue this topic.
quote
Dabble
Hello, I hope you did not take the offer from NUCB. I had the same problems as you while choosing schools. Luckily I contacted some friends who study and live in Japan, they told me NUCB is the bottom level private business school, Japanese call it Sanryu, which means the third class/level. And since it is a totally private school, they change and set up role without any notification to students. Yes,common rules doesn't apply. For instance, one student from European enrolled at NUCB, and exchanged to another university, when she finished her study and tried to transfer all of her credit back to NUCB to graduate, the staff at NUCB told her that she couldn't transfer all but a part of the aboard credits. So she had to study for another semester. Nobody told her such an important rule, pity her.

This is not the worst case, after more contact with students studying in NUCB, I heard another terrible case. One student enrolled as MBA student in NUCB, but after finished all his MBA study, at the commence ceremony, he found his degree is not MBA but MSc, and NUCB told him because his working experience is not long enough.

About the scholarship, I don't know whether you notice it , NUCB give scholarship if your GMAT is more than 540.
And the average GMAT score in NUCB is 500, for Japanese students, they don't event have to provide GMAT score.

I don't know your GMAT score,if more than 600(I guess it is very easy, I studied less than 2 weeks),there are plenty prestigious business school better than NUCB.

About the job opportunity, hardly could I think that you can find a job without Japanese proficiency. Japanese have the lowest TOEFL score in Asia, even worse than the Laos and Myanmar, if you hope you could find a job just by English, I guess it is just a nice dream like I had. And I notice that several years ago and tried to study Japanese, but I found it is really difficult, even harder than Mandarin!!!.

About the accreditation, I found only 2Univeristies in Japan got it. I used to believe it is critical thing but now totally negate it. I asked my current school and they told me it is just a little time and money. What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school. Unfortunately, I found only a few small and local companies hiring in NUCB. Global companies, such as JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, don't have any recruit events in NUCB.

About the ABS, I don't know it, nothing to comment
Good LUCK



I totally agree with what "Why" has mentioned here, as a regular student of NUCB. I have experienced many similar ridiculous things.
Grading system
I was not fairly graded for some courses, so I contacted the administration office for details and breakdown of the grade, basically, they failed me because of class participation. However, I found that some students who has less participation or even barely participated in the class have passed, and me who has above average participation in the class didn’t. So I complaint and request for reassessment of the grade, but no response at all from administration office. I have talked to an administration office staff, he told that once the grade released its final. And basically I can do nothing about it.
Internship
According to the student handbook, student can earn 2 credits for an internship.
I have an internship during the vacation, and I approached NUCB administration office in the second week of my internship for guidance, according to their reply, all I need to do is to submit the application by a specific deadline. However, once I submitted the application, NUCB told that the acceptance of my application needs to be discussed because I did not let them know before the start of the internship. Since then, I received no response at all for more than a month, so I visit the campus in person and ask for an answer. They said my application was rejected because I did not follow relevant guideline which mentioned that students should let administration office know as soon as the internship is confirmed. However, the guideline did not mention that application cannot be accepted otherwise. Also, why NUCB did not let me know when I approached them in the very beginning, instead, they advised me to submit the application, and then rejected my application after the submission. If I have known that earlier, I would have time to apply and find another internship for the coming semester, but they deliberately misleading me and keep me waiting for nothing, and eventually made my internship plan impossible.

Secret quota
A student told that she heard from an administration office staff that there will be 14 students graduate this fall before the start of our 4th semester.
According to my information, there are 14 two-year regular students enrolled two years ago, there are 2 students were extended last semester, there are 2 students applied for early graduation (1 withdrawal), and there are 2 one-year student (14+2+1+2=19), all these students are going to graduate this fall, however there are only 14 quotas, what’s that mean? 14=14-5+5
From logical thinking, it’s not difficult to tell that they would fail some students deliberately to maintain that quota. However, they fail and extend students are not based on students’ actual performance, but other consideration. For example, last year, 2 JICA-sponsor students were extended, JICA called professor and complained about it, so they would not extend JICA-sponsor student this year. Also, they would not fail students who has a strong background (i.e. have big family business, or work for certain organization or institution).
All these explained why I was unfairly graded for some courses, and why they made my internship plan impossible. As a non-JICA-sponsor student without strong background, no wondered, I got extended for another semester.

[Edited by Dabble on Sep 15, 2019]

[quote]Hello, I hope you did not take the offer from NUCB. I had the same problems as you while choosing schools. Luckily I contacted some friends who study and live in Japan, they told me NUCB is the bottom level private business school, Japanese call it Sanryu, which means the third class/level. And since it is a totally private school, they change and set up role without any notification to students. Yes,common rules doesn't apply. For instance, one student from European enrolled at NUCB, and exchanged to another university, when she finished her study and tried to transfer all of her credit back to NUCB to graduate, the staff at NUCB told her that she couldn't transfer all but a part of the aboard credits. So she had to study for another semester. Nobody told her such an important rule, pity her.

This is not the worst case, after more contact with students studying in NUCB, I heard another terrible case. One student enrolled as MBA student in NUCB, but after finished all his MBA study, at the commence ceremony, he found his degree is not MBA but MSc, and NUCB told him because his working experience is not long enough.

About the scholarship, I don't know whether you notice it , NUCB give scholarship if your GMAT is more than 540.
And the average GMAT score in NUCB is 500, for Japanese students, they don't event have to provide GMAT score.

I don't know your GMAT score,if more than 600(I guess it is very easy, I studied less than 2 weeks),there are plenty prestigious business school better than NUCB.

About the job opportunity, hardly could I think that you can find a job without Japanese proficiency. Japanese have the lowest TOEFL score in Asia, even worse than the Laos and Myanmar, if you hope you could find a job just by English, I guess it is just a nice dream like I had. And I notice that several years ago and tried to study Japanese, but I found it is really difficult, even harder than Mandarin!!!.

About the accreditation, I found only 2Univeristies in Japan got it. I used to believe it is critical thing but now totally negate it. I asked my current school and they told me it is just a little time and money. What important is the reputation in the local community. You should check which companies recruit in their school. Unfortunately, I found only a few small and local companies hiring in NUCB. Global companies, such as JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs, don't have any recruit events in NUCB.

About the ABS, I don't know it, nothing to comment
Good LUCK




[/quote]
I totally agree with what "Why" has mentioned here, as a regular student of NUCB. I have experienced many similar ridiculous things.
Grading system
I was not fairly graded for some courses, so I contacted the administration office for details and breakdown of the grade, basically, they failed me because of class participation. However, I found that some students who has less participation or even barely participated in the class have passed, and me who has above average participation in the class didn’t. So I complaint and request for reassessment of the grade, but no response at all from administration office. I have talked to an administration office staff, he told that once the grade released its final. And basically I can do nothing about it.
Internship
According to the student handbook, student can earn 2 credits for an internship.
I have an internship during the vacation, and I approached NUCB administration office in the second week of my internship for guidance, according to their reply, all I need to do is to submit the application by a specific deadline. However, once I submitted the application, NUCB told that the acceptance of my application needs to be discussed because I did not let them know before the start of the internship. Since then, I received no response at all for more than a month, so I visit the campus in person and ask for an answer. They said my application was rejected because I did not follow relevant guideline which mentioned that students should let administration office know as soon as the internship is confirmed. However, the guideline did not mention that application cannot be accepted otherwise. Also, why NUCB did not let me know when I approached them in the very beginning, instead, they advised me to submit the application, and then rejected my application after the submission. If I have known that earlier, I would have time to apply and find another internship for the coming semester, but they deliberately misleading me and keep me waiting for nothing, and eventually made my internship plan impossible.

Secret quota
A student told that she heard from an administration office staff that there will be 14 students graduate this fall before the start of our 4th semester.
According to my information, there are 14 two-year regular students enrolled two years ago, there are 2 students were extended last semester, there are 2 students applied for early graduation (1 withdrawal), and there are 2 one-year student (14+2+1+2=19), all these students are going to graduate this fall, however there are only 14 quotas, what’s that mean? 14=14-5+5
From logical thinking, it’s not difficult to tell that they would fail some students deliberately to maintain that quota. However, they fail and extend students are not based on students’ actual performance, but other consideration. For example, last year, 2 JICA-sponsor students were extended, JICA called professor and complained about it, so they would not extend JICA-sponsor student this year. Also, they would not fail students who has a strong background (i.e. have big family business, or work for certain organization or institution).
All these explained why I was unfairly graded for some courses, and why they made my internship plan impossible. As a non-JICA-sponsor student without strong background, no wondered, I got extended for another semester.
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