TUM MIM IN MUNICH vs EBS vs ALBERTA canada option


i m from India. I really seek you people's guidance to make informed decison. I have good academic backround in chemical engineering and currently 1 yr of experience in Oil/energy sector and confident to get GMAT score above 675 may be 700.
I am looking for TUM MIM program (cos its highly reputed and tution free) but could not get employment and salary details. how is it for international student as currently i dont know german at all but agree I will have to learn it.
I got EBS employment report of mim program which says avarage slary was 62k euro after course and 85% employemnt in 3 months. I beleive TUM MIM will be able to give similar success as ebs or cologne or manheimm or esmt. Am i right, pls correct me if i am wrong. you people know more so kindly reply. My main hurdle is weak financial background so TUM suits me a lot.

if possible can anyone compare TUM MIM program with uni of Alberta, canada MBA program cos that suits my oil/energy background and if prodigy gives me loan for tution of alberta (which it says it can but i doubt) i can afford living expenses easily. Still for me tum mim is beter cos of no tution fee and no loan. Whats your ppl perpective.
ps: I want to work after course in same country where i pursue the course.

[Edited by sudhanshu agarwal on Mar 27, 2017]

i m from India. I really seek you people's guidance to make informed decison. I have good academic backround in chemical engineering and currently 1 yr of experience in Oil/energy sector and confident to get GMAT score above 675 may be 700.
I am looking for TUM MIM program (cos its highly reputed and tution free) but could not get employment and salary details. how is it for international student as currently i dont know german at all but agree I will have to learn it.
I got EBS employment report of mim program which says avarage slary was 62k euro after course and 85% employemnt in 3 months. I beleive TUM MIM will be able to give similar success as ebs or cologne or manheimm or esmt. Am i right, pls correct me if i am wrong. you people know more so kindly reply. My main hurdle is weak financial background so TUM suits me a lot.

if possible can anyone compare TUM MIM program with uni of Alberta, canada MBA program cos that suits my oil/energy background and if prodigy gives me loan for tution of alberta (which it says it can but i doubt) i can afford living expenses easily. Still for me tum mim is beter cos of no tution fee and no loan. Whats your ppl perpective.
ps: I want to work after course in same country where i pursue the course.
quote
Duncan
When are you planning to enter the MIM? If you don't know German now, then there's no chance you will be fluent in it by the time the next intake starts. If you study in English, your German won't improve fast.
When are you planning to enter the MIM? If you don't know German now, then there's no chance you will be fluent in it by the time the next intake starts. If you study in English, your German won't improve fast.
quote
When are you planning to enter the MIM? If you don't know German now, then there's no chance you will be fluent in it by the time the next intake starts. If you study in English, your German won't improve fast.


I am planning for next intake in 2018. I totally agree that language is big hinderance ans will have to work hard on it from now, but apart from it how good is TUM MIM as compared to famous mim programme of ebs/manheimm/esmt etc. Can its international graduates have almost same prospects as these other colleges because language barrier will remain same in all colleges but apart from language if you can through some light.
[quote]When are you planning to enter the MIM? If you don't know German now, then there's no chance you will be fluent in it by the time the next intake starts. If you study in English, your German won't improve fast. [/quote]

I am planning for next intake in 2018. I totally agree that language is big hinderance ans will have to work hard on it from now, but apart from it how good is TUM MIM as compared to famous mim programme of ebs/manheimm/esmt etc. Can its international graduates have almost same prospects as these other colleges because language barrier will remain same in all colleges but apart from language if you can through some light.
quote
Duncan
I think the TUM course has no tuition fee. If that's the case them I don't see how they can be expected to produce the same outcomes. Unlike the other schools, which has a lot of fee paying students, TUM will not have the selectivity or the resources of the better performing schools.
I think the TUM course has no tuition fee. If that's the case them I don't see how they can be expected to produce the same outcomes. Unlike the other schools, which has a lot of fee paying students, TUM will not have the selectivity or the resources of the better performing schools.
quote
I think the TUM course has no tuition fee. If that's the case them I don't see how they can be expected to produce the same outcomes. Unlike the other schools, which has a lot of fee paying students, TUM will not have the selectivity or the resources of the better performing schools.


yes it does not charges tution fee, but tum has no lack of funds for its programs i beleive. the guest talks (this year Bill Gates arrived) and it ciriculum is good. Resources for the course is not a problem for TUM being among the top public university of germany.
[quote]I think the TUM course has no tuition fee. If that's the case them I don't see how they can be expected to produce the same outcomes. Unlike the other schools, which has a lot of fee paying students, TUM will not have the selectivity or the resources of the better performing schools. [/quote]

yes it does not charges tution fee, but tum has no lack of funds for its programs i beleive. the guest talks (this year Bill Gates arrived) and it ciriculum is good. Resources for the course is not a problem for TUM being among the top public university of germany.
quote
Duncan
I think your perception of TUM is mistaken. Given that TUM has no tuition, the facilities are similar to those at other German state universities (I studied at the LMU). Compared to the private German schools (or even the state universities here in the UK, where I now teach), it's going back in time:
- chalk boards not smart boards
- huge classes, not interactive lectures
- professors wheeled in for lectures, rather than being easily accessible via office hours (although I found some professors to be pretty good by email)
- no dedicated careers team for MIM students
- challenging course work with minimal tutorial support.
- general emphasis on exams, with few modules offering continuous feedback on assignments and projects
- over-crowded schools with long timetables: 8am classes and Saturday lectures are not unusual at TUM or many other German state unis.
- limited support for building German-language skills, waitlists for German classes
- little or no university support for finding housing
- Crazy bureacracy
- hideously complicated module selection process, in which students have to often book themselves into modules individually.

TUM is an excellent university because of the great students and staff it recruits and its location in the heart of German technology, but be aware that the state universities in Germany (like France, Spain, Italy etc) recruit more students than they have space for and the drop-out rate is higher because of the relative lack of support. If you are an excellent student, it's an excellent academic option because the quality of the academic staff is normally high. However, you cannot expect the same development of managerial skills or the same support in learning or placement as at a well-funded school.

Given that TUM doesn't have a private endowment to support its English-language classes, I don't understand why you think that it will be able to offer the sort of facilities that the well-funded schools have.

PS Bill Gates was not part of a program of TUM guest speakers, and they don't pay Gates to speak so it's not an illustration of good resources. Gates came to speak on Africa at the Bavarian School of Public Policy (a separate state university which the Bavarian government moved onto the TUM campus at the end of 2014). He thus spoke in a TUM building, but it's a stretch to give any credit for that to TUM.

[Edited by Duncan on Mar 29, 2017]

I think your perception of TUM is mistaken. Given that TUM has no tuition, the facilities are similar to those at other German state universities (I studied at the LMU). Compared to the private German schools (or even the state universities here in the UK, where I now teach), it's going back in time:
- chalk boards not smart boards
- huge classes, not interactive lectures
- professors wheeled in for lectures, rather than being easily accessible via office hours (although I found some professors to be pretty good by email)
- no dedicated careers team for MIM students
- challenging course work with minimal tutorial support.
- general emphasis on exams, with few modules offering continuous feedback on assignments and projects
- over-crowded schools with long timetables: 8am classes and Saturday lectures are not unusual at TUM or many other German state unis.
- limited support for building German-language skills, waitlists for German classes
- little or no university support for finding housing
- Crazy bureacracy
- hideously complicated module selection process, in which students have to often book themselves into modules individually.

TUM is an excellent university because of the great students and staff it recruits and its location in the heart of German technology, but be aware that the state universities in Germany (like France, Spain, Italy etc) recruit more students than they have space for and the drop-out rate is higher because of the relative lack of support. If you are an excellent student, it's an excellent academic option because the quality of the academic staff is normally high. However, you cannot expect the same development of managerial skills or the same support in learning or placement as at a well-funded school.

Given that TUM doesn't have a private endowment to support its English-language classes, I don't understand why you think that it will be able to offer the sort of facilities that the well-funded schools have.

PS Bill Gates was not part of a program of TUM guest speakers, and they don't pay Gates to speak so it's not an illustration of good resources. Gates came to speak on Africa at the Bavarian School of Public Policy (a separate state university which the Bavarian government moved onto the TUM campus at the end of 2014). He thus spoke in a TUM building, but it's a stretch to give any credit for that to TUM.
quote
thanks a lot duncan for your elaborated response. these discussion do help a lot. :)

At end it appears alberta mba as best option.

[Edited by sudhanshu agarwal on Mar 29, 2017]

thanks a lot duncan for your elaborated response. these discussion do help a lot. :)

At end it appears alberta mba as best option.
quote

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