Scandinavian programs


suzywong

Who can help? I am looking for an MBA in Scandinavia. Probabely in Marketing.
thx

Who can help? I am looking for an MBA in Scandinavia. Probabely in Marketing.
thx
quote
york

Högskolan i Gävle (Sweden) has an MBA in marketing. No idea about the quality of the programme though.

Högskolan i Gävle (Sweden) has an MBA in marketing. No idea about the quality of the programme though.
quote
suzywong

Thank you York.
But actually in the meantime I've changed my plan, and I want to go for a more general education. Maybe just a regular MBA, or something like international business.
Which schools can you advise?

Thank you York.
But actually in the meantime I've changed my plan, and I want to go for a more general education. Maybe just a regular MBA, or something like international business.
Which schools can you advise?
quote
eric

Hello,
If you are looking for top schools, that is the ones:
- NHH in Norway
- Copenhagen Business School
- Stockholm School of Economics

Eric

Hello,
If you are looking for top schools, that is the ones:
- NHH in Norway
- Copenhagen Business School
- Stockholm School of Economics

Eric
quote
chili

Hey Eric,
do you have information about other Scandinavian schools as well, besides these three top ones?
I have heard that living costs are quite above the average in Scandianvia,do you have an idea maybe how I could find sponsorhips, grants or something like that?
Thanks,
Pablo

Hey Eric,
do you have information about other Scandinavian schools as well, besides these three top ones?
I have heard that living costs are quite above the average in Scandianvia,do you have an idea maybe how I could find sponsorhips, grants or something like that?
Thanks,
Pablo
quote
suzywong

You better secure financing of your MBA in Scandinavia, otherwise its tough.
As for schools, I've been looking around and for me it sounds like a good idea to stick to these top schools. Don't you agree? I mean, you make the effort to come over to Europe, spend a lot of time and money to do your degree, you better go to a school people in Canada have heard about..

You better secure financing of your MBA in Scandinavia, otherwise its tough.
As for schools, I've been looking around and for me it sounds like a good idea to stick to these top schools. Don't you agree? I mean, you make the effort to come over to Europe, spend a lot of time and money to do your degree, you better go to a school people in Canada have heard about..
quote
bullen

hi there,
I am planning to do part-time International MBA in Scandinavia(especially in Sweden). Could anyone give me some information about these countries.How many hours can I work in a week? and how much money can I earn? Will this money afford my Part-time MBA.And finally which school must I select?(when you compare prices and education which schools are good to become an International MBA student)

hi there,
I am planning to do part-time International MBA in Scandinavia(especially in Sweden). Could anyone give me some information about these countries.How many hours can I work in a week? and how much money can I earn? Will this money afford my Part-time MBA.And finally which school must I select?(when you compare prices and education which schools are good to become an International MBA student)

quote
suzywong

The best school in Sweden is: The Stockholm School of Economics.
They don't offer any part time MBA, but maybe you have the profile for their scholarships? That are the following:
- Candidates from transition and developing economies
- Female candidates
- Candidates with exceptional business experience
- Candidates with very strong academic records or from an underrepresented area that would benefit the program
Look at their site: http://ssemba.sse.edu/text.asp?pageID=47

The best school in Sweden is: The Stockholm School of Economics.
They don't offer any part time MBA, but maybe you have the profile for their scholarships? That are the following:
- Candidates from transition and developing economies
- Female candidates
- Candidates with exceptional business experience
- Candidates with very strong academic records or from an underrepresented area that would benefit the program
Look at their site: http://ssemba.sse.edu/text.asp?pageID=47


quote
bullen

--Thank you for reply...nowadays I am thinking an alternative country such as Ukraine or Russia...But I am still interested in SSE MBA ...Thank you again...I will do my Mba in 2009 coz My school will finish in 2008 that means I have much time to apply for...

--Thank you for reply...nowadays I am thinking an alternative country such as Ukraine or Russia...But I am still interested in SSE MBA ...Thank you again...I will do my Mba in 2009 coz My school will finish in 2008 that means I have much time to apply for...
quote
suzywong

Russia and Ukraine is a very different setting than Sweden. Why are you considering to do an MBA there?
For me personally if i had to chose between Sweden and those two countries, there would not be any doubt. In terms of quality of studies Sweden is definitely another league, or did you find any Ukrainian/RUssian b-school in international rankings? If so, let me know!
Besides, culturally Sweden sounds more ...I don't know how to put it - pleasant, cozy ;) - but that's of course very subjective
Suzy

Russia and Ukraine is a very different setting than Sweden. Why are you considering to do an MBA there?
For me personally if i had to chose between Sweden and those two countries, there would not be any doubt. In terms of quality of studies Sweden is definitely another league, or did you find any Ukrainian/RUssian b-school in international rankings? If so, let me know!
Besides, culturally Sweden sounds more ...I don't know how to put it - pleasant, cozy ;) - but that's of course very subjective
Suzy
quote
paolo

Hi suzywong. What you think about CBS or SSE? What's the best for you? And do you think CBS is comparable to bschool like Insead or IESE?

Thank, Paolo

Hi suzywong. What you think about CBS or SSE? What's the best for you? And do you think CBS is comparable to bschool like Insead or IESE?

Thank, Paolo
quote
chili

Well, CBS is ranked internationally, it's a very good school. But the other two are just top level. Insead is n° 7 and IESE n°16 in the FT Global MBA ranking whereas you'll find CBS only in the European ranking, long time after those 2 above.
Anyways, it's no mistake to study at CBS, same goes for SSE. Good luck!

Well, CBS is ranked internationally, it's a very good school. But the other two are just top level. Insead is n° 7 and IESE n°16 in the FT Global MBA ranking whereas you'll find CBS only in the European ranking, long time after those 2 above.
Anyways, it's no mistake to study at CBS, same goes for SSE. Good luck!
quote
suzywong

I would say that SSE is Sweden's Insead, for CBS in DK it's the same. So if you have a certain reason to chose Denmark or Sweden as location for your MBA studies, thoses 2 schools are the ones. Insead and IESE are still better, but anyways they are among the handful of best schools worldwide.

I would say that SSE is Sweden's Insead, for CBS in DK it's the same. So if you have a certain reason to chose Denmark or Sweden as location for your MBA studies, thoses 2 schools are the ones. Insead and IESE are still better, but anyways they are among the handful of best schools worldwide.
quote
KapiliE

Hey Ladies and Gentlemen,
What about studying in german. I here it's tuition free. Which business schools are there(their sites and/or addresses) Kindly confirm and comment.

How is the international standing of The Hague University of Netherlands, I have been admited there. It is relatively reasonable in cost

Hey Ladies and Gentlemen,
What about studying in german. I here it's tuition free. Which business schools are there(their sites and/or addresses) Kindly confirm and comment.

How is the international standing of The Hague University of Netherlands, I have been admited there. It is relatively reasonable in cost
quote
a_mukerjee

Well not exactly true - doing an MBA in Germany is not tuition free!
You'll find some cheap programs though, compared to other countries. But be aware: that is not the case fo all German MBAs, for a very good program you'll have to spend the same money as elsewhere.

Well not exactly true - doing an MBA in Germany is not tuition free!
You'll find some cheap programs though, compared to other countries. But be aware: that is not the case fo all German MBAs, for a very good program you'll have to spend the same money as elsewhere.
quote
norayue

Hi, any idea about MBA program in Stockholm U, Business school?

Hi, any idea about MBA program in Stockholm U, Business school?
quote
david7685

I find the SSE really interesting, but it seems that it does not appear in any of the rankings I've read lately (The Economist, Forbes, etc) ... in which rankings doest it appear?

I find the SSE really interesting, but it seems that it does not appear in any of the rankings I've read lately (The Economist, Forbes, etc) ... in which rankings doest it appear?
quote
suzywong

Hi David,
I was surprised about your comment because I was convinced that SSE was ranked, thats what I remembered from my researches. So I checked, in fact the SSE MBA does not seem to be in the relevant international rankings, but their EMBA is ranked in the FT ranking. I did not look up other EMBA rankings.
Also SSE is ranked as a school in the FT European B school ranking:
http://rankings.ft.com/european-business-school-rankings

Hope that helps,
Suzy

Hi David,
I was surprised about your comment because I was convinced that SSE was ranked, thats what I remembered from my researches. So I checked, in fact the SSE MBA does not seem to be in the relevant international rankings, but their EMBA is ranked in the FT ranking. I did not look up other EMBA rankings.
Also SSE is ranked as a school in the FT European B school ranking:
http://rankings.ft.com/european-business-school-rankings

Hope that helps,
Suzy
quote

People please, give up about rankings, more serious concerns the future of the SSE MBA:

Stockholm class seeks amends
By Della Bradshaw, FT.com site
Published: Dec 09, 2007


Students on the full-time MBA programme at Sweden's Stockholm School of Economics are seeking financial compensation following a decision by the school's board that it will not recruit a new class next year.

Many of the 28 students on the one-year MBA believe the decision, taken on November 27, effectively terminates the programme, just three years after it opened in 2004. However, at the next board meeting in March the future of the full-time MBA will be revisited, says Peter Hägglund, chief executive of IFL, the executive education arm of SSE.

The latest announcements only add to the confusion surrounding SSE's MBA programme. Early last month, reports appeared in the Swedish press saying the MBA programme would be terminated. Then in mid-November Lars Bergman, president of SSE, told the Financial Times that the programme would continue in 2008, but would be redesigned.

The school says its full-time MBA programme is a casualty of the Swedish government's implementation of the Bologna accord, the European Union-backed initiative intended to harmonise degree formats across Europe. In Sweden the new regulations, which became effective on July 1, require all masters degrees to be two years in length and - perhaps more significantly - to be offered free of charge to students from the EU. However, it will be illegal only to charge fees to individual participants. It will still be legal to charge fees for programmes where the students are company-sponsored - SSE's executive MBAs for example.

When the SSE board meets in March it is expected to propose a different type of degree, which will be two years in length and may be aimed at younger students.

In countries such as France, which has also opted to make masters degrees two years in length, MBA degrees are not included in the ruling. Indeed many French business schools offer one-year MBA degrees alongside their two-year masters programmes.

The students on SSE's MBA cohort delivered a letter to the school on November 30 asking for compensation for the programme closure. This is expected to include reimbursement of their fees plus expenses for moving house and so on. Although the class of 2008 will complete the programme, they are concerned that the degree's value and reputation will be damaged.

As well as the wrath of the students, SSE officials will also have to explain their position to the programme's alumni and others, such as industrial mentors.

One of the innovative features of the full-time MBA in Stockholm has been that students are mentored by Swedish business leaders, such as Jacob Wallenberg of the banking group SEB.

People please, give up about rankings, more serious concerns the future of the SSE MBA:

Stockholm class seeks amends
By Della Bradshaw, FT.com site
Published: Dec 09, 2007


Students on the full-time MBA programme at Sweden's Stockholm School of Economics are seeking financial compensation following a decision by the school's board that it will not recruit a new class next year.

Many of the 28 students on the one-year MBA believe the decision, taken on November 27, effectively terminates the programme, just three years after it opened in 2004. However, at the next board meeting in March the future of the full-time MBA will be revisited, says Peter Hägglund, chief executive of IFL, the executive education arm of SSE.

The latest announcements only add to the confusion surrounding SSE's MBA programme. Early last month, reports appeared in the Swedish press saying the MBA programme would be terminated. Then in mid-November Lars Bergman, president of SSE, told the Financial Times that the programme would continue in 2008, but would be redesigned.

The school says its full-time MBA programme is a casualty of the Swedish government's implementation of the Bologna accord, the European Union-backed initiative intended to harmonise degree formats across Europe. In Sweden the new regulations, which became effective on July 1, require all masters degrees to be two years in length and - perhaps more significantly - to be offered free of charge to students from the EU. However, it will be illegal only to charge fees to individual participants. It will still be legal to charge fees for programmes where the students are company-sponsored - SSE's executive MBAs for example.

When the SSE board meets in March it is expected to propose a different type of degree, which will be two years in length and may be aimed at younger students.

In countries such as France, which has also opted to make masters degrees two years in length, MBA degrees are not included in the ruling. Indeed many French business schools offer one-year MBA degrees alongside their two-year masters programmes.

The students on SSE's MBA cohort delivered a letter to the school on November 30 asking for compensation for the programme closure. This is expected to include reimbursement of their fees plus expenses for moving house and so on. Although the class of 2008 will complete the programme, they are concerned that the degree's value and reputation will be damaged.

As well as the wrath of the students, SSE officials will also have to explain their position to the programme's alumni and others, such as industrial mentors.

One of the innovative features of the full-time MBA in Stockholm has been that students are mentored by Swedish business leaders, such as Jacob Wallenberg of the banking group SEB.

quote
david7685

>In Sweden the new regulations, which became effective on
>July 1, require all masters degrees to be two years in length
>and - perhaps more significantly - to be offered free of
>charge to students from the EU

Now that certainly makes it impossible for any private school to survive! Plus, they are forcing them to change the duration of their program to two years? Bureaucrats!

David

>In Sweden the new regulations, which became effective on
>July 1, require all masters degrees to be two years in length
>and - perhaps more significantly - to be offered free of
>charge to students from the EU

Now that certainly makes it impossible for any private school to survive! Plus, they are forcing them to change the duration of their program to two years? Bureaucrats!

David
quote

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