RSM vs WHU in Supply Chain


Hi
I just got admitted into RSM and WHU for MSC in Supply Chain Managenent. Since both schools seem to have good reputation. So can anyone share idea about these schools?

Also I concern about my carreer path after my study. Which would have more opportunity for a student from Asia like me?

Thank you in advance
Hi
I just got admitted into RSM and WHU for MSC in Supply Chain Managenent. Since both schools seem to have good reputation. So can anyone share idea about these schools?

Also I concern about my carreer path after my study. Which would have more opportunity for a student from Asia like me?

Thank you in advance
quote
Duncan
Take a look at:
How to use LinkedIn to find the best school www.find-mba.com/board/33571
Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713
Best schools for international students' placement http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143
Take a look at:
How to use LinkedIn to find the best school www.find-mba.com/board/33571
Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713
Best schools for international students' placement http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143
quote
eduaudax
You state that you are admitted at WHU for MSc in Supply Chain Management. Probably you mean that you are admitted to WHU's MSc MiM program and want to choose the Supply Chain concentration of the program. WHU to my knowledge offers no specific supply chain program. This means that during your study at WHU, you will also have courses outside the field of supply chain management.
The program at RSM is a specialized supply chain program.

If you look at rankings, you should know that it is the CEMS program of RSM that is ranked by the Financial times, and that it is MiM program for WHU.

Regarding the future career path, I want to tell you that in Germany internships are an important way to secure full-time entry positions. Especially with the company you interned with but also with other companies from the industry or roles with the function you interned at.

That said it makes sense for WHU as German business school to give you the the summer time for an internship.
Being a one-year program I think it is hard to fit an internship into the RSM program. The RSM program site states that an internship is optional and can be included, but I find it hard to belive that this internship can easily be included during the curriculum year.
I don't know the Dutch labor market well enough to comment on the role of an intership there.

Lastly, I can only support Duncan's point of language. In case you want to go to a German-region university with the aim to find work in the German-speaking region, try to reach at least a basic German language level (e.g. basic vocab + grammar rules) before (!) you go to Germany. First, it makes sense to have a level of the local knowledge when you apply for job positions, not at the end of the studies. Second, it makes it easier to connect with local students who can help you in practicing the language.
You state that you are admitted at WHU for MSc in Supply Chain Management. Probably you mean that you are admitted to WHU's MSc MiM program and want to choose the Supply Chain concentration of the program. WHU to my knowledge offers no specific supply chain program. This means that during your study at WHU, you will also have courses outside the field of supply chain management.
The program at RSM is a specialized supply chain program.

If you look at rankings, you should know that it is the CEMS program of RSM that is ranked by the Financial times, and that it is MiM program for WHU.

Regarding the future career path, I want to tell you that in Germany internships are an important way to secure full-time entry positions. Especially with the company you interned with but also with other companies from the industry or roles with the function you interned at.

That said it makes sense for WHU as German business school to give you the the summer time for an internship.
Being a one-year program I think it is hard to fit an internship into the RSM program. The RSM program site states that an internship is optional and can be included, but I find it hard to belive that this internship can easily be included during the curriculum year.
I don't know the Dutch labor market well enough to comment on the role of an intership there.

Lastly, I can only support Duncan's point of language. In case you want to go to a German-region university with the aim to find work in the German-speaking region, try to reach at least a basic German language level (e.g. basic vocab + grammar rules) before (!) you go to Germany. First, it makes sense to have a level of the local knowledge when you apply for job positions, not at the end of the studies. Second, it makes it easier to connect with local students who can help you in practicing the language.
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