Online MBA renewable energy


Hi

I am a 25 year old chemical engineer who is interested in taking a online MBA course in renewable energy through MBA renewables. I would like some advice on whether getting an MBA with a FIBAA accreditation will be worth getting if I dont plan on working in Germany afterwards. I would most likely continue working in London so would like to know if it is internationally recognised.

I would appreciate if anyone could advise me on this matter

Thanks in advance

Hi

I am a 25 year old chemical engineer who is interested in taking a online MBA course in renewable energy through MBA renewables. I would like some advice on whether getting an MBA with a FIBAA accreditation will be worth getting if I dont plan on working in Germany afterwards. I would most likely continue working in London so would like to know if it is internationally recognised.

I would appreciate if anyone could advise me on this matter

Thanks in advance
quote
Duncan

I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy. 

I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy. 
quote

I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy. 


With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline. 

So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on. 

I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US). 

I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA. 

Hope that helps - Drew 

[quote]I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline.&nbsp;<br><br>So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on.&nbsp;<br><br>I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US).&nbsp;<br><br>I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA.&nbsp;<br><br>Hope that helps - Drew&nbsp;
quote
Duncan

It's a long discussion but there is a difference between an well-accredited MBA with a general management core and an elective specialisation in something, on the one hand, and a thing which really isn't an MBA but is a specialised energy degree that lacks a serious general management core. 

Beyond that, the more conjunctual and topical a specialization, the less market value it has. 

It's a long discussion but there is a difference between an well-accredited MBA with a general management core and an elective specialisation in something, on the one hand, and a thing which really isn't an MBA but is a specialised energy degree that lacks a serious general management core.&nbsp;<br><br>Beyond that, the more conjunctual and topical a specialization, the less market value it has.&nbsp;
quote

It's a long discussion but there is a difference between an well-accredited MBA with a general management core and an elective specialisation in something, on the one hand, and a thing which really isn't an MBA but is a specialised energy degree that lacks a serious general management core. 

Beyond that, the more conjunctual and topical a specialization, the less market value it has. 


So an MBA with a top-accreditation and an elective in the specialisation I would like to do, would be more beneficial for me in the job market of becoming a manager or starting my own company than something like the MBA renewables which has a lower teir accreditation? 

[quote]It's a long discussion but there is a difference between an well-accredited MBA with a general management core and an elective specialisation in something, on the one hand, and a thing which really isn't an MBA but is a specialised energy degree that lacks a serious general management core.&nbsp;<br><br>Beyond that, the more conjunctual and topical a specialization, the less market value it has.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>So an MBA with a top-accreditation and an elective in the specialisation I would like to do, would be more beneficial for me in the job market of becoming a manager or starting my own company than something like the MBA renewables which has a lower teir accreditation?&nbsp;
quote

I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy. 


With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline. 

So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on. 

I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US). 

I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA. 

Hope that helps - Drew 


Thanks for the reply. I have found this quiet insightful as I have also been struggling with whether i should do a MSc or an MBA. 

Along with the MBA you have chosen to do I have also seen that the MBA at Robert Kennedy College in collaboration with the University of Cumbria has an energy specialisation and would like to know your opinion on that as you seem to have done some research and i am only starting mine. 

If I am going to go the MBA route I would like to do a top-accredited MBA

[quote][quote]I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline.&nbsp;<br><br>So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on.&nbsp;<br><br>I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US).&nbsp;<br><br>I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA.&nbsp;<br><br>Hope that helps - Drew&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Thanks for the reply. I have found this quiet insightful as I have also been struggling with whether i should do a MSc or an MBA.&nbsp;<br><br>Along with the MBA you have chosen to do I have also seen that the MBA at Robert Kennedy College in collaboration with the University of Cumbria has an energy specialisation and would like to know your opinion on that as you seem to have done some research and i am only starting mine.&nbsp;<br><br>If I am going to go the MBA route I would like to do a top-accredited MBA
quote
Duncan

Cumbria has none of the three respected accreditation standards. 

Cumbria has none of the three respected accreditation standards.&nbsp;
quote

I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy. 


With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline. 

So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on. 

I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US). 

I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA. 

Hope that helps - Drew 


Thanks for the reply. I have found this quiet insightful as I have also been struggling with whether i should do a MSc or an MBA. 

Along with the MBA you have chosen to do I have also seen that the MBA at Robert Kennedy College in collaboration with the University of Cumbria has an energy specialisation and would like to know your opinion on that as you seem to have done some research and i am only starting mine. 

If I am going to go the MBA route I would like to do a top-accredited MBA


As Duncan mentioned, you are going to want to stick with schools with a strong accreditation. AACSB being principal among them. Some programs have a triple accreditation - which is excellent. AACSB, AMBA, and EQUIS. However simply having these is not the only factor in choosing a school. 

You want to find the main reasons driving you towards and MBA. Progression in your current company, transition into a new industry, etc. And develop a short list based on these. My thought process went something like this. 

Making great money (well into 6 figures) in my current role, however I have topped out where I am. I would also like to remain in the energy industry - but change locations. I want to work in Europe. 

Narrowed my list down to schools in my price range, somewhere I would like to live, with solid placement in my desired industry. RGU in Aberdeen fit the bill - and as it turns out I have connections to many companies currently operating there. 

If you are not willing to spend a solid bit of money on a well developed program, at a respected school - to get an MBA - I would suggest looking towards the MSc route. Most can be had for a fraction of the price, and depending on your current role and work experience can still help you progress in your career. For me personally, the MSc would have done very little to nothing, given my current role. 

Hope that helps a bit. 

[quote][quote][quote]I think that, from first principles, an MBA in renewable energy can be dismissed. You either want a master's in business administration or a master's in renewable energy.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>With all due respect, not sure what you are getting at here? As I am sure you are well aware, specialized MBA`s are not only becoming more popular - but many programs are counting on them to keep the MBA "relevant" as prestige and new applicants continues to decline.&nbsp;<br><br>So to the original poster, I am by no means the expert here. However I am in the energy industry, and I have been researching MBAs for some time now. There are plenty of good MBA programs focusing on Energy - and Renewables, however the one you listed does not seem to be worth the paper its printed on.&nbsp;<br><br>I will be attending RGU`s MBA in Sustainability and Energy Transitions this fall. I initially applied for their MBA in Oil and Gas program, and after my admissions interview the team there made me aware of the Energy Transitions MBA - which seems like a no brainer given the current climate of the energy industry globally (especially here in the US).&nbsp;<br><br>I briefly considered an MSc - but given my work experience, and the types of roles I will be applying for post graduation, I chose the MBA.&nbsp;<br><br>Hope that helps - Drew&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Thanks for the reply. I have found this quiet insightful as I have also been struggling with whether i should do a MSc or an MBA.&nbsp;<br><br>Along with the MBA you have chosen to do I have also seen that the MBA at Robert Kennedy College in collaboration with the University of Cumbria has an energy specialisation and would like to know your opinion on that as you seem to have done some research and i am only starting mine.&nbsp;<br><br>If I am going to go the MBA route I would like to do a top-accredited MBA [/quote]<br><br>As Duncan mentioned, you are going to want to stick with schools with a strong accreditation. AACSB being principal among them. Some programs have a triple accreditation - which is excellent. AACSB, AMBA, and EQUIS. However simply having these is not the only factor in choosing a school.&nbsp;<br><br>You want to find the main reasons driving you towards and MBA. Progression in your current company, transition into a new industry, etc. And develop a short list based on these. My thought process went something like this.&nbsp;<br><br>Making great money (well into 6 figures) in my current role, however I have topped out where I am. I would also like to remain in the energy industry - but change locations. I want to work in Europe.&nbsp;<br><br>Narrowed my list down to schools in my price range, somewhere I would like to live, with solid placement in my desired industry. RGU in Aberdeen fit the bill - and as it turns out I have connections to many companies currently operating there.&nbsp;<br><br>If you are not willing to spend a solid bit of money on a well developed program, at a respected school - to get an MBA - I would suggest looking towards the MSc route. Most can be had for a fraction of the price, and depending on your current role and work experience can still help you progress in your career. For me personally, the MSc would have done very little to nothing, given my current role.&nbsp;<br><br>Hope that helps a bit.&nbsp;
quote

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