EADA, Barcelona


LP

Hi Katalina,

Carlos III is one of the most prestigious centers of higher education in Spain, and is very well known throughout Europe. It has been very innovative in several respects: it was one of the first Spanish universities (public or private) to deliver graduate and undergraduate programs in English, to hire its faculty internationally, and to establish a "US-style" tenure-track system based on research outcomes (faculty are hired upon completion of PhD program and have to publish in good journals or otherwise are fired). The schools that you mention did have programs in English, but did not have "US-style" tenure track systems: they would hire professors and then keep them even if they didn't have good research records. In that sense Carlos III has been ahead of the business schools. It also has very nice facilities and beautiful campuses which do not conform with the stereotype.

I don't know what you mean by "real" business or by sophistication. Carlos III follows the US business school model, which emphasizes research. Faculty at Wharton or Kellogg is not composed of practitioners: faculty members are 90% academics who have to prove themselves mostly by doing research, and also by effectively teaching. But research is most important. ESADE and EADA follow a different system, where research is not that important. Their publication records are very poor. IE used to be like that but has tried to change, and IESE is somewhere in between.

UT Dallas has a ranking of schools based on business research. You can google it. It's a nice ranking because it focuses on the quality rather than the quantity of research. You'll notice two things. First, all Spanish institutions are pretty mediocre in research, and that includes IESE, IE, ESADE, etc. They don't even make it to the top 100, and are far from there. Second, within Spain, IESE comes first, then comes Carlos III, then IE,and finally ESADE and EADA.

As far as employability is concerned, Carlos III is very well known to Spanish employers and has a very good reputation within Spain. Although the MBA is very small, it has a large undergraduate degree in business which is considered among the best in Spain.

I don't think Carlos is well known to foreign employers, but neither is EADA. In fact, I would say that Carlos is better known than EADA. But my point is that it's not really a matter of "publics" versus "privates". You have to look at it program by program. In Spain there are good and bad public universities, and also good and bad private schools. You can't oversimplify.

I also think networking opportunities are weak at Carlos III, but I don't think this has to do with its public nature. I think it has to do with the fact that the program is quite young, so there's not many alumni "out there". IESE, IE and ESADE have a clear lead there.

I also have a question for you. I don't really understand why you are so interested in a Spanish MBA. If you want something really global I think you should definitely go to the US. I think this is where the most serious schools are. Is it because you are looking for a one-year degree, or is it a financial matter perhaps?

Hi Katalina,

Carlos III is one of the most prestigious centers of higher education in Spain, and is very well known throughout Europe. It has been very innovative in several respects: it was one of the first Spanish universities (public or private) to deliver graduate and undergraduate programs in English, to hire its faculty internationally, and to establish a "US-style" tenure-track system based on research outcomes (faculty are hired upon completion of PhD program and have to publish in good journals or otherwise are fired). The schools that you mention did have programs in English, but did not have "US-style" tenure track systems: they would hire professors and then keep them even if they didn't have good research records. In that sense Carlos III has been ahead of the business schools. It also has very nice facilities and beautiful campuses which do not conform with the stereotype.

I don't know what you mean by "real" business or by sophistication. Carlos III follows the US business school model, which emphasizes research. Faculty at Wharton or Kellogg is not composed of practitioners: faculty members are 90% academics who have to prove themselves mostly by doing research, and also by effectively teaching. But research is most important. ESADE and EADA follow a different system, where research is not that important. Their publication records are very poor. IE used to be like that but has tried to change, and IESE is somewhere in between.

UT Dallas has a ranking of schools based on business research. You can google it. It's a nice ranking because it focuses on the quality rather than the quantity of research. You'll notice two things. First, all Spanish institutions are pretty mediocre in research, and that includes IESE, IE, ESADE, etc. They don't even make it to the top 100, and are far from there. Second, within Spain, IESE comes first, then comes Carlos III, then IE,and finally ESADE and EADA.

As far as employability is concerned, Carlos III is very well known to Spanish employers and has a very good reputation within Spain. Although the MBA is very small, it has a large undergraduate degree in business which is considered among the best in Spain.

I don't think Carlos is well known to foreign employers, but neither is EADA. In fact, I would say that Carlos is better known than EADA. But my point is that it's not really a matter of "publics" versus "privates". You have to look at it program by program. In Spain there are good and bad public universities, and also good and bad private schools. You can't oversimplify.

I also think networking opportunities are weak at Carlos III, but I don't think this has to do with its public nature. I think it has to do with the fact that the program is quite young, so there's not many alumni "out there". IESE, IE and ESADE have a clear lead there.

I also have a question for you. I don't really understand why you are so interested in a Spanish MBA. If you want something really global I think you should definitely go to the US. I think this is where the most serious schools are. Is it because you are looking for a one-year degree, or is it a financial matter perhaps?
quote
katalina

Hello Jaitego,

thanks for your answer.
You ask me why I'm interested in Spanish MBA progs, there are two main reasons, language and costs. Otherwise I'd chose to go to the US, as you say, to get something "really global", and because in Latin America it's more prestigeous to hold a US degree.
As for language, my English is ok, but I feel a lot more confortable to do my MBA in Spanish, it's such a demanding program, I don't have the courage to do it in English. As for costs, good Spanish MBAs tend to be cheaper than US ones, and also living costs. That's why I'm so keen on info about Carlos III: It seems to be an outstanding program, but tuition is comparably very low for the reasons you explain, and regarding my financial possibilities, this is a key factor for my decision making. Maybe a pity that money counts so much, but that's how it is.
Besides, for me it is easier to study in Spain for the paperstuff, as visa.

I understand that people who want to stay in Spain afterwards to work there will have most benefit of a Spanish MBA. I will definitely go to Spain for the reasons above, and most likely return to my country to work there after finishing the MBA (we'll see...), so for me it is very important to determine the INTERNATIONAL appeal and reputation of a program, for instance the question if international employers come and recruit those MBA holders, and not only Spanish companies.
I find it very interesting to read about the different focusses of Spanish B Schools, like strength inr research, but it's true that for me other arguments come first. Unfortunately, because for me personally counts most what I'll learn, the content - but I have to think first of the outcome in terms of job prospects.

Anyways, after reading your comments, and some of the fromer posts about Spanish MBA, Carlos III is first on my list, and I am glad that public Universities in Spain do offer such quality programs as an MBA for low, subsidised, tuition.

Hello Jaitego,

thanks for your answer.
You ask me why I'm interested in Spanish MBA progs, there are two main reasons, language and costs. Otherwise I'd chose to go to the US, as you say, to get something "really global", and because in Latin America it's more prestigeous to hold a US degree.
As for language, my English is ok, but I feel a lot more confortable to do my MBA in Spanish, it's such a demanding program, I don't have the courage to do it in English. As for costs, good Spanish MBAs tend to be cheaper than US ones, and also living costs. That's why I'm so keen on info about Carlos III: It seems to be an outstanding program, but tuition is comparably very low for the reasons you explain, and regarding my financial possibilities, this is a key factor for my decision making. Maybe a pity that money counts so much, but that's how it is.
Besides, for me it is easier to study in Spain for the paperstuff, as visa.

I understand that people who want to stay in Spain afterwards to work there will have most benefit of a Spanish MBA. I will definitely go to Spain for the reasons above, and most likely return to my country to work there after finishing the MBA (we'll see...), so for me it is very important to determine the INTERNATIONAL appeal and reputation of a program, for instance the question if international employers come and recruit those MBA holders, and not only Spanish companies.
I find it very interesting to read about the different focusses of Spanish B Schools, like strength inr research, but it's true that for me other arguments come first. Unfortunately, because for me personally counts most what I'll learn, the content - but I have to think first of the outcome in terms of job prospects.

Anyways, after reading your comments, and some of the fromer posts about Spanish MBA, Carlos III is first on my list, and I am glad that public Universities in Spain do offer such quality programs as an MBA for low, subsidised, tuition.
quote
LP

Are you sure about your English? Have you tried TOEFL? To me, your English seems good enough to enrol in an English program, and in that way you would improve it. Of course you'll always be more comfortable in Spanish, but perhaps for this reason, isn't an English program worth trying?

If I may, I have another suggestion. Since you cannot visit the schools that you are interested in, why don't you try to contact some of their alumni from Venezuela? You could write to the schools and ask them whether they have alumni who are working in Venezuela and would be willing to talk to you. That way you can get first-hand information without visiting the schools. I'm not sure how cooperative schools will be, but I guess they'll be happy to help. After all, it is a way of promoting their programs. In addition, if you talk to some alumni before you do your MBA, you may have a chance to keep in touch with them afterwards and they may help you if you go back to Venezuela with your MBA title.

You mention that you care a lot about the MBA being recognized by international employers. On the one hand, the Carlos III MBA is not as well known as the big ones like IESE, ESADE or IE. On the other hand, the university is well known in Europe for its undergraduate and doctoral studies, so I would think this would also benefit its MBA graduates.

Are you sure about your English? Have you tried TOEFL? To me, your English seems good enough to enrol in an English program, and in that way you would improve it. Of course you'll always be more comfortable in Spanish, but perhaps for this reason, isn't an English program worth trying?

If I may, I have another suggestion. Since you cannot visit the schools that you are interested in, why don't you try to contact some of their alumni from Venezuela? You could write to the schools and ask them whether they have alumni who are working in Venezuela and would be willing to talk to you. That way you can get first-hand information without visiting the schools. I'm not sure how cooperative schools will be, but I guess they'll be happy to help. After all, it is a way of promoting their programs. In addition, if you talk to some alumni before you do your MBA, you may have a chance to keep in touch with them afterwards and they may help you if you go back to Venezuela with your MBA title.

You mention that you care a lot about the MBA being recognized by international employers. On the one hand, the Carlos III MBA is not as well known as the big ones like IESE, ESADE or IE. On the other hand, the university is well known in Europe for its undergraduate and doctoral studies, so I would think this would also benefit its MBA graduates.
quote
katalina

Thanks Jaitego for encouraging me!
Maybe I'm a bit silly what my English is concerned, I know that it's ok, but I just don't dare to do my MBA in a foreign language, since I want to have best results possible. Mainly this is because the oral English is my strength, but when it comes to writing on a high intellectual level, I feel too limited.

I will now do a little research on other MBAs in Spain offered by public schools, to have more options besides Carlos III where it is difficult to get in for its reputation, I presume.
Then, finally, I will start the application process..

I'll be back!

Kata


.

Thanks Jaitego for encouraging me!
Maybe I'm a bit silly what my English is concerned, I know that it's ok, but I just don't dare to do my MBA in a foreign language, since I want to have best results possible. Mainly this is because the oral English is my strength, but when it comes to writing on a high intellectual level, I feel too limited.

I will now do a little research on other MBAs in Spain offered by public schools, to have more options besides Carlos III where it is difficult to get in for its reputation, I presume.
Then, finally, I will start the application process..

I'll be back!

Kata


.
quote
pedro 56

Jaitego,

Just having a look on this forum just on the first two posts on Spain listed, it looks like you work in the MBA schools and more specifically for Carlos III which you are over-promoting. I hope I am mistaken but you give the same information of an informative session on this forum which should just avoid selling programmes.

Jaitego,

Just having a look on this forum just on the first two posts on Spain listed, it looks like you work in the MBA schools and more specifically for Carlos III which you are over-promoting. I hope I am mistaken but you give the same information of an informative session on this forum which should just avoid selling programmes.

quote
SingleSpai...

He could be working for them or be a MBA student...., but as soon as he start skiping key cuestions then we do not need anymore for saying that.

He could be working for them or be a MBA student...., but as soon as he start skiping key cuestions then we do not need anymore for saying that.

quote
LP

Dear SingleSpain and Pedro,

It suffices to read my posts to see that I always try to give information to back my opinions, and that I speak well of many programs, not only Carlos III. I encourage you to do the same thing. Opinions without information are not very useful. I find it better when people give their opinions and explain the reasons for what they say.

I've said several times that the MBA programs that I like the most are the top programs in the US. Because these are two-year programs, they give you a chance to specialize in the areas that you like the most or where you have more weaknesses. In addition, they have extremely good and devoted faculty, which I think is a must.

I've also said that, within Spain, the top MBA programs are IESE, ESADE, and Instituto de Empresa. I know less about EADA, but it seems like a very good program too. Having said that, Carlos III is also accredited (like these other four schools) and therefore must be a serious program. There are only 5 accredited programs in Spain and Carlos III is one of them, so it must be better than other Spanish programs that are not accredited. I think everyone can understand that.

I don't know why it makes you so upset that I highlight some positive things about Carlos III, but it doesn't upset you that I speak well of other programs. In any case, if you disagree with me, you should explain why.

Dear SingleSpain and Pedro,

It suffices to read my posts to see that I always try to give information to back my opinions, and that I speak well of many programs, not only Carlos III. I encourage you to do the same thing. Opinions without information are not very useful. I find it better when people give their opinions and explain the reasons for what they say.

I've said several times that the MBA programs that I like the most are the top programs in the US. Because these are two-year programs, they give you a chance to specialize in the areas that you like the most or where you have more weaknesses. In addition, they have extremely good and devoted faculty, which I think is a must.

I've also said that, within Spain, the top MBA programs are IESE, ESADE, and Instituto de Empresa. I know less about EADA, but it seems like a very good program too. Having said that, Carlos III is also accredited (like these other four schools) and therefore must be a serious program. There are only 5 accredited programs in Spain and Carlos III is one of them, so it must be better than other Spanish programs that are not accredited. I think everyone can understand that.

I don't know why it makes you so upset that I highlight some positive things about Carlos III, but it doesn't upset you that I speak well of other programs. In any case, if you disagree with me, you should explain why.
quote
SingleSpai...

Jaitego,

There are 3 or more international bodies for MBAS acreditations, and Carlos III is acredited by only one of them, while the other Spanish MBAS are accredited by three of them. So, even your main argumentation that you repeat in every message has its weakeness.

So, please, be more precise, and give us more arguments in favour of Carlos III, which is a an extension of a Public Spanish University, not even a business school. Eoi, Eada, EAe, Deusto, are better places that Carlos III for an MBA.

Jaitego,

There are 3 or more international bodies for MBAS acreditations, and Carlos III is acredited by only one of them, while the other Spanish MBAS are accredited by three of them. So, even your main argumentation that you repeat in every message has its weakeness.

So, please, be more precise, and give us more arguments in favour of Carlos III, which is a an extension of a Public Spanish University, not even a business school. Eoi, Eada, EAe, Deusto, are better places that Carlos III for an MBA.

quote
LP

SingleSpain

I don't think that there is such a big difference between one, two, or three international accreditations. For example, almost all US schools have one accreditation only. Accrediting bodies have very similar requirements, and once a school has obtained a particular accreditation, it can usually go on without problems and obtain the other ones. Schools not always do it, though. If you want another example, take IESE, which is an excellent program but is not AACSB accredited. Unlike you, I would never say that it is worse than IE, which has more accreditations. In fact, I like IESE more than IE.

I'm not here to give arguments in favor of Carlos III. I've just corrected your posts when I thought they were not accurate. For some reason, you don't like that program, which is Ok as long as the arguments you give are reasonable. I wouldn't write so much about Carlos III if you didn't say such inaccurate things about it.

I won't argue with you on the public ownership statement. I've already told you what I thought.

SingleSpain

I don't think that there is such a big difference between one, two, or three international accreditations. For example, almost all US schools have one accreditation only. Accrediting bodies have very similar requirements, and once a school has obtained a particular accreditation, it can usually go on without problems and obtain the other ones. Schools not always do it, though. If you want another example, take IESE, which is an excellent program but is not AACSB accredited. Unlike you, I would never say that it is worse than IE, which has more accreditations. In fact, I like IESE more than IE.

I'm not here to give arguments in favor of Carlos III. I've just corrected your posts when I thought they were not accurate. For some reason, you don't like that program, which is Ok as long as the arguments you give are reasonable. I wouldn't write so much about Carlos III if you didn't say such inaccurate things about it.

I won't argue with you on the public ownership statement. I've already told you what I thought.
quote
SingleSpai...

This is a public forum, a place where we can discuss, so I dont' go private with you. If you have something to say, do it here, or shut up.

I speak very clear, and I give reasonable arguments such as the lack of networking, the non -exsiting top tier recruiters, or the lack of prestige of this MBA among the business community in Spain or in Europe. In contrast, you do not provide any intelligent pros (we are still waiting for them).

This is a public forum, a place where we can discuss, so I dont' go private with you. If you have something to say, do it here, or shut up.

I speak very clear, and I give reasonable arguments such as the lack of networking, the non -exsiting top tier recruiters, or the lack of prestige of this MBA among the business community in Spain or in Europe. In contrast, you do not provide any intelligent pros (we are still waiting for them).







quote
LaVoz de G...

It's true that there may be some people in this board who try to push a specific MBA program for whatever reasons. However, I do not have the impression jaitego is one of these users. Just to the contrary I always found his posts well-balanced and interesting to read.

About Carlos III: I do not have any personal experience with that program and I had not heard about it before I read some of the posts on this website. Still I think seems to be a solid program. One fact that allows me to draw this conclusion is that ESCP-EAP (which is triple acctedited) has chosen it as its partner program in Spain. This is what ESCP-EAP says about this partnership:

"ESCP-EAP and Madrid's Carlos III University recently signed a five-year partnership agreement to encourage closer co-operation between the faculty and students of both institutions. A key component of the agreement is the creation of a joint Research Centre dedicated to the study of European economies and business practices. Founded in 1989 Carlos III is Madrid's youngest public university and with 25,000 registered students one of the three largest in the capital region. It hosts faculties of economics, business, law and engineering. The university has a reputation for its closeness to industry and its international activities."

http://www.escp-eap.net/newsletter/eng/template.php?design=blue&year=2006&month=4&rub=6

Now calm down everybody and be happy that there are more than just a few good MBA programs to choose from.

It's true that there may be some people in this board who try to push a specific MBA program for whatever reasons. However, I do not have the impression jaitego is one of these users. Just to the contrary I always found his posts well-balanced and interesting to read.

About Carlos III: I do not have any personal experience with that program and I had not heard about it before I read some of the posts on this website. Still I think seems to be a solid program. One fact that allows me to draw this conclusion is that ESCP-EAP (which is triple acctedited) has chosen it as its partner program in Spain. This is what ESCP-EAP says about this partnership:

"ESCP-EAP and Madrid's Carlos III University recently signed a five-year partnership agreement to encourage closer co-operation between the faculty and students of both institutions. A key component of the agreement is the creation of a joint Research Centre dedicated to the study of European economies and business practices. Founded in 1989 Carlos III is Madrid's youngest public university and with 25,000 registered students one of the three largest in the capital region. It hosts faculties of economics, business, law and engineering. The university has a reputation for its closeness to industry and its international activities."

http://www.escp-eap.net/newsletter/eng/template.php?design=blue&year=2006&month=4&rub=6

Now calm down everybody and be happy that there are more than just a few good MBA programs to choose from.
quote
SingleSpai...

Charles,

If you don't think that Jaitego has a bias towards Carlos III, please review again his lasts posts.

Should we say that Carlos III is the best MBA in Spain, and a promise top 30 in the world?

Maybe, according to Jaitego, we can say yes, based on the American research aproach that Calors III is also hiring the best US teachers from Harvard and Wharton, and makes the other schools very far away from the excelence of Carlos III.


Charles,

If you don't think that Jaitego has a bias towards Carlos III, please review again his lasts posts.

Should we say that Carlos III is the best MBA in Spain, and a promise top 30 in the world?

Maybe, according to Jaitego, we can say yes, based on the American research aproach that Calors III is also hiring the best US teachers from Harvard and Wharton, and makes the other schools very far away from the excelence of Carlos III.


quote
Mario

There are interesting scholasrship in Barcelona with EADA and in Madrid with IE, a friend of mine has been offered some interesting ones during the selection process, ask the admission department of both.

Regards

There are interesting scholasrship in Barcelona with EADA and in Madrid with IE, a friend of mine has been offered some interesting ones during the selection process, ask the admission department of both.

Regards
quote
ilay

Hi everyone ,
ı am ilay from turkey
I am looking for a masters degree program ( esp MBA and marketing) in barcelona.
does anyone have any idea about Universitat de Barcelona.

Hi everyone ,
ı am ilay from turkey
I am looking for a masters degree program ( esp MBA and marketing) in barcelona.
does anyone have any idea about Universitat de Barcelona.
quote
Mario

Universitat de Barcelona is really good fo undergraduate degrees, has lots of fields and excelent profesors, but for MBA and business Msters, look at the experts in Barcelona,IESE ESADE and EADA or in Madrid in IE they offer excelent masters

Universitat de Barcelona is really good fo undergraduate degrees, has lots of fields and excelent profesors, but for MBA and business Msters, look at the experts in Barcelona,IESE ESADE and EADA or in Madrid in IE they offer excelent masters
quote
Pratick

Hi,
I am writing from India, I am really interested in studying in Barcelona and I have seen that EADA is rising a lot in the Rankings now been 87th in teh Economist one, it looks like a good option. i have seen lots of debate about this school but it looks that no former alumni have written on their experience. Is someone keen on giving me some feedback?

Sincerely

Hi,
I am writing from India, I am really interested in studying in Barcelona and I have seen that EADA is rising a lot in the Rankings now been 87th in teh Economist one, it looks like a good option. i have seen lots of debate about this school but it looks that no former alumni have written on their experience. Is someone keen on giving me some feedback?

Sincerely
quote
Mario

Pratick,
There are some hundreds of posts in this forum about spanish business school, just take your time and you will find lots of information

Pratick,
There are some hundreds of posts in this forum about spanish business school, just take your time and you will find lots of information

quote
James

Since i have noticed that new forum windows are open on an issue which has been widely described (EADA in this specific case) I recall to this forum old windows to answer that the EADA test online are based on numerical and verbal skills and are a cheap option to the GMAT, but still consider that if you do not do the test yourself the shool does random checks along the year and more important, if you then do not have the verbal and numerical level to follow the MBA they will take you out of the MBA and reimburse part of the fee. Which has already happened.

Since i have noticed that new forum windows are open on an issue which has been widely described (EADA in this specific case) I recall to this forum old windows to answer that the EADA test online are based on numerical and verbal skills and are a cheap option to the GMAT, but still consider that if you do not do the test yourself the shool does random checks along the year and more important, if you then do not have the verbal and numerical level to follow the MBA they will take you out of the MBA and reimburse part of the fee. Which has already happened.
quote
Platon

Cool James and Mario,

I have read the other posts and looks clear the test issue.
BNut I don not care now, I have already been admitted to EADA which is my first option because of the programme length, the price and location, but I am also into IE, Machester Business School & Hult.
The nextstep is the job. I have been in touch with a spanish lawyer and she told me that the government is delivering the working permit quicklier, but you still need to have a company sponsoring you.
The question is, having an MBA does it make a difference in Spain/Barcelona job wise?

Cool James and Mario,

I have read the other posts and looks clear the test issue.
BNut I don not care now, I have already been admitted to EADA which is my first option because of the programme length, the price and location, but I am also into IE, Machester Business School & Hult.
The nextstep is the job. I have been in touch with a spanish lawyer and she told me that the government is delivering the working permit quicklier, but you still need to have a company sponsoring you.
The question is, having an MBA does it make a difference in Spain/Barcelona job wise?
quote
lukeh

I'm sure it does.

I'm sure it does.
quote

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