EADA, Barcelona


katalina

I agree SingleSpain. The high tuition creates unfair competition for students from poorer countries, and most Bschools don't help to correct this in the sense that they would make it easier for those students to get scholarships. Ingeneral scholarships depend on the achievements, depends on results and profile of the candidate.

There are some exceptions though, like in Sweden or the Netherlands, there are special scholarships for students coming from "poorer" countries because of their lower chances to access high level education.

I'd wish schools in other countries would copy..

I agree SingleSpain. The high tuition creates unfair competition for students from poorer countries, and most Bschools don't help to correct this in the sense that they would make it easier for those students to get scholarships. Ingeneral scholarships depend on the achievements, depends on results and profile of the candidate.

There are some exceptions though, like in Sweden or the Netherlands, there are special scholarships for students coming from "poorer" countries because of their lower chances to access high level education.

I'd wish schools in other countries would copy..
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katalina

BTW I'm not from Russia.. but from Venezuela

BTW I'm not from Russia.. but from Venezuela
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James

The price of the MBa has always been an issue, as per any kind of expensive, and often good quality, education.

Do not forget it is a business, but a business made of big numbers, so you might find your scholarship in the least expected place, look for it there are more than you think.

good luck

The price of the MBa has always been an issue, as per any kind of expensive, and often good quality, education.

Do not forget it is a business, but a business made of big numbers, so you might find your scholarship in the least expected place, look for it there are more than you think.

good luck
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ro

hi, what would you recomend if i want to do an mba but have a low budget, on one side I have 50% scolarship granted eae, but it seem to me that coments towards it are not so good, the problem is despite my eforts i cant afford one of the top 3.

any good sugestions.

hi, what would you recomend if i want to do an mba but have a low budget, on one side I have 50% scolarship granted eae, but it seem to me that coments towards it are not so good, the problem is despite my eforts i cant afford one of the top 3.

any good sugestions.
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SingleSpai...

Dude,

Banco Sabadell, which is a Spanish Bank, offers a loan for 50.000 euros without co-signer. I think it´s worth to ask info about it.

Which is your profile?

Dude,

Banco Sabadell, which is a Spanish Bank, offers a loan for 50.000 euros without co-signer. I think it´s worth to ask info about it.

Which is your profile?
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LP

If you are looking for something in Spain, you may also want to check the Carlos III MBA. It is accredited and reasonably priced. All other accredited programs are more expensive.

If you are looking for something in Spain, you may also want to check the Carlos III MBA. It is accredited and reasonably priced. All other accredited programs are more expensive.
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carodel

Correct, Carlos III and also IE in Madrid offer a more reasonable MBA, especially the spanish version is cheaper than the english one.

The same applies in Barcelona with EADA which have better prices a different price for english and spanish MBA

Correct, Carlos III and also IE in Madrid offer a more reasonable MBA, especially the spanish version is cheaper than the english one.

The same applies in Barcelona with EADA which have better prices a different price for english and spanish MBA
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SingleSpai...

Are you sure that Carlos III is offering an MBA? Such MBA with a cost of 9.000 euros, is ridiculous...

I have serious doubts about the quality of the program, the quality of the professors, and career services,...

Could you provide any succesfull experience?

Are you sure that Carlos III is offering an MBA? Such MBA with a cost of 9.000 euros, is ridiculous...

I have serious doubts about the quality of the program, the quality of the professors, and career services,...

Could you provide any succesfull experience?

quote
LP

I don't have any doubts about the quality of the program at Carlos III, given that it is accredited by the Association of MBAs, one of the three big accrediting agencies. Accreditation is only granted after a careful external audit, which is conducted by deans or directors from other accredited schools. Carlos III wouldn't be accredited if it didn't have a good-quality program.

As for prices, if I'm not mistaken, Carlos III is a public university and I guess it receives a lot of government funding. In a private school, tuition has to be higher because it must be enough to pay for most costs. In a public university, many of these costs are paid by the government. So the fact that tuition is low doesn't imply that the faculty, facilities or services are bad --it just means that somebody else (the government) is paying a big part of it, whereas in a private school students have to pay for everything.

I don't have any doubts about the quality of the program at Carlos III, given that it is accredited by the Association of MBAs, one of the three big accrediting agencies. Accreditation is only granted after a careful external audit, which is conducted by deans or directors from other accredited schools. Carlos III wouldn't be accredited if it didn't have a good-quality program.

As for prices, if I'm not mistaken, Carlos III is a public university and I guess it receives a lot of government funding. In a private school, tuition has to be higher because it must be enough to pay for most costs. In a public university, many of these costs are paid by the government. So the fact that tuition is low doesn't imply that the faculty, facilities or services are bad --it just means that somebody else (the government) is paying a big part of it, whereas in a private school students have to pay for everything.
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SingleSpai...

Yes, Spanish Public Universities are mostly funded by the Government. A typycal scheme would be 20% paid by students´ fees and 80% is paid by public budgets, but it depends of the University, but not big differences.

In the case of the MBA: the advantges of a business school are in many aspects as for instance recruiters (top notch consulting firms, banks, multinationals, etc) do prefer the prestigious schools. Also for networking (does not exist at all here in Publics), track record (IESE or ESADE have more than 30 years of MBAS), entrepreneurship, flexibility in the program, ability to atrack best teachers (in Publics, teachers are there for life as public servants),...

Yes, Spanish Public Universities are mostly funded by the Government. A typycal scheme would be 20% paid by students´ fees and 80% is paid by public budgets, but it depends of the University, but not big differences.

In the case of the MBA: the advantges of a business school are in many aspects as for instance recruiters (top notch consulting firms, banks, multinationals, etc) do prefer the prestigious schools. Also for networking (does not exist at all here in Publics), track record (IESE or ESADE have more than 30 years of MBAS), entrepreneurship, flexibility in the program, ability to atrack best teachers (in Publics, teachers are there for life as public servants),...



quote
katalina

I'm surprised to read your comment about life time professors in Carlos III MBA rogram, Singlespain. I always thought that doing an MBA in a public university has the advantage to be more or less subsidised, with public money, as you describe it. But I was convinced that same mechanisms as in private BSchools are applied to attract the best professors - as this is a key factor for the standing of a school.
Especially in a good program as the MBA in Carlos III, how could they maintain the high standard of their MBA with a team od public servant teachers, once in the job always in the job?

I'm surprised to read your comment about life time professors in Carlos III MBA rogram, Singlespain. I always thought that doing an MBA in a public university has the advantage to be more or less subsidised, with public money, as you describe it. But I was convinced that same mechanisms as in private BSchools are applied to attract the best professors - as this is a key factor for the standing of a school.
Especially in a good program as the MBA in Carlos III, how could they maintain the high standard of their MBA with a team od public servant teachers, once in the job always in the job?
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LP

Katalina,

Don't be mislead: the tenure system (which is what SingleSpain refers to) exists all over the world, in both private and public universities or business schools.

Wharton, Harvard, Kellogg, MIT, ... you name it. Every good university or business school has a system whereby professors, after a "tenure-track" period where they have to publish research in good journals, either get tenure (employment for life) or are denied tenure and must go somewhere else. I don't think Carlos III is different in that respect, and if you look at the web pages of any public or private university you'll see they all work the same way.

The key is not in whether there is a tenure system or no tenure system. The issue is how schools decide who gets tenure and who doesn't. This is precisely one of the things that accreditations look at when they assess the quality of the program or the school. They want to make sure that promotions to tenure are based on merit.

Finally, the tenure system does not imply that universities are not able to attract good professors. As I said, all good universities and business schools (again, private and public) have tenure systems and still professors go in and out, looking for better places in terms of salaries, research environment or life quality.

Katalina,

Don't be mislead: the tenure system (which is what SingleSpain refers to) exists all over the world, in both private and public universities or business schools.

Wharton, Harvard, Kellogg, MIT, ... you name it. Every good university or business school has a system whereby professors, after a "tenure-track" period where they have to publish research in good journals, either get tenure (employment for life) or are denied tenure and must go somewhere else. I don't think Carlos III is different in that respect, and if you look at the web pages of any public or private university you'll see they all work the same way.

The key is not in whether there is a tenure system or no tenure system. The issue is how schools decide who gets tenure and who doesn't. This is precisely one of the things that accreditations look at when they assess the quality of the program or the school. They want to make sure that promotions to tenure are based on merit.

Finally, the tenure system does not imply that universities are not able to attract good professors. As I said, all good universities and business schools (again, private and public) have tenure systems and still professors go in and out, looking for better places in terms of salaries, research environment or life quality.
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SingleSpai...

All,

What I am saying is that these professors are no the best to teach for business programs such as an MBA or executive education programs. As simple as this.

Anyway, in Publics, they tend to be there for "the rest of their life", most of them, at least in Spain. They do not have any flexibility that an MBA program need.

Which is your point, Jaiego about recruiters, netwotking, track record, international exposure?

All,

What I am saying is that these professors are no the best to teach for business programs such as an MBA or executive education programs. As simple as this.

Anyway, in Publics, they tend to be there for "the rest of their life", most of them, at least in Spain. They do not have any flexibility that an MBA program need.

Which is your point, Jaiego about recruiters, netwotking, track record, international exposure?


quote
LP

I'm just saying that you have given information that is at best inaccurate, and sometimes just false, and I'm explaining why.

The tenure system is used everywhere. So why do you say it is some kind of pathology and is incompatible with a good MBA? Public universities are subsidized everywhere, which means they can charge less. So why do you say a cheaper tuition is ridiculous? And finally, if a program is internationally accredited, how can you say it's not even an MBA? I don't know.

I'm just saying that you have given information that is at best inaccurate, and sometimes just false, and I'm explaining why.

The tenure system is used everywhere. So why do you say it is some kind of pathology and is incompatible with a good MBA? Public universities are subsidized everywhere, which means they can charge less. So why do you say a cheaper tuition is ridiculous? And finally, if a program is internationally accredited, how can you say it's not even an MBA? I don't know.
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sysha

hey,
i suppose this is a forum only for mba. but, im planning to do my bba and have been accepted into 4 unis. bbs, esei, and european university all in barcelona and schiller international university in madrid. im quite confused as im hearing mixed reviews about everything. any chance u can tell me which one of these offer the best education?? the websites aren helping at all.
thnks

hey,
i suppose this is a forum only for mba. but, im planning to do my bba and have been accepted into 4 unis. bbs, esei, and european university all in barcelona and schiller international university in madrid. im quite confused as im hearing mixed reviews about everything. any chance u can tell me which one of these offer the best education?? the websites aren helping at all.
thnks
quote
LP

Hello Sysha,

In Spain, the best reputed places to study a Bachelor's degree in business administration are Carlos III, Pompeu Fabra, and ESADE.

In terms of quality of faculty, Carlos III is the best, in my opinion. Pompeu is very good for economics, but so much for business, and in any case not as good as Carlos III in the business-related fields. ESADE is very well reputed for its MBA, but its BA is not so good, and its faculty is not as good as Carlos III in terms of research. None of the schools you've applied to are particularly good, and I wouldn't recommend them. Moreover, they must be really expensive compared to Carlos III or Pompeu, which are public.

The only Spanish ranking of Bachelor degrees, as far as I know, is the one made by the newspaper 'El Mundo', and it ranks Carlos III first, followed by Pompeu and ESADE:

http://aula.elmundo.es/aula/especiales/2007/50carreras/ade.html

Finally, you should know that in some of these schools, for example Carlos III, you can do your BBA in English, in case you don't know enough Spanish or are just interested in doing it in English for some other reason.

Hello Sysha,

In Spain, the best reputed places to study a Bachelor's degree in business administration are Carlos III, Pompeu Fabra, and ESADE.

In terms of quality of faculty, Carlos III is the best, in my opinion. Pompeu is very good for economics, but so much for business, and in any case not as good as Carlos III in the business-related fields. ESADE is very well reputed for its MBA, but its BA is not so good, and its faculty is not as good as Carlos III in terms of research. None of the schools you've applied to are particularly good, and I wouldn't recommend them. Moreover, they must be really expensive compared to Carlos III or Pompeu, which are public.

The only Spanish ranking of Bachelor degrees, as far as I know, is the one made by the newspaper 'El Mundo', and it ranks Carlos III first, followed by Pompeu and ESADE:

http://aula.elmundo.es/aula/especiales/2007/50carreras/ade.html

Finally, you should know that in some of these schools, for example Carlos III, you can do your BBA in English, in case you don't know enough Spanish or are just interested in doing it in English for some other reason.
quote
sysha

hey jaitego,
thanks a lot, i have written to carlos to find out if they are still accepting applications since i am a foreign student. i am dissappointed that not even one of the schools i applied to are worth it. thank u for pointing tht out to me. but i was just wondering incase i'm a bit late to get into carlos iii, which one of the ones i applied to would be better. ie, the least worst. u guessed right when u thought i did not know much spanish, which is why i applied to these schools as they tought in english. thanks for the info anyway. lemme know if u find anything else.

hey jaitego,
thanks a lot, i have written to carlos to find out if they are still accepting applications since i am a foreign student. i am dissappointed that not even one of the schools i applied to are worth it. thank u for pointing tht out to me. but i was just wondering incase i'm a bit late to get into carlos iii, which one of the ones i applied to would be better. ie, the least worst. u guessed right when u thought i did not know much spanish, which is why i applied to these schools as they tought in english. thanks for the info anyway. lemme know if u find anything else.
quote
LP

I don't know much about the schools you've applied to. I've had a look at their web pages and I don't see which one would be better. They are all pretty unknown in Spain and look quite similar in terms of quality.

Try Carlos. If you are too late, one possibility would be to spend next year in one of the places you've already been admitted to (for ex. Schiller, which is in Madrid too), and then move to Carlos. You could use next year to prepare your application materials for Carlos III. I guess you would enter Carlos as a first-year student, but you may be able to waive some subjects (you would have to check if first-year subjects at Schiller and Carlos are similar).

I don't know much about the schools you've applied to. I've had a look at their web pages and I don't see which one would be better. They are all pretty unknown in Spain and look quite similar in terms of quality.

Try Carlos. If you are too late, one possibility would be to spend next year in one of the places you've already been admitted to (for ex. Schiller, which is in Madrid too), and then move to Carlos. You could use next year to prepare your application materials for Carlos III. I guess you would enter Carlos as a first-year student, but you may be able to waive some subjects (you would have to check if first-year subjects at Schiller and Carlos are similar).
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sysha

hey jaitego,
thanks a lot. i will probably end up doing just that because carlos still has not replied and there are various procedures to go through which i dont think i will have the time for before the term begins. i will probably transfer my credits. thanks for all your help.

hey jaitego,
thanks a lot. i will probably end up doing just that because carlos still has not replied and there are various procedures to go through which i dont think i will have the time for before the term begins. i will probably transfer my credits. thanks for all your help.
quote
katalina


In the case of the MBA: the advantges of a business school are in many aspects as for instance recruiters (top notch consulting firms, banks, multinationals, etc) do prefer the prestigious schools. Also for networking (does not exist at all here in Publics), track record (IESE or ESADE have more than 30 years of MBAS), entrepreneurship, flexibility in the program, ability to atrack best teachers (in Publics, teachers are there for life as public servants),...


Hi Jaitego,
I'm very curious to get your point of view on the above post by SingleSpain.
I would think that in all these aspects named above (recruiters, networking, flexibility of program, entrepreneurship...) the private top schools in Spain will be excellent, I'm talking about IE, IESE, ESADE, and EADA. And it's true, thinking of a public University one intuitively presumes that it must be less sophisticated, or further away from "real" business. A silly idea maybe...
What would you say about the situation in this regard in CarlosIII?
Thank you in advance.

<blockquote>
In the case of the MBA: the advantges of a business school are in many aspects as for instance recruiters (top notch consulting firms, banks, multinationals, etc) do prefer the prestigious schools. Also for networking (does not exist at all here in Publics), track record (IESE or ESADE have more than 30 years of MBAS), entrepreneurship, flexibility in the program, ability to atrack best teachers (in Publics, teachers are there for life as public servants),...
</blockquote>

Hi Jaitego,
I'm very curious to get your point of view on the above post by SingleSpain.
I would think that in all these aspects named above (recruiters, networking, flexibility of program, entrepreneurship...) the private top schools in Spain will be excellent, I'm talking about IE, IESE, ESADE, and EADA. And it's true, thinking of a public University one intuitively presumes that it must be less sophisticated, or further away from "real" business. A silly idea maybe...
What would you say about the situation in this regard in CarlosIII?
Thank you in advance.
quote

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