Masters in Business and Management (MBM) or MIB - NZ


Hello, I'm a B.Tech(Computer Science and Engineering) graduate from India without work experience. I have applied for MBM in Waikato, Canterbury and Massey and also for Msc. International Business in University of Auckland. I'd like to know which one I should choose out of these, and also about the job prospects in New Zealand. I'm applying for the Jan/Feb/Mar 2013 intake and would like to know if it's advisable. Thanks in advance.

Hello, I'm a B.Tech(Computer Science and Engineering) graduate from India without work experience. I have applied for MBM in Waikato, Canterbury and Massey and also for Msc. International Business in University of Auckland. I'd like to know which one I should choose out of these, and also about the job prospects in New Zealand. I'm applying for the Jan/Feb/Mar 2013 intake and would like to know if it's advisable. Thanks in advance.
quote
dhaman

Hello,
Choosing the right university is crucial when it comes to studying abroad, and in your case I would suggest you to go for Auckland University as it is highly ranked NZ University (QS Ranking and Times Higher Education) and it is globally recognised and respected. Now as far as Job is concerned i would say in NZ it would be very difficult to land up with desired opportunity as it is a small economy and there are hardly any corporates to absorb Master's level graduate.I myself had done my Master's from AUT but there were not any suitable opportunity to my qualification. Any ways if you are considering NZ then do considerable research and then make a decision as Job market out here is very bleak. Regards

Hello,
Choosing the right university is crucial when it comes to studying abroad, and in your case I would suggest you to go for Auckland University as it is highly ranked NZ University (QS Ranking and Times Higher Education) and it is globally recognised and respected. Now as far as Job is concerned i would say in NZ it would be very difficult to land up with desired opportunity as it is a small economy and there are hardly any corporates to absorb Master's level graduate.I myself had done my Master's from AUT but there were not any suitable opportunity to my qualification. Any ways if you are considering NZ then do considerable research and then make a decision as Job market out here is very bleak. Regards
quote
ralph

Any ways if you are considering NZ then do considerable research and then make a decision as Job market out here is very bleak.

Generally agree with this, especially in the cases of graduates with the MBM and MSc degrees. An MBA from AUT, Otago, even Waikato would be much more valuable in terms of long-term career potential in New Zealand. I think the other masters programs would be better if you want to pursue more education, like a PhD; or to build up your management skills for more growth potential in your home country.

<blockquote>Any ways if you are considering NZ then do considerable research and then make a decision as Job market out here is very bleak.</blockquote>
Generally agree with this, especially in the cases of graduates with the MBM and MSc degrees. An MBA from AUT, Otago, even Waikato would be much more valuable in terms of long-term career potential in New Zealand. I think the other masters programs would be better if you want to pursue more education, like a PhD; or to build up your management skills for more growth potential in your home country.
quote
dhaman

An MBA from AUT, Otago, even Waikato would be much more valuable in terms of long-term career potential in New Zealand////

I am sorry but will not agree with what you have said about AUT or Otago MBA as i have come across many MBA students who have returned home without getting any job. In fact neither of these two schools have active career support like placement, internship and so on.even having a MBA qualification in NZ is not making any sense, as most employers prefer experience candidates over qualified professionals. As a matter of fact neither your home experience is valued nor your home education so most international students especially from Asia have either of these two problems and hence they do not land up with a job post studies.

An MBA from AUT, Otago, even Waikato would be much more valuable in terms of long-term career potential in New Zealand////

I am sorry but will not agree with what you have said about AUT or Otago MBA as i have come across many MBA students who have returned home without getting any job. In fact neither of these two schools have active career support like placement, internship and so on.even having a MBA qualification in NZ is not making any sense, as most employers prefer experience candidates over qualified professionals. As a matter of fact neither your home experience is valued nor your home education so most international students especially from Asia have either of these two problems and hence they do not land up with a job post studies.
quote
mba hipste...

I am sorry but will not agree with what you have said about AUT or Otago MBA as i have come across many MBA students who have returned home without getting any job.

It looks like Ralph was comparing MBA graduates with graduates from other masters level courses.

Of course, in both cases it will depend on the student's ambition as well - you can't just expect to be handed a job when you're done. You need to hit the ground running, be prepared to network, etc.

But I generally agree that MBA students will be better prepared to land jobs in New Zealand than somebody with an MiM, MBM, MSc, etc.

<blockquote>I am sorry but will not agree with what you have said about AUT or Otago MBA as i have come across many MBA students who have returned home without getting any job.</blockquote>
It looks like Ralph was comparing MBA graduates with graduates from other masters level courses.

Of course, in both cases it will depend on the student's ambition as well - you can't just expect to be handed a job when you're done. You need to hit the ground running, be prepared to network, etc.

But I generally agree that MBA students will be better prepared to land jobs in New Zealand than somebody with an MiM, MBM, MSc, etc.

quote
dhaman

The situation at the moment in NZ is that majority of international students who come to study MBA carry their home experience which unfortunately is not highly regarded ,, for instance one of my friend did MBA from AUT and had more than 5 years of business development experience buy he could not find any opportunity as he was not having any local experience .now my point here is that universities should step in and provide at least an internship , so that aforeohm student are well acquainted with local work culture . But your point is correct by just having an MBA one should not be served with a job, but again my experience in NZ says that investing in NZ MBA is complete no no , Australia seems a better option especially schools like Melbourne biz school or AGSM as they have very highly regarded MBA courses , for instance financial times or economist ranking.

The situation at the moment in NZ is that majority of international students who come to study MBA carry their home experience which unfortunately is not highly regarded ,, for instance one of my friend did MBA from AUT and had more than 5 years of business development experience buy he could not find any opportunity as he was not having any local experience .now my point here is that universities should step in and provide at least an internship , so that aforeohm student are well acquainted with local work culture . But your point is correct by just having an MBA one should not be served with a job, but again my experience in NZ says that investing in NZ MBA is complete no no , Australia seems a better option especially schools like Melbourne biz school or AGSM as they have very highly regarded MBA courses , for instance financial times or economist ranking.
quote
ralph

The situation at the moment in NZ is that majority of international students who come to study MBA carry their home experience which unfortunately is not highly regarded

But this true pretty much everywhere: international students face an increasingly uphill battle in landing jobs after graduation. There are countries like Canada where the legalities are more streamlined than say, the UK; however, even in these places you still face the same issues.

My advice to international students wanting to land jobs in a new country after graduation. Focus on these three priorities:

1. A command of the language (in business, social situations, etc.) is absolutely essential to long-term career growth in a new country.
2. Networking: From the time you land, you should hit the ground and connect with as many people in your field as you can. Go to conferences, networking events, roundtables, etc.
3. Use the business school to your advantage. Inquire about local business culture, and attend recruiting sessions.

Although it might seem hard for international students to land a job in New Zealand, many do it, and it can be done.

<blockquote>The situation at the moment in NZ is that majority of international students who come to study MBA carry their home experience which unfortunately is not highly regarded</blockquote>
But this true pretty much everywhere: international students face an increasingly uphill battle in landing jobs after graduation. There are countries like Canada where the legalities are more streamlined than say, the UK; however, even in these places you still face the same issues.

My advice to international students wanting to land jobs in a new country after graduation. Focus on these three priorities:

1. A command of the language (in business, social situations, etc.) is absolutely essential to long-term career growth in a new country.
2. Networking: From the time you land, you should hit the ground and connect with as many people in your field as you can. Go to conferences, networking events, roundtables, etc.
3. Use the business school to your advantage. Inquire about local business culture, and attend recruiting sessions.

Although it might seem hard for international students to land a job in New Zealand, many do it, and it can be done.
quote
dhaman

Before choosing a MBA programme I believe these three things must e considered. As MBA in an overseas nation is a huge investment the return on that investment has to be high over the period of time.

First thing Check out the ranking of that particular B-school.The most reliable ranking source would be Financial times and Economist. These rankings have all the information especially Salary, career, international mobility ,aims achieved. these rankings are the most credible ranking for MBA programmes worldwide.

2. Check out whether campus placements or internship are given post completion of MBA and which industrial sector is recruiting the most.

3. Impact of the MBA programme globally, especially having an active and prominent alumni is critical in gaining an insight into the reputation of the programme.

Before choosing a MBA programme I believe these three things must e considered. As MBA in an overseas nation is a huge investment the return on that investment has to be high over the period of time.

First thing Check out the ranking of that particular B-school.The most reliable ranking source would be Financial times and Economist. These rankings have all the information especially Salary, career, international mobility ,aims achieved. these rankings are the most credible ranking for MBA programmes worldwide.

2. Check out whether campus placements or internship are given post completion of MBA and which industrial sector is recruiting the most.

3. Impact of the MBA programme globally, especially having an active and prominent alumni is critical in gaining an insight into the reputation of the programme.
quote
BigD

Another thing to note is that in Australia at least, International Students cannot undertake _part-time_ MBA or EMBA courses, even if they have a temporary residence (ie not a student) visa.

This is because "International students" are not allowed under the terms of a student visa to do part time courses. However anyone that is not a citizen or a permanent resident is judged by the universities to be "International" with the associated limitations and fees.

BigD

Another thing to note is that in Australia at least, International Students cannot undertake _part-time_ MBA or EMBA courses, even if they have a temporary residence (ie not a student) visa.

This is because "International students" are not allowed under the terms of a student visa to do part time courses. However anyone that is not a citizen or a permanent resident is judged by the universities to be "International" with the associated limitations and fees.

BigD
quote
ezra

This is a good point and bears repeating - and is also true in places outside of Australia. I know this is true in the part-time MBA program at NYU Stern. And typically, the F1 visa (for international students in the US) only applies to full-time study.

But this is generally a moot point, as part-time MBAs and EMBA programs are usually designed for working professionals already living in the region.

This is a good point and bears repeating - and is also true in places outside of Australia. I know this is true in the part-time MBA program at NYU Stern. And typically, the F1 visa (for international students in the US) only applies to full-time study.

But this is generally a moot point, as part-time MBAs and EMBA programs are usually designed for working professionals already living in the region.
quote
BigD

Or they are migrants that are on a temporary visitors visa (valid for four years in Australia) who want to work and study but can't combine this with a part time course. A strange situation.

A further anomaly is that as of 1 Jan 2013 (implementation of Knight review recommendations) you get full unlimited working rights with a student visa but are still limited to full-time study. Then it becomes an issue of whether the university considers you are working too much rather than studying and whether you can find employment flexible enough.

It is a Catch 22.

BigD


But this is generally a moot point, as part-time MBAs and EMBA programs are usually designed for working professionals already living in the region.

Or they are migrants that are on a temporary visitors visa (valid for four years in Australia) who want to work and study but can't combine this with a part time course. A strange situation.

A further anomaly is that as of 1 Jan 2013 (implementation of Knight review recommendations) you get full unlimited working rights with a student visa but are still limited to full-time study. Then it becomes an issue of whether the university considers you are working too much rather than studying and whether you can find employment flexible enough.

It is a Catch 22.

BigD

<blockquote>
But this is generally a moot point, as part-time MBAs and EMBA programs are usually designed for working professionals already living in the region.</blockquote>
quote
dhaman

I have actually noticed one thing here in New Zealand that most of the MBA programme are for domestic students only,like Massey, Waikato and Auckland Uni's. i am not sure if that is the case with Australian MBA programme, and even those MBA programme which are being open to international students like AUT, Otago or Victoria are actually not doing enough to make it make it more sustainable over the period of time. For instance word of mouth about NZ MBA amongst international students is that it is actually meant for executives who are already into the workforce . so my point is they are delivering more of executive MBA pattern , but international students get confused with this, and end up no where.

So students must be careful while opting for MBA programme especially one which clearly states that it is valid for 3 or 5+ years of experience holders, which is clearly indicative of the fact that it is for senior corporates and not for intermediate or junior level applicants.
International students must look at the eligibility criteria more closely and then decide what suits them the best.

I have actually noticed one thing here in New Zealand that most of the MBA programme are for domestic students only,like Massey, Waikato and Auckland Uni's. i am not sure if that is the case with Australian MBA programme, and even those MBA programme which are being open to international students like AUT, Otago or Victoria are actually not doing enough to make it make it more sustainable over the period of time. For instance word of mouth about NZ MBA amongst international students is that it is actually meant for executives who are already into the workforce . so my point is they are delivering more of executive MBA pattern , but international students get confused with this, and end up no where.

So students must be careful while opting for MBA programme especially one which clearly states that it is valid for 3 or 5+ years of experience holders, which is clearly indicative of the fact that it is for senior corporates and not for intermediate or junior level applicants.
International students must look at the eligibility criteria more closely and then decide what suits them the best.
quote
ezra

even those MBA programme which are being open to international students like AUT, Otago or Victoria are actually not doing enough to make it make it more sustainable over the period of time.

It could be that Australia and New Zealand just aren't in need of management-level labor from abroad, at least when compared to growing markets in Asia and other places. If this is the case, that it is a macro level issue, then there's not that much that business schools can do for international graduates.

<blockquote>even those MBA programme which are being open to international students like AUT, Otago or Victoria are actually not doing enough to make it make it more sustainable over the period of time.</blockquote>
It could be that Australia and New Zealand just aren't in need of management-level labor from abroad, at least when compared to growing markets in Asia and other places. If this is the case, that it is a macro level issue, then there's not that much that business schools can do for international graduates.
quote
otago-mba

Wish I had seen this post earlier. Perhaps I can step in and provide some additional information on the Otago MBA.

The full time Otago MBA is a two phase intensive program. Phase One comprises 9 months of on-campus study. This is followed by a highly flexible Phase Two of on-campus electives, international exchange or distance learning through online media. Phase Two can range between 6 to 12 months depending on how hard and fast you can or want to work. Otago runs the only truly full time MBA program in New Zealand. GMAT score is required. You can find out more about us at www.otago.ac.nz/mbaotago.

The part-time MBA admission is slightly different. Students may be awarded a diploma if they wish to stop after 8 papers. If they wish to go on to an MBA degree, then they must achieve an average grade of B+ or better on designated papers, or sit for the GMAT. Time it takes to complete a part-time MBA is expected to be longer.

The Otago MBA set out to prepare our students to be career ready professisonals. In addition to a rigorous academic syllabus, it also include career development guidance, practical experience and networking activities. We are the longest established, offer the one truly full time MBA option in NZ, run a very comprehensive program, and are favourably ranked many times.

As for your questions on career opportunities, you can always discuss your career aspirations with your mentor and personal coach when you are on the program. I believe the key is to find a good fit between your experience and a suitable job opening, and also to select your business project in line with your career interest.

If you are still looking around for a suitable MBA, you can join our Linkedin sitehttp://www.linkedin.com/groups/Otago-MBA-2295?gid=2295&mostPopular=&trk=tyah where you might talk to some of the students who have already found jobs before they formally graduate.

Hope this information helps. Why not register your interest to start your discussion with us at: www.otago.ac.nz/mbaotago/otago_mba_apply_now.php

Cheers, Hester

Wish I had seen this post earlier. Perhaps I can step in and provide some additional information on the Otago MBA.

The full time Otago MBA is a two phase intensive program. Phase One comprises 9 months of on-campus study. This is followed by a highly flexible Phase Two of on-campus electives, international exchange or distance learning through online media. Phase Two can range between 6 to 12 months depending on how hard and fast you can or want to work. Otago runs the only truly full time MBA program in New Zealand. GMAT score is required. You can find out more about us at www.otago.ac.nz/mbaotago.

The part-time MBA admission is slightly different. Students may be awarded a diploma if they wish to stop after 8 papers. If they wish to go on to an MBA degree, then they must achieve an average grade of B+ or better on designated papers, or sit for the GMAT. Time it takes to complete a part-time MBA is expected to be longer.

The Otago MBA set out to prepare our students to be career ready professisonals. In addition to a rigorous academic syllabus, it also include career development guidance, practical experience and networking activities. We are the longest established, offer the one truly full time MBA option in NZ, run a very comprehensive program, and are favourably ranked many times.

As for your questions on career opportunities, you can always discuss your career aspirations with your mentor and personal coach when you are on the program. I believe the key is to find a good fit between your experience and a suitable job opening, and also to select your business project in line with your career interest.

If you are still looking around for a suitable MBA, you can join our Linkedin sitehttp://www.linkedin.com/groups/Otago-MBA-2295?gid=2295&mostPopular=&trk=tyah where you might talk to some of the students who have already found jobs before they formally graduate.

Hope this information helps. Why not register your interest to start your discussion with us at: www.otago.ac.nz/mbaotago/otago_mba_apply_now.php

Cheers, Hester
quote

Reply to Post

Related Business Schools

Auckland, New Zealand 24 Followers 21 Discussions
Palmerston North, New Zealand 9 Followers 9 Discussions
Christchurch, New Zealand 12 Followers 10 Discussions
Dunedin, New Zealand 39 Followers 33 Discussions
Auckland, New Zealand 20 Followers 17 Discussions
Hamilton, New Zealand 3 Followers 5 Discussions

Other Related Content

Jun 26, 2020

MBA Application Deadlines: Spring 2021

News Jun 26, 2020

MBAs in New Zealand: Native English, Internationally Recognized Education & Jobs Aplenty

Article Apr 19, 2017

New Zealand offers MBA students a world-class education combined with exciting extra-curricular activities and cultural diversity to boot.