Which country?


fishball

Then if nothing is wrong with your country, why are you looking at options?

Most countries are bloody racist in their own way towards foreigners that are coming to get jobs there. You cannot expect them to give you preference in jobs, unless you're white and the country has an inferiority complex to the whites (which most asian countries you've mentioned have). If you're brown or something, you'll probably face some kind of opposition unless you were recruited from outside the country and brought in. Even then, lots of foreign blue collar workers face racism simply because they're pretty fucked up to begin with.

So yeah, if your own country is good, then stay there. There are always opportunities to make plenty of money (if that's what you're concerned about).

Then if nothing is wrong with your country, why are you looking at options?

Most countries are bloody racist in their own way towards foreigners that are coming to get jobs there. You cannot expect them to give you preference in jobs, unless you're white and the country has an inferiority complex to the whites (which most asian countries you've mentioned have). If you're brown or something, you'll probably face some kind of opposition unless you were recruited from outside the country and brought in. Even then, lots of foreign blue collar workers face racism simply because they're pretty fucked up to begin with.

So yeah, if your own country is good, then stay there. There are always opportunities to make plenty of money (if that's what you're concerned about).

quote
ysbheejin

As had been previously stated, Korea is a rich country, and while Singapore, Hong Kong, and Malaysia are growing in scale, I would say if you were working to get ahead of the game Korea would probably be your best bet.

It was the first country to recover out of the crisis, and is the most eyed country in terms of growth.

Also, take into consideration what industry you want to focus on. That might help you a little more on making your decision.

The best steps in finding a job are to visit the country, in Korea, Yonsei has this great place for international students, and the Global MBA program links you in with all the right people. Take a look at it and see what it can give you.

In terms of racism, as fishball had said, it happens everyone, whether your in the US or in Europe. That's prolly just sthg we all have to deal with. But if your looking at growth and salary, Korea is definitely a recommended country.

As had been previously stated, Korea is a rich country, and while Singapore, Hong Kong, and Malaysia are growing in scale, I would say if you were working to get ahead of the game Korea would probably be your best bet.

It was the first country to recover out of the crisis, and is the most eyed country in terms of growth.

Also, take into consideration what industry you want to focus on. That might help you a little more on making your decision.

The best steps in finding a job are to visit the country, in Korea, Yonsei has this great place for international students, and the Global MBA program links you in with all the right people. Take a look at it and see what it can give you.

In terms of racism, as fishball had said, it happens everyone, whether your in the US or in Europe. That's prolly just sthg we all have to deal with. But if your looking at growth and salary, Korea is definitely a recommended country.
quote
Nazme

Thanks ysbheejin.

Thanks ysbheejin.
quote
Nazme

ysbheejin Will normal MBA or MBA field like Finance,H.R etc. other field will not work.

ysbheejin Will normal MBA or MBA field like Finance,H.R etc. other field will not work.
quote
ysbheejin

The Global MBA program at Yonsei is a normal MBA, and provides students with the option to concentrate in three functional areas, should you choose to do so. I believe those areas include Finance, Marketing, or Strategy/Management.

I hope this helps

The Global MBA program at Yonsei is a normal MBA, and provides students with the option to concentrate in three functional areas, should you choose to do so. I believe those areas include Finance, Marketing, or Strategy/Management.

I hope this helps
quote
Nazme

Thanks for the reply ysbheenjin.

Thanks for the reply ysbheenjin.
quote

All,

got any info for job market for foreigner with top-tier MBA program in KOrea? I heard that koreans are not really welcome to foreigner, esp. in job situation...(no offense, I just read some posts in internet forums...)

I'm thinking to go to Yonsei, but little worry about future job after graduating...I plan to go into finance, i.e I banking or investment management/analysis...

Thanks

All,

got any info for job market for foreigner with top-tier MBA program in KOrea? I heard that koreans are not really welcome to foreigner, esp. in job situation...(no offense, I just read some posts in internet forums...)

I'm thinking to go to Yonsei, but little worry about future job after graduating...I plan to go into finance, i.e I banking or investment management/analysis...

Thanks
quote
Nazme

neomessiah do you think it is easy to get job in Korea as a forigner and is it easy to get work permit?

neomessiah do you think it is easy to get job in Korea as a forigner and is it easy to get work permit?
quote

Nazme,

I don't know. I heard that there's some kind of "protectionism" in Korea...is it true?

And I read somewhere that Koreans are overeducated society...and many koreans with top tier US MBA also look for a decent job at home...does it mean that foreigner, with korean MBA, will be less competitive in employer's view?

Need someone who really know to clarify.
Thanks.

Nazme,

I don't know. I heard that there's some kind of "protectionism" in Korea...is it true?

And I read somewhere that Koreans are overeducated society...and many koreans with top tier US MBA also look for a decent job at home...does it mean that foreigner, with korean MBA, will be less competitive in employer's view?

Need someone who really know to clarify.
Thanks.
quote
fishball

Call the company that you want to work for in Korea and speak to their HR.

Call the company that you want to work for in Korea and speak to their HR.

quote
Nazme

neomessiah even I am in same situation and If you any information related to this topic than please give me.

neomessiah even I am in same situation and If you any information related to this topic than please give me.
quote
Lost4Now

This is how I would personally rank it:

1. China
China is going to be the world's next superpower. Everybody knows that. Being able to get into something early is a rare chance that rarely ever comes. It's like knowing in advanced about how successful Microsoft or Google will be 20 years ago. If you knew it back then you definitely would invest, it's similar in this situation. Everybody knows it, so why not go for it? This is assuming you know Mandarin. Otherwise you're screwed for jobs.

If you can though, going to Tsinghua or Peking is golden. These two schools are relatively low ranked internationally, but they are basically the Harvard or MIT equivalent of China. People in China absolutely hold Tsinghua and Peking at the top. From what I hear, top students in China tend to choose Tsinghua and Peking first (rather than going abroad). This is beneficial to you if you choose China, because you know those you become friends with are the brightest China can offer and probably will be leaders of China. Very good for networking. They are brand names in China, and when China rockets off, they probably will become top schools for everything. They are kind of like what Harvard and Yale was 200 years ago when the US was a country no one cared about. Harvard and Yale back then were no name, no one knew about them, even though they were the best in teh US. Back then, if you were smart, you went to Cambridge or Oxford. Even in the 1920s, if you were smart you would go to Germany or the UK to study. But when the US economy took off and they became the superpower after WWII, Harvard and Yale suddenly became world class too, overpassing Oxford and Cambridge. I think in the next 50 years, Tsinghua and Peking will be the schools people would want to have on their resume. Just my prediction though. I could be wrong.

At the moment schools like CEIBS are better, but in my opinion, Tsinghua and Beida are the smarter choice if you are taking inevitable future growth in reputation into account.

2. Singapore
Well established MBA programs. You can get by with just English if need be. First class city. INSEAD etc... are well established brand names that are options if you choose Singapore. NUS has strong international recognition as a university generally (although I personally feel this is more of a reflection of their strength in medicine though), which might be a bonus.

3. Hong Kong
Also relatively well established MBA programs. HK can be one of the many gates into China's growth engine. One of the world's top financial centers, and a first class city. Not sure if any of the schools can truly be considered world class, but because they are located in HK chances of you landing a top job might be higher due to connections by way of proximity.

4. South Korea
Their economy has seen strong growth for the past decade or more and probably will exhibit decent growth in the future, but truthfully, despite what Korean nationalists will tell you, the brand recognition of their schools don't compare to HK or Singapore. China will probably surpass them soon enough, and their universities aren't well recognized either. I think you'd be lying to yourself if you think SNU or Yonsei are top schools internationally. They barely rank at all in terms of Asian MBA rankings. The market is prodominantly geared towards Koreans with elite American MBAs. They send their best to schools abroad, and when they come back, those are the people that get the top jobs. Local MBAs are basically not where the elite of Korea choose to go, and so you would end up socializing and networking with a bunch of foreigners that won't give you much value. They won't be well connected in Korea, so those connections won't be valuable. KOREANS are having trouble finding good jobs in Korea, imagine how foreigners would fare. So you can't get jobs in Korea PLUS you'd have no brand recognition outside of Korea. That's like a shot to the head in my opinion.

5. Taiwan
I haven't heard much about Taiwanese schools but I put Taiwan above Malaysia and Thailand because it's a wealthier nation. Using wikipedia I realize Taiwan National University is their most prestigious school, but if you asked me if I knew this before googling it I would definitely say no. You risk going to obscure schools no one knows about. Taiwanese also have a tendency to send their very best abroad as well.

6. Malaysia
I don't know ANYTHING about Malaysian schools. I'm only putting it above of Thailand because M comes before T. But realistically I can't even bash it if I wanted to because I know nothing about the schools in Malaysia, nor do I know anything about their economy. I think this would be the general stance held by most people. This can't be good for brand recognition of any MBA school in Malaysia. Don't go there.

7. Thailand
Thailand is a third world country. Any degree you get from there can't possibly be recognized internationally. The country is not stable politically. The growth engine isn't, in my opinion, powerful enough to attract investment at the global level. It had amazing growth in the 90s or so, but that ended long ago with the fall of their currency.

Of course the above is just my opinion. People may rank it differently, so if you feel that my rankings are wrong, go ahead and give your own opinion on the matter. I didn't base my opinion on the quality of the subject matter taught while studying there, so I could be wrong. But I did base my opinon on brand recognition and potential to network, which I personally think is the main point of MBA programs. Most MBA programs will give you sufficient quality, but not every program can give you the same networking opportunities. That is the truth.

This is how I would personally rank it:

1. China
China is going to be the world's next superpower. Everybody knows that. Being able to get into something early is a rare chance that rarely ever comes. It's like knowing in advanced about how successful Microsoft or Google will be 20 years ago. If you knew it back then you definitely would invest, it's similar in this situation. Everybody knows it, so why not go for it? This is assuming you know Mandarin. Otherwise you're screwed for jobs.

If you can though, going to Tsinghua or Peking is golden. These two schools are relatively low ranked internationally, but they are basically the Harvard or MIT equivalent of China. People in China absolutely hold Tsinghua and Peking at the top. From what I hear, top students in China tend to choose Tsinghua and Peking first (rather than going abroad). This is beneficial to you if you choose China, because you know those you become friends with are the brightest China can offer and probably will be leaders of China. Very good for networking. They are brand names in China, and when China rockets off, they probably will become top schools for everything. They are kind of like what Harvard and Yale was 200 years ago when the US was a country no one cared about. Harvard and Yale back then were no name, no one knew about them, even though they were the best in teh US. Back then, if you were smart, you went to Cambridge or Oxford. Even in the 1920s, if you were smart you would go to Germany or the UK to study. But when the US economy took off and they became the superpower after WWII, Harvard and Yale suddenly became world class too, overpassing Oxford and Cambridge. I think in the next 50 years, Tsinghua and Peking will be the schools people would want to have on their resume. Just my prediction though. I could be wrong.

At the moment schools like CEIBS are better, but in my opinion, Tsinghua and Beida are the smarter choice if you are taking inevitable future growth in reputation into account.

2. Singapore
Well established MBA programs. You can get by with just English if need be. First class city. INSEAD etc... are well established brand names that are options if you choose Singapore. NUS has strong international recognition as a university generally (although I personally feel this is more of a reflection of their strength in medicine though), which might be a bonus.

3. Hong Kong
Also relatively well established MBA programs. HK can be one of the many gates into China's growth engine. One of the world's top financial centers, and a first class city. Not sure if any of the schools can truly be considered world class, but because they are located in HK chances of you landing a top job might be higher due to connections by way of proximity.

4. South Korea
Their economy has seen strong growth for the past decade or more and probably will exhibit decent growth in the future, but truthfully, despite what Korean nationalists will tell you, the brand recognition of their schools don't compare to HK or Singapore. China will probably surpass them soon enough, and their universities aren't well recognized either. I think you'd be lying to yourself if you think SNU or Yonsei are top schools internationally. They barely rank at all in terms of Asian MBA rankings. The market is prodominantly geared towards Koreans with elite American MBAs. They send their best to schools abroad, and when they come back, those are the people that get the top jobs. Local MBAs are basically not where the elite of Korea choose to go, and so you would end up socializing and networking with a bunch of foreigners that won't give you much value. They won't be well connected in Korea, so those connections won't be valuable. KOREANS are having trouble finding good jobs in Korea, imagine how foreigners would fare. So you can't get jobs in Korea PLUS you'd have no brand recognition outside of Korea. That's like a shot to the head in my opinion.

5. Taiwan
I haven't heard much about Taiwanese schools but I put Taiwan above Malaysia and Thailand because it's a wealthier nation. Using wikipedia I realize Taiwan National University is their most prestigious school, but if you asked me if I knew this before googling it I would definitely say no. You risk going to obscure schools no one knows about. Taiwanese also have a tendency to send their very best abroad as well.

6. Malaysia
I don't know ANYTHING about Malaysian schools. I'm only putting it above of Thailand because M comes before T. But realistically I can't even bash it if I wanted to because I know nothing about the schools in Malaysia, nor do I know anything about their economy. I think this would be the general stance held by most people. This can't be good for brand recognition of any MBA school in Malaysia. Don't go there.

7. Thailand
Thailand is a third world country. Any degree you get from there can't possibly be recognized internationally. The country is not stable politically. The growth engine isn't, in my opinion, powerful enough to attract investment at the global level. It had amazing growth in the 90s or so, but that ended long ago with the fall of their currency.

Of course the above is just my opinion. People may rank it differently, so if you feel that my rankings are wrong, go ahead and give your own opinion on the matter. I didn't base my opinion on the quality of the subject matter taught while studying there, so I could be wrong. But I did base my opinon on brand recognition and potential to network, which I personally think is the main point of MBA programs. Most MBA programs will give you sufficient quality, but not every program can give you the same networking opportunities. That is the truth.
quote
Lost4Now

Just for the hell of it I'll throw Japan in there too even though you didn't ask. Japan's corporate culture is VERY sceptical of the utility of the MBA. They prefer to hire top UNDERGRADUATE students (usually from the law faculty for some reason) from schools like the University of Tokyo and mold them into the type of employee that they prefer. They want you to fit into a certain corporate culture, and to be the exact type of executive that they want you to be. It is VERY elite school focused. Your future is based so heavily on which school you go to it's ridiculous. The average pay of executives is low anyway, so I don't know why you would want to work in Japan. Korea is more merit based, whereas Japan is very seniority based (so you will always be paid less than the guy that joined the firm before you, no matter how well you perform). Bonuses suck too. I would caution doing an MBA in a country that is reluctant to recognize the usefulness of one. You can't network with future business superstars (because they won't be if they aren't given the chance to be) because the future superstars will be hired from the undergraduate programs, not the MBA programs. Your main chance for employment, in my opinion, will be with MNC, or abroad (outside of Japan).

NOTE: All of my posts up to now is based on future job prospects in the country that you are taking the MBA. So China MBA's worth in China, Japanese MBA in Japan etc... I didn't take salary into account, but I suspect the ranking won't change much (if taking salary into account, bump China down a couple notches).

Just for the hell of it I'll throw Japan in there too even though you didn't ask. Japan's corporate culture is VERY sceptical of the utility of the MBA. They prefer to hire top UNDERGRADUATE students (usually from the law faculty for some reason) from schools like the University of Tokyo and mold them into the type of employee that they prefer. They want you to fit into a certain corporate culture, and to be the exact type of executive that they want you to be. It is VERY elite school focused. Your future is based so heavily on which school you go to it's ridiculous. The average pay of executives is low anyway, so I don't know why you would want to work in Japan. Korea is more merit based, whereas Japan is very seniority based (so you will always be paid less than the guy that joined the firm before you, no matter how well you perform). Bonuses suck too. I would caution doing an MBA in a country that is reluctant to recognize the usefulness of one. You can't network with future business superstars (because they won't be if they aren't given the chance to be) because the future superstars will be hired from the undergraduate programs, not the MBA programs. Your main chance for employment, in my opinion, will be with MNC, or abroad (outside of Japan).

NOTE: All of my posts up to now is based on future job prospects in the country that you are taking the MBA. So China MBA's worth in China, Japanese MBA in Japan etc... I didn't take salary into account, but I suspect the ranking won't change much (if taking salary into account, bump China down a couple notches).
quote

Lost4now,

Thanks for your post.
I have heard your view in other sites (about S.Korea).

Well, I guess it's confirmed now.

Lost4now,

Thanks for your post.
I have heard your view in other sites (about S.Korea).

Well, I guess it's confirmed now.
quote
Nazme

Thanks allot Lost4now for giving such useful information.
But I have few doubts-:
1.Singapore-I read on Internet that forigner are not getting jobs easily in Singapore because Singapore company prefer local students than forign students and if any person gets job in Singapore than they are paid less.

2.China-I dont know mandrain so its useless to think about China.

Lost4now which country do you think is best in the world in terms of salary and job availability for forigners and ease of work permit.

Thanks allot Lost4now for giving such useful information.
But I have few doubts-:
1.Singapore-I read on Internet that forigner are not getting jobs easily in Singapore because Singapore company prefer local students than forign students and if any person gets job in Singapore than they are paid less.

2.China-I dont know mandrain so its useless to think about China.

Lost4now which country do you think is best in the world in terms of salary and job availability for forigners and ease of work permit.
quote
Lost4Now

Honestly, ALL of the countries listed prefer local students that go abroad to elite schools, or top elite local students. The question is to what degree. The market for foreign MBA students have always been weak across the board, which makes sense. You can't expect to go into a country, not know their culture, not know the people, not know the language, and suddenly be able to surpass candidates of the same level of intelligence but have everything else you don't have as well. I can understand that Singaporean companies are not giving jobs to foreign MBAs, but the difference is those schools, like INSEAD, will put you ahead of the game if you have to go to Plan B (get a job elsewhere). Your chances of getting a job in Singapore is much higher than if you were to try to get one in Seoul. There is NO country in Asia that prefers foreign MBAs, unless they are from elite schools and have 20 years of proven performance record. Don't let anyone delude you into believing you will have special rank because you can't speak their language well, that's just ridiculous. The best you can do is finding the place that is slightly better off than the rest.

But I would say HK would be the best for job prospects in comparison to the others. But that might be my biased view since most of my friends who work in Asia are in HK right now. As for work permit, that's something you can look into yourself. I'm not willing to waste an hour looking at all the embassy websites because I don't want to work in most of those countries.


Honestly, ALL of the countries listed prefer local students that go abroad to elite schools, or top elite local students. The question is to what degree. The market for foreign MBA students have always been weak across the board, which makes sense. You can't expect to go into a country, not know their culture, not know the people, not know the language, and suddenly be able to surpass candidates of the same level of intelligence but have everything else you don't have as well. I can understand that Singaporean companies are not giving jobs to foreign MBAs, but the difference is those schools, like INSEAD, will put you ahead of the game if you have to go to Plan B (get a job elsewhere). Your chances of getting a job in Singapore is much higher than if you were to try to get one in Seoul. There is NO country in Asia that prefers foreign MBAs, unless they are from elite schools and have 20 years of proven performance record. Don't let anyone delude you into believing you will have special rank because you can't speak their language well, that's just ridiculous. The best you can do is finding the place that is slightly better off than the rest.

But I would say HK would be the best for job prospects in comparison to the others. But that might be my biased view since most of my friends who work in Asia are in HK right now. As for work permit, that's something you can look into yourself. I'm not willing to waste an hour looking at all the embassy websites because I don't want to work in most of those countries.
quote
fishball

Given the level of those questions, it wouldn't matter where you got your MBA from, or where you want to work, or anything at all. You're such a superstar, I guess you wouldn't have time to check out work permits on your own.

Given the level of those questions, it wouldn't matter where you got your MBA from, or where you want to work, or anything at all. You're such a superstar, I guess you wouldn't have time to check out work permits on your own.

quote
Lost4Now

True enough. This question is pretty general. "Which country" is something you should be deciding for yourself. It's something you can look into on your own. Research their school system, who the elites of the country are, who are getting what jobs, what type of industries are prevalent, which MNC are present in that country etc...

There are so many exceptions to every rule, any one person can only give you a generalization based on what their own social group believes. For example, I said that no country prefers foreign MBAs, that statement is made assuming that you are aiming to work for prominant local companies that are trying to grow organically. For MNC, foreign MBAs are probably more valuable and may be sought after (since they provide new perspective etc...). The point is, there is no absolute rule on the matter, how you decide is based so much on what you want, where you want to go etc... So definitely I can see why fishball is annoyed. This "confusion" of yours is definitely something you should try to fix on your own, and then later come back and clarify specific points.

True enough. This question is pretty general. "Which country" is something you should be deciding for yourself. It's something you can look into on your own. Research their school system, who the elites of the country are, who are getting what jobs, what type of industries are prevalent, which MNC are present in that country etc...

There are so many exceptions to every rule, any one person can only give you a generalization based on what their own social group believes. For example, I said that no country prefers foreign MBAs, that statement is made assuming that you are aiming to work for prominant local companies that are trying to grow organically. For MNC, foreign MBAs are probably more valuable and may be sought after (since they provide new perspective etc...). The point is, there is no absolute rule on the matter, how you decide is based so much on what you want, where you want to go etc... So definitely I can see why fishball is annoyed. This "confusion" of yours is definitely something you should try to fix on your own, and then later come back and clarify specific points.
quote
Rhino

If I may add something regarding singapore.

Singapore is the most english-friendly country compared to H.K. or anywhere in Asia.
The employers are very welcoming to foreigners because they have a shortage of white-collar worker.
However, there is a twist in it. Most of them would prefer to employ Singapore Citizen/ Permanent Resident.
Because the companies don't want the hassle of sponsoring foreigner and they won't get Tax break if they hire foreigners.

The salary level in Singapore is lower compared to H.K. but so as their personal tax rate.
Singapore is considered as a Tax-haven (and asian "money laundering" machine).
That's why hedge funds love to open shops here.

Despite all the negativity, Singapore will the the global Private banking office.
Some of the known private banks have opened shops here aggressively because south-east asia has abundant of wealth.
The future of Singapore will lies in Private bank, Inv Banking operations and health-care.
Of course there are also logistics and real estate industries.

Note: I have undergrad degree from U.S. and have been working in Singapore for the past 3 years with british bank.

If I may add something regarding singapore.

Singapore is the most english-friendly country compared to H.K. or anywhere in Asia.
The employers are very welcoming to foreigners because they have a shortage of white-collar worker.
However, there is a twist in it. Most of them would prefer to employ Singapore Citizen/ Permanent Resident.
Because the companies don't want the hassle of sponsoring foreigner and they won't get Tax break if they hire foreigners.

The salary level in Singapore is lower compared to H.K. but so as their personal tax rate.
Singapore is considered as a Tax-haven (and asian "money laundering" machine).
That's why hedge funds love to open shops here.

Despite all the negativity, Singapore will the the global Private banking office.
Some of the known private banks have opened shops here aggressively because south-east asia has abundant of wealth.
The future of Singapore will lies in Private bank, Inv Banking operations and health-care.
Of course there are also logistics and real estate industries.

Note: I have undergrad degree from U.S. and have been working in Singapore for the past 3 years with british bank.
quote
Lost4Now

As had been previously stated, Korea is a rich country, and while Singapore, Hong Kong, and Malaysia are growing in scale, I would say if you were working to get ahead of the game Korea would probably be your best bet.

It was the first country to recover out of the crisis, and is the most eyed country in terms of growth.


I just wanted to point out the obvious by saying that I absolutely do not agree with these statements. The status of Korea is overblown in these statements.

Korea is rich compared to other Asian countries, true, and it is indeed richer than Malaysia, but no one with any credibility will put Singapore and Hong Kong on the same line as Malaysia. The way the first paragraph is worded is almost suggesting that Korea is where the action is at because it's richer and has more opportunities than Hong Kong and Singapore. Almost suggesting that Singapore and Hong Kong is some sort of developing emerging market... they're not, they are well established financial centers. The GDP per capita of both Hong Kong and Singapore is almost double that of Korea's. Hong Kong is considered one of the world's foremost financial centers (right behind NY and London). There are more billionaires in Hong Kong than all of Korea combined (despite Korea having a much larger population). Hong Kong and Singapore has some of the highest concentrations of corporate offices in Asia. And to be fair, if you're going to say that Hong Kong and Singapore are cities, essentially, then you can compare them to Seoul. They are still much wealthier than Seoul (Korea's wealthiest city) on a GDP per capita basis.

And Korea is not the most eyed country in terms of growth. It is China that is the most eyed country in terms of growth. The whole LoneStar thing didn't help either (especially since there ended up being no evidence against them).

<blockquote>As had been previously stated, Korea is a rich country, and while Singapore, Hong Kong, and Malaysia are growing in scale, I would say if you were working to get ahead of the game Korea would probably be your best bet.

It was the first country to recover out of the crisis, and is the most eyed country in terms of growth.</blockquote>

I just wanted to point out the obvious by saying that I absolutely do not agree with these statements. The status of Korea is overblown in these statements.

Korea is rich compared to other Asian countries, true, and it is indeed richer than Malaysia, but no one with any credibility will put Singapore and Hong Kong on the same line as Malaysia. The way the first paragraph is worded is almost suggesting that Korea is where the action is at because it's richer and has more opportunities than Hong Kong and Singapore. Almost suggesting that Singapore and Hong Kong is some sort of developing emerging market... they're not, they are well established financial centers. The GDP per capita of both Hong Kong and Singapore is almost double that of Korea's. Hong Kong is considered one of the world's foremost financial centers (right behind NY and London). There are more billionaires in Hong Kong than all of Korea combined (despite Korea having a much larger population). Hong Kong and Singapore has some of the highest concentrations of corporate offices in Asia. And to be fair, if you're going to say that Hong Kong and Singapore are cities, essentially, then you can compare them to Seoul. They are still much wealthier than Seoul (Korea's wealthiest city) on a GDP per capita basis.

And Korea is not the most eyed country in terms of growth. It is China that is the most eyed country in terms of growth. The whole LoneStar thing didn't help either (especially since there ended up being no evidence against them).


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